Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Thu, 17 Aug 2017 06:55:34 -0400

'He's toxic!': Trump goes after 2 GOP senators for Charlottesville criticism

'He's toxic!': Trump goes after 2 GOP senators for Charlottesville criticismTrump attacked Sens. Jeff Flake, an outspoken critic, and Lindsey Graham, one of few Republicans to call out the president by name over Charlottesville.


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15 Most Stressful Jobs in the World

Everyone has a bad day at work now and then. But if you have one of these 15 Most Stressful Jobs in the World, even one bad day can get you or someone else killed. From EMT to Coal Miner to Ice Road Trucker, these are the jobs that will keep you up at nights!


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Herald Sun | Breaking News
last updated: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 22:01:00 GMT

Canal jumper released on bail
AN 18-year-old man who jumped into a canal at Surfers Paradise to avoid being arrested by police on Wednesday night has been granted bail.

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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Thu, 17 Aug 2017 17:04:56 -0400

'He's toxic!': Trump goes after 2 GOP senators for Charlottesville criticism

'He's toxic!': Trump goes after 2 GOP senators for Charlottesville criticismTrump attacked Sens. Jeff Flake, an outspoken critic, and Lindsey Graham, one of few Republicans to call out the president by name over Charlottesville.


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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Fri, 18 Aug 2017 07:41:49 -0400

Trump reacts to Barcelona terror by touting (debunked) anti-Muslim war crime tale

Trump reacts to Barcelona terror by touting (debunked) anti-Muslim war crime talePresident Trump responded to the news of a terrorist attack in Spain by peddling a debunked legend about a general’s harsh tactics more than a century ago.


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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Thu, 17 Aug 2017 17:12:00 -0400

Trump reacts to Barcelona terror by touting (debunked) anti-Muslim war crime tale

Trump reacts to Barcelona terror by touting (debunked) anti-Muslim war crime talePresident Trump responded to the news of a terrorist attack in Spain by peddling a debunked legend about a general’s harsh tactics more than a century ago.


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Herald Sun | Top Stories
last updated: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 09:41:00 GMT

Response from Eddie, AFL not nearly enough
THERE'S so much wrong about the Eddie McGuire-James-Brayshaw-Danny Frawley pack mentality attack of Caroline Wilson. As was the AFL's insipid response on Monday.

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Secret tape not the only talking point
THE reasons behind a decision to release a secret expletive-laden recording of former Chief Justice Tim Carmody are almost as juicy as the tape is expected to be.

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Digg Top Stories
last updated: Tue, 15 Aug 2017 21:25:51 +0000

NASA's Ambitious Plan To Save Earth From A Supervolcano
With an eruption brewing, it may be the only way to prevent the extinction of the human race.

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Spanish police shoot five suspects dead after van rampage kills 13 in Barcelona
BARCELONA (Reuters) - Spanish police shot dead five would-be attackers after confronting them early on Friday in a town south of Barcelona where hours earlier a suspected Islamist militant drove a van into crowds, killing 13 people and wounding scores of others.

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BuzzFeed - Latest
last updated: Fri, 18 Aug 2017 12:01:07 -0400

24 Celebrity Instagrams You Missed This Week

Two movie reunions this week, thanks to Instagram.


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TIME
last updated:

Several Wounded in Stabbing Attack in Western Finland
Police say they have shot the suspect in the leg

(COPENHAGEN, Denmark) — Police in Finland say they have shot a man in the leg after he was suspected of stabbing several people in the western city of Turku.

Finnish broadcaster YLE says several people were seen lying on the ground in the central part of the city.

On Twitter, police urged people to avoid that part of Turku.

Tabloid Ilta-Sanomat says six people were injured, one man and five women, and that a woman with stroller was attacked by a man with a large knife.

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How to Make Your Own Solar Eclipse Viewer
No eclipse glasses? No problem

Would-be solar eclipse observers across the continental United States have been buying up eclipse glasses to safely view the celestial event on Monday. But you can also make your own perfectly safe solar eclipse viewer at home, no special glasses necessary.

As NASA Solar Eclipse Educator Charles Fulco explained to TIME for Kids kid reporter Caroline Curran in the video above,”What I like about a solar viewer is you don’t even look in the direction of the sun so there’s no chance of anyone hurting their eyes.” Anyone can make a solar viewer with a shipping tube and a few household items: tinfoil, a hobby knife, an awl (a tool used for punching holes), some tape, and a marker.

First, make a small hole on one end of the tube with a hobby knife. “You don’t want to make it a very large hole,” says Fulco, “because the larger the hole, the fuzzier the image.” To make the image even clearer, you next tape a piece of foil over the hole you carved, then puncture an even smaller hole in the foil with the awl. (Safety goggles are a good idea during this part of the process.)

Next, cut out a larger rectangle near the other end of the tube as a viewing window. “The viewing window is going to let you look into the tube to see the image of the sun formed at the rear of the tube,” says Fulco.

During the eclipse, you put the tube over your shoulder, with the small hole pointed at the sun. Make sure you don’t look directly at the sun, because you could damage your eyes. Instead, look inside the tube through the large rectangular cutout and “you should see a bright, white image of the sun suddenly appear at the very end of the tube,” Fulco says.

For more details on how to make a solar eclipse viewer, watch the video above.

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Mike Pence Says Donald Trump Has ‘Can-Do Spirit’ Like Teddy Roosevelt
Vice President Mike Pence compared his boss to Teddy Roosevelt during a visit to the Panama Canal Thursday, saying the two shared a “can-do spirit” at a time when Trump has been widely criticized for his response to the violent white nationalist rallies in Charlottesville. “In President Donald Trump, I think the United States once…

Vice President Mike Pence compared his boss to Teddy Roosevelt during a visit to the Panama Canal Thursday, saying the two shared a “can-do spirit” at a time when Trump has been widely criticized for his response to the violent white nationalist rallies in Charlottesville.

“In President Donald Trump, I think the United States once again has a president whose vision, energy and can-do spirit is reminiscent of President Teddy Roosevelt,” Pence said, the Chicago Tribune reports. “Then, as now, we have a builder of boundless optimism, who seeks to usher in a new era of shared prosperity all across this new world.”

While Pence invoked some of the admirable presidential qualities Roosevelt was known for, Roosevelt also called whites “the forward race” and minorities “the backward race.” The latter is a fraught comparison as Trump is under fire for saying there was “blame on both sides” for the violence in Charlottesville and taking two days to explicitly condemn white supremacists.

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Heather Heyer’s Mom Doesn’t Want to Talk to Donald Trump After Charlottesville
"You can’t wash this one away by shaking my hand and saying, ‘I’m sorry’"

The mother of Heather Heyer, the woman killed while protesting Saturday’s white-supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, said she won’t talk to President Donald Trump “after what he said about my child.”

She had been so busy after her daughter’s death that she hadn’t watched TV news until Thursday night, Susan Bro told ABC on Friday.

“I saw an actual clip of him at a press conference equating the protesters ‘like Miss Heyer’ with the KKK and the white supremacists,” Bro said. “You can’t wash this one away by shaking my hand and saying, ‘I’m sorry.’ I’m not forgiving for that.”

Asked if she had something to say to Trump, Bro said, “Think before you speak.”

‘Unifying Words’

The White House said Thursday that it was “working on identifying a time that’s convenient for the family to speak with the president.”

“We appreciate the unifying words that Heather Heyer’s mother spoke yesterday” at her daughter’s memorial service, spokeswoman Lindsay Walters said.

“They tried to kill my child to shut her up, but guess what, you just magnified her,” Bro said at the service on Wednesday, according to the Associated Press. “I’d rather have my child, but by golly if I got to give her up, we’re going to make it count.”

The first call on Trump’s behalf looked like it came during the funeral, Bro said on ABC.

Heyer, 32, was killed when a man whom police have identified as James Alex Fields, Jr., 20 drove his car into a crowd of counter-protesters following the rally.

Political Fallout

The political fallout of Trump’s remarks about the white supremacists has spread this week, with key Republicans condemning him and CEO advisers abandoning him.

Trump at a news conference on Tuesday said not all of the people protesting the removal of a Charlottesville statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee were neo-Nazis or white supremacists.

“I think there’s blame on both sides,” Trump said. There were also “very fine people” on both sides, he said.

“Sad to see the history and culture of our great country being ripped apart” by the removal of statues honoring Confederate heroes, Trump added in a tweet Thursday.

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The Morning Brief: Spain Attacks, James Murdoch, The Defenders
Here's what's going on in the news Friday

Good morning. These are today’s top stories:

Spain attacks leave 14 dead as manhunt ensues

ISIS claimed responsibility for a pair of attacks in Spain that left at least 14 people dead and more than 100 injured. In the first assault in Barcelona, a van driver mowed down pedestrians on a popular tourist walkway. Hours later in Cambrils, another vehicle plowed into a police car and some civilians, according to the Associated Press. Authorities have made several arrests in connection with the two incidents, but they are still searching for the van driver in the first attack.

Fox’s James Murdoch slams Trump over Nazis

James Murdoch, the CEO of 21st Century Fox, has promised to give $1 million to the Anti-Defamation League, which aims to stop anti-Semitism. The pledge came as Murdoch blasted President Donald Trump for blaming “both sides” of the violence in Charlottesville, Va. “Standing up to Nazis is essential,” Murdoch wrote in an email to friends, according to the New York Times.

Marvel’s The Defenders is out on Netflix

Marvel’s The Defenders, a miniseries that revolves around four of Marvel’s biggest superheroes, premieres on Netflix today. The show features Daredevil (Charlie Cox), Jessica Jones (Krysten Ritter), Luke Cage (Mike Colter), Iron Fist (Finn Jones) and super-villain Alexandra (Sigourney Weaver).

Also:

Some Republicans assailed Trump after he defended Confederate monuments.

A student who attended the Charlottesville white supremacist rally has left Boston University after receiving backlash.

A new therapy may be able to cure children of peanut allergies.

7-Eleven will let you fill any cup you want with Slurpee for $1.50 today and tomorrow.

The Morning Brief is published Mondays through Fridays. Email Morning Brief writer Melissa Chan at melissa.chan@time.com.

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Think This Total Solar Eclipse Is Getting a Lot of Hype? You Should Have Seen 1878
The darkness of the eclipse lit up American minds more than a century ago

As Americans buy up special eclipse glasses and flock to one of the dozen states that will see a total solar eclipse on Monday, authorities have become concerned about whether there will be enough bathrooms, hotels, restaurants or supermarkets to sustain these tourists.

The hype surrounding this summer’s eclipse is “remarkably similar” to the kind that swept the U.S. in the walk-up to the eclipse of July 29, 1878, which was seen from the Montana territory to Texas, says David Baron, author of American Eclipse.

Astronomer Fredrich Bessel had finalized the math necessary to predict solar eclipses in 1824 and the transcontinental railroad had been built in 1869, so the ingredients were in place for a much-anticipated event. The U.S. Naval Observatory helped gin up enthusiasm by publishing a booklet of instructions, which included information about what to expect on the big day: “The following phenomena will be seen during the totality, if the sky is clear. Just as the sun’s last ray fades out, some glowing points of light will start into view, hanging upon the edge of the black moon and glistening like rubies; while surrounding the whole will be seen a halo whose mild radiance reminds the beholder of the glories with which the painters of old adorned the heads of saints.”

Eclipse-mania was on.

In June 1878, the Chicago Times began reporting of the “mammoth excursion from the [Great] lakes to the mountains.” In Denver, many businesses closed, and people poured into the streets. The Colorado Chieftain reported that the windows in church steeples that would face the eclipse had been leased for 50 cents, and tents in the Garden of the Gods public park sold for 25 cents each. Scientists from Princeton ended up “glamping,” as Baron puts it, in a grove of cottonwoods on the outskirts of Denver, where they had their own cook and a private launderer. The best view was at Pikes Peak, but it came at a price. Some scientists got to the area a week in advance to climb up and set up camp there, but were plagued by snowstorms and altitude sickness. Cleveland Abbe, known as the father of the National Weather Service, had to be carted out on a stretcher. Hotels ran out of rooms, and tourists who didn’t get a cot had to beg residents of private homes to let them stay. One man reportedly slept on a pool table. In the railroad town of Rawlins, Wyo., Thomas Edison had to share a room with New York Herald Tribune reporter Edwin Marshall Fox.

And the market for eclipse glasses — which at the time were made with shards of clear glass blackened over a candle or by fitting blue glass in the bottom of boxes or the tops of old stove pipe hats — saw a boom too: One Denver newsboy was believed to have made as much as $70 selling bootleg eclipse glasses.

Get your history fix in one place: sign up for the weekly TIME History newsletter

Yet nothing could prepare eclipse-watchers for what they did see when totality occurred in a sky that a Denver Times reporter stationed in Castle Rock described as “Weather splendid for eclipse — clear as hell.”

A Denver sheep herder said the scene looked like “a black carpet sliding over the plains,” while a Pikes Peak observer described it as “a rounded ball of darkness with an orange-yellow border fading into the light pea-green of the landscape,” according to Baron’s book. The Denver Daily Tribune reported, “Cheer after cheer echoed and re-echoed among the surrounding mountains,” and revelers on Grays Peak, a summit west of Denver, fired revolvers to celebrate and broke out into “My Country ‘Tis of Thee.” Another newspaper reported Coloradans were the “favored mortals of earth.”

But, while the event attracted notable scientists, no notable scientific discoveries came out of it. Edison brought a “tasimeter” he designed to detect heat at a distance to Wyoming, but it ended up not working well. And while astronomer and asteroid hunter James Craig Watson claimed he saw “Vulcan,” a planet between Mercury and the Sun said to only be visible during a total eclipse, now experts believe he probably just saw a star. (Vulcan only exists on Star Trek.)

In fact, news coverage suggests that the most significant “discovery” may have been the fact that women were interested in science.

Vassar College astronomer Maria Mitchell didn’t get funding for her trip to see the eclipse because she was a woman, but that didn’t stop her and five female scientists from going out to Denver to see it anyway — or as one reporter put it, “sweeping the heavens with a four-inch telescope” with her “assistant nymphs.” Another report described the sight of the all-female science expedition as “an attraction to the gaping, yet respectfully distant, multitude of masculines, almost as absorbing as the eclipse.” A few news articles did recognize the significance of their presence. The New York Sun reported, “The success of this party is one more and pointed arrow in the quiver of woman suffrage argument and logic.”

Today, because of the growth of air travel, globetrotters have more ways to travel to eclipse viewing sites and document the occurrence than ever before — but the sense of awe produced by feats of nature is timeless.

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Tina Fey Returns to SNL With Her Own Charlottesville Coping Strategy: Sheet Cake
She also shared her thoughts on President Trump and House Speaker Paul Ryan

Writer and comedian Tina Fey returned to Saturday Night Live for “Weekend Update: Summer Edition” on Thursday to share her advice for coping with anxiety people feel after Charlottesville: eat sheet cake.

“I know a lot of us are feeling anxious and asking ourselves, ‘What can I do?’” Fey said. “I would urge people this Saturday instead of participating in screaming matches and potential violence, find a local business you support. Maybe a Jewish bakery or an African-American run bakery? Order a cake with the American flag on it and… just eat it.”

Fey was then presented with a cake, continuing her point as she began to tuck into the mammoth dessert. “Next time you see a bunch of white boys in polo shirts screaming about ‘taking our country back,’ and you want to scream, ‘It’s not our country, we stole it from the Native Americans … don’t yell it at the Klan, yell it into the cake.”

Fey’s monologue quickly made waves across social media, sparking hashtags like ‘#sheetcakemovement’ and ‘#sheetcaking.’

A number of notable figures, including Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling, also chimed in to applaud Fey’s response, in which she did not hold back from bashing President Trump, House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (“you’re suppose to be the cool, young congressman but you don’t know how to @ someone on Twitter?”) and right-wing pundit Ann Coulter (who she described as a “yard-sale Barbie”).

“In conclusion,” Fey continued. “I really want to say, to encourage all good, sane Americans to treat these rallies this weekend like the opening of a thoughtful movie with two female leads. Don’t show up. Let these morons scream into the empty air.”

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These Are the Victims of the Spanish Terrorist Attacks
The people killed and injured in this week’s terrorist attacks in Spain hailed from 34 countries around the world, and the impact will be felt in every corner of the globe. On Friday morning, emergency services updated the death toll to 14, announcing that one woman had died after terrorists struck pedestrians in the coastal…

The people killed and injured in this week’s terrorist attacks in Spain hailed from 34 countries around the world, and the impact will be felt in every corner of the globe.

On Friday morning, emergency services updated the death toll to 14, announcing that one woman had died after terrorists struck pedestrians in the coastal town of Cambrils in the early hours of the morning. Earlier, a van had been driven through a crowd in the center of Barcelona, killing 13 and leaving scores of people wounded, many seriously.

U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said on Friday afternoon that one American had been killed in the attack, but no details of the victim’s identity have so far been released.

Three of the fatalities have so far been identified:

Bruno Gulotta

Italian retailer Tom’s Hardware confirmed that its employee Bruno Gulotta, a 35-year-old from Legnano in northern Italy, died in the Barcelona attack on Friday morning. He was reportedly on holiday with his wife, Maria, and their two young children.

“A photo from Cannes, one of the Ramblas in Barcelona. And then what no one expects: the death of a young man, father and life partner of the mother of his children,” one of his colleagues wrote in a statement. The company added that they were thinking of his eldest child who was due to start elementary school and his youngest, just seven months old, who “will never know her father”.

Elke Vanbockrijck

The 44-year-old Belgium national was on holiday in Barcelona with her husband and their two sons, aged 11 and 14, the Guardian reported. Patrick Dewael, the mayor of Tongeren, told Belgian radio that he had presided over her wedding in 2014 and sent his condolences.

Francisco López Rodríguez

The 57-year-old man, from Granada, was the first Spanish victim to be identified from the Barcelona attack. Spanish newspaper El Pais reported that his wife was seriously injured in the attack, her niece and a related three-year-old child are also reported to have died.

This is a breaking news story and will be updated as more information is made available

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How This Small Town Is Preparing to Become the ‘Solar Eclipse Crossroads of America’
Carbondale, Ill. will see two solar eclipses in the next decade - a very rare occurrence

Carbondale, Illinois — a college town of 26,000 — has spent the past three years gearing up for 2 minutes and 38 seconds on Monday, when the moon will slip completely in front of the sun, enveloping the region in the darkness of a total solar eclipse. The Great American Eclipse‘s totality phase will be longer in this rural Midwestern town than nearly anywhere else in the nation.

Southern Illinois University’s Saluki Stadium, the primary viewing location in town, will pack in 15,000 locals, visitors, scientists and students to watch the rare astronomical event unfold. Still more eclipse enthusiasts will spill out onto sidewalks, congregating in the downtown square, outside of city hall, and everywhere in between.

“This is the biggest event we’ve ever done,” SIU physics professor Bob Baer said. “It’s bigger than homecoming.”

Adding to the excitement is the fact that this won’t be Carbondale’s last eclipse. Seven years from now, on April 8, 2024, a second total solar eclipse will be visible again over the area — an extremely unusual happening that has inspired Carbondale residents to dub their town the “Solar Eclipse Crossroads of America.”

“Mother nature dropped this right in our lap,” Mayor John “Mike” Henry said. “There isn’t anything else we could possibly do to bring this many folks to Carbondale.”

The mayor’s office is closing schools on Monday to free up local parking. Churches are being converted into cooling stations. Locals are opening up their homes to outside visitors. “We’re thinking of it as [a Southern Illinois University] family weekend on steroids,” said longtime Carbondale resident Roxanne Conley, 58, who manages a screen-printing business in town and is vice president of Carbondale’s tourism bureau.

More visitors also means additional revenue for local businesses. “As most of rural America is experiencing, our economy is struggling,” says the town’s economic development director, Steven Mitchell. He predicts that an influx of 50,000 outsiders could bring in $8 million for Carbondale’s private sector.

Despite the town’s eclipse-day preparations, there are still a handful of factors that are out of anybody’s control. “Internet and wireless service will probably stall,” said Henry, “but we’ll do the best that we can with that.”

The biggest uncertainty, perhaps, is the number of people coming to observe the eclipse. Initially, NASA estimated that 50,000 to 90,000 people would descend on Carbondale this weekend.

State police now predict that upwards of 120,000 people could flock to Carbondale.

In response, city leaders have encouraged locals to treat the eclipse as though it were an impending natural disaster, which means stocking up on groceries, filling prescriptions, and loading up cars with a full tank of gas in advance.

But in reality there’s only so much the town can prepare for, said Randy Johnson, 58, who owns Carbondale’s 710 Book Store. “At some point you just have to get out of the way and let it happen.”

And no matter what, it will definitely happen. And then, in 2024, it will happen yet again.

“This is just our practice run,” Conley said. “Come back in seven years and we’ll have it figured out.”

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‘Art of the Deal’ Ghostwriter Thinks President Trump Will Resign Before the End of the Year
"The level of his destructiveness is staggering."

The ghostwriter of Donald Trump’s famous memoir The Art of the Deal doubled down on his prediction that Trump will resign the presidency before the end of the year.

“The snowball is beginning to gather momentum as it comes down the mountain,” Tony Schwartz told Anderson Cooper on CNN Thursday. “It reminds me a lot of Watergate and the last days of Nixon… He’s put himself in an isolated, no-win position. The level of his destructiveness is staggering.”

His television appearance echoed tweets he had published the day before saying Trump would resign office — and soon.

“The circle is closing at blinding speed,” Tony Schwartz, who CNN reports spent more than a year with Trump writing his 1987 memoir, tweeted August 16. “Trump is going to resign and declare victory before Mueller and congress leave him no choice.”

In a second tweet, he continued, “Trump’s presidency is effectively over. Would be amazed if he survives till end of the year. More likely resigns by fall, if not sooner.”

Schwartz has been an open critic of Trump during his political rise, previously predicting in May that he would resign and telling The New Yorker last year that he “a deep sense of remorse” for his role in Trump’s fame through Art of the Deal.

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