Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Thu, 14 Dec 2017 12:16:01 -0500

Nikki Haley Slams Iran’s Role In Yemen War, Neglects To Mention U.S. Part In Humanitarian Crisis

Nikki Haley Slams Iran’s Role In Yemen War, Neglects To Mention U.S. Part In Humanitarian CrisisThe U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley, stood before missile remnants that she claimed were covered in Iranian “fingerprints” on Thursday while laying out what she called “irrefutable evidence” that Tehran has violated its international obligations by militarily supporting rebels in Yemen.


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15 Most Stressful Jobs in the World

Everyone has a bad day at work now and then. But if you have one of these 15 Most Stressful Jobs in the World, even one bad day can get you or someone else killed. From EMT to Coal Miner to Ice Road Trucker, these are the jobs that will keep you up at nights!


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Herald Sun | Breaking News
last updated: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 22:01:00 GMT

Canal jumper released on bail
AN 18-year-old man who jumped into a canal at Surfers Paradise to avoid being arrested by police on Wednesday night has been granted bail.

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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Thu, 14 Dec 2017 03:30:39 -0500

Nikki Haley Slams Iran’s Role In Yemen War, Neglects To Mention U.S. Part In Humanitarian Crisis

Nikki Haley Slams Iran’s Role In Yemen War, Neglects To Mention U.S. Part In Humanitarian CrisisThe U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley, stood before missile remnants that she claimed were covered in Iranian “fingerprints” on Thursday while laying out what she called “irrefutable evidence” that Tehran has violated its international obligations by militarily supporting rebels in Yemen.


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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Wed, 13 Dec 2017 14:58:28 -0500

Nikki Haley Slams Iran’s Role In Yemen War, Neglects To Mention U.S. Part In Humanitarian Crisis

Nikki Haley Slams Iran’s Role In Yemen War, Neglects To Mention U.S. Part In Humanitarian CrisisThe U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley, stood before missile remnants that she claimed were covered in Iranian “fingerprints” on Thursday while laying out what she called “irrefutable evidence” that Tehran has violated its international obligations by militarily supporting rebels in Yemen.


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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Thu, 14 Dec 2017 14:27:04 -0500

Nikki Haley Slams Iran’s Role In Yemen War, Neglects To Mention U.S. Part In Humanitarian Crisis

Nikki Haley Slams Iran’s Role In Yemen War, Neglects To Mention U.S. Part In Humanitarian CrisisThe U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley, stood before missile remnants that she claimed were covered in Iranian “fingerprints” on Thursday while laying out what she called “irrefutable evidence” that Tehran has violated its international obligations by militarily supporting rebels in Yemen.


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Herald Sun | Top Stories
last updated: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 09:41:00 GMT

Response from Eddie, AFL not nearly enough
THERE'S so much wrong about the Eddie McGuire-James-Brayshaw-Danny Frawley pack mentality attack of Caroline Wilson. As was the AFL's insipid response on Monday.

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Secret tape not the only talking point
THE reasons behind a decision to release a secret expletive-laden recording of former Chief Justice Tim Carmody are almost as juicy as the tape is expected to be.

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Digg Top Stories
last updated: Fri, 15 Dec 2017 16:22:24 +0000

How Steven Seagal Became A Useful Puppet For Post-Soviet Dictators
Understanding Seagal’s strange pivot towards politics begins by understanding the various benefits world leaders have to gain by associating with him.

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Republicans finish tax bill, will release details later in day
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Republican negotiators in the U.S. Congress put the finishing touches on a sweeping tax overhaul and will release the details later on Friday, including plans for an expanded child tax credit aimed at winning the support of two wavering senators.

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BuzzFeed - Latest
last updated: Fri, 15 Dec 2017 17:13:37 -0500

Thanks For The Memeories 😭

Here Are 38 Great Memes That Defined 2017


View Entire Post ›

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TIME
last updated:

This Couple Lost 8 Family Members in the Texas Church Massacre. But They’re Still Finding Joy at Christmas
"It won’t be long until we’ll be there with the rest of the family," Joe, 86, said

Joe and Claryce Holcombe’s big Texas family always sprawled on Christmas Day – their children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren spread out across the small towns near where they live. But they all came together for Christmas dinner.

This year, there will be eight fewer loved ones at the dinner table.

The Holcombes, age 86 and 85, lost eight family members, three generations of the Holcombe family, in a matter of minutes when a gunman opened fire at First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs during Sunday services on Nov. 5. In all, 26 people were murdered.

Their son Bryan, 60, is now gone; so is their daughter-in-law Karla 58; their grandson Danny, 36; their pregnant granddaughter-in-law Crystal, 36; and four great-grandchildren: Noah, 18 months, Greg Hill, 13, Emily Hill, 11, and Megan Hill, 9.

Even in the face of this unspeakable tragedy, Joe Holcombe – who goes by “Papa Joe” – says there will still be joy at Christmas this year.

“We probably won’t have as much Christmas as we usually do, but we’ll have plenty,” he said. “It’s something definitely worth celebrating.”

He added: “Everybody always wants us to be whimpering and crying because we lost some of our family. That’s not the way we are. It happened and it hurt. But we don’t look at death as separation. We look at it as just another event in our life.”

Propelled by their Christian faith, Holcombe and his wife say they find comfort in knowing their loved ones are in heaven. And they hope to be reunited there with them soon. “It won’t be long until we’ll be there with the rest of the family,” he said. “I miss my family. We don’t see them coming down the sidewalk at the front door anymore. But I won’t miss them long.”

It’s difficult for Holcombe to predict how he will feel on Christmas when eight family members are absent from the day’s festivities, but he said, “I’m sure it will be hard this year, but we’ll get over that too because it won’t last long.”

The Holcombes, married for more than 60 years, had no idea what had happened on Nov. 5 until a pastor from their own church in Floresville paid them a rare visit and broke the news of their family members’ deaths – one-by-one.

“Bryan?” Holcombe recalled asking, about his son, who was filling in as a guest preacher that day.

“He’s dead,” the pastor said.

“Karla?” he asked about his daughter-in-law.

“She’s dead,” the pastor replied.

Husband Bryan Holcombe and wife Karla Plain Holcombe, victims of the mass shooting at the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, are seen in this photo obtained Nov. 6, 2017.
Social Media/ReutersHusband Bryan Holcombe and wife Karla Plain Holcombe, victims of the mass shooting at the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, are seen in this photo obtained Nov. 6, 2017.

Ten days later, when the Holcombes had to bury their dead, they made sure to lay grandson Marc Daniel “Danny” Holcombe in the same casket as his daughter Noah. The toddler was wrapped in her father’s arms when they were both gunned down.

“They were buried together and they were shot together,” Holcombe said. “It was fitting.”

The horror of the Holcombes’ sudden loss moved people across the country – an estimated 3,000 showed up to mourn at a funeral service near the church on Nov. 15. The loss was unimaginable to millions of Americans, who watched news of the shooting unfold from their televisions and phoned. But, the Holcombes emerged from the tragedy with unrelenting positivity.

The Holcombes leave their Christmas tree up all year, mostly because they don’t have a place to store it. The family usually gathered for dinner with friends at Bryan and his wife Karla’s house on Christmas. “The house was full, gee whiz,” Holcombe recalled.

This year, Holcombe plans to stay home. He expects visitors, since “there’s always somebody coming by,” and he said he will probably take a nap. He and his wife will not be visiting the cemetery where their loved ones are buried because he said their souls are no longer with them. “There’s a dead body, but they’re not ours anymore,” he said. “We know ours are in heaven.”

Joe and Claryce Holcombe recently filed a legal claim with the U.S. Air Force, saying mistakes by the military branch eventually led shooter Devin Kelley to be able to buy the weapons he used in the massacre. “I don’t hold what happened against anyone,” said Joe Holcombe. But he said the legal action needed to be taken to prevent other deaths. (The Air Force did not immediately comment on the claim.)

Ahead of the holidays, the couple remembers the loved ones they lost as people who deeply loved Jesus and each other.

“That’s what we all should do,” Holcombe said. “We’ll never forget them.”

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Barack Obama Dressed Up As Too-Cool-For-School Santa For His Latest Appearance
Barack Obama has long made it clear that he loves his post-presidency leather jacket. And on Thursday, he took that leather jacket with him on his visit to a D.C.-area Boys & Girls Club to visit kids — topping off his fashion-forward look with a festive, seasonally-appropriate red Santa hat. “There’s no better time than…

Barack Obama has long made it clear that he loves his post-presidency leather jacket. And on Thursday, he took that leather jacket with him on his visit to a D.C.-area Boys & Girls Club to visit kids — topping off his fashion-forward look with a festive, seasonally-appropriate red Santa hat.

“There’s no better time than the holiday season to reach out and give back to our communities,” he shared on Twitter, along with a photo of the visit. “Great to hear from young people at the Boys & Girls Club in DC today.”

The former president was popping by a branch of the Boys & Girls Club of Greater Washington in one of his recent visits to local kids, chatting with about 50 students there and dropping off gifts for them as well, the Washington Post reports. (You can even see him carrying around a giant sack of gifts as he shakes hands with the excited, screaming kids. Quite a Santa substitute, indeed.)

Obama may not be in the Oval Office any longer, but he’s been keeping busy: besides launching the Obama Foundation, reporting for jury duty, and making appearances like this one, he also contributed his voice to the recently successful Doug Jones campaign for Senate. He and Michelle decided to stay in D.C. following the end of his term as president, and currently live in the same neighborhood as Ivanka Trump and her husband Jared Kushner.

 

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Peter Jackson: Harvey Weinstein Made Me Blacklist Accusers Ashley Judd and Mira Sorvino
"There it is, confirmation that Harvey Weinstein derailed my career," Sorvino tweeted.

The Lord of the Rings director Peter Jackson said he suspects Harvey Weinstein‘s company fed him information to discourage him from working with Ashley Judd and Mira Sorvino, two of the dozens of women who have publicly accused the producer of sexual misconduct this year.

In an interview with New Zealand news website Stuff, Jackson said that he didn’t have direct knowledge of the allegations against Weinstein. But he now believes the Weinstein brothers, who originally controlled the rights to The Lord of the Rings series at Miramax, convinced him not to cast Judd and Sorvino.

“I recall Miramax telling us they were a nightmare to work with and we should avoid them at all costs. This was probably in 1998,” Jackson said. “At the time, we had no reason to question what these guys were telling us – but in hindsight, I realise that this was very likely the Miramax smear campaign in full swing… I now suspect we were fed false information about both of these talented women – and as a direct result their names were removed from our casting list.”

A spokesperson for Weinstein did not immediately respond to TIME’s request for comment about Jackson’s comments. Weinstein has repeatedly denied “any allegations of non-consensual sex,” but acknowledged in October that “the way I’ve behaved with colleagues in the past has caused a lot of pain, and I sincerely apologize for it.”

Sorvino and Judd responded to Jackson on Twitter. “There it is, confirmation that Harvey Weinstein derailed my career,” Sorvino wrote. “I’m just heartsick.”

Judd and Sorvino are among dozens of women who have accused Weinstein of sexual misconduct. Many of the women said that they believed rejecting Weinstein’s advances hurt their careers.

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J. K. Rowling Wrote the Hogwarts Houses in a Very Unconventional Way and 3 Other Things We Learned
Proof that inspiration can come from anywhere

Whether she’s taking Piers Morgan to task or trolling President Donald Trump, J.K. Rowling’s Twitter is an endless source of joy and delight for her fans and a recent tweet spree was no exception. The Harry Potter author took to her Twitter account on Friday morning to dispense some valuable writing advice and to share the rather unconventional origin of the Hogwarts Houses.

While retweeting a thread disputing myths on what “real writers” do, Rowling confirmed that all “real” writers have different and unique practices that help them be productive and that one of the ways that she works best is by usually carrying a notebook with her. However, Rowling also revealed that one of her best written ideas — the beloved Hogwarts Houses — wasn’t jotted down in a notebook, but instead scribbled on an airplane sick bag, which is proof that inspiration really can come from anywhere.

Rowling also shared that she thought that everyone had a good story in them to share, but that didn’t necessarily mean that everyone is a writer. Read her full tweets below.

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Can a Former Apprentice Contestant Sue President Trump? Legal Experts Disagree
Summer Zervos, a former Apprentice contestant who claims Donald Trump sexually assaulted her in 2007, is suing the president in state court for defamation. But now that Trump is in the White House, the suit raises an important new question: can someone bring a civil lawsuit in state court against the President of the United…

Summer Zervos, a former Apprentice contestant who claims Donald Trump sexually assaulted her in 2007, is suing the president in state court for defamation. But now that Trump is in the White House, the suit raises an important new question: can someone bring a civil lawsuit in state court against the President of the United States?

Trump’s lawyers say no. “State court can’t exercise any control over the president under any circumstances,” Trump’s lawyer Marc Kasowitz argued in New York state court in early December. The motion to dismiss the case, Kasowitz continued, is about “protecting the ability of the president to do his constitutionally mandated job.”

In court filings, Trump’s team has cited the Supreme Court’s 1982 decision in Nixon v. Fitzgerald, which held that the president has “absolute immunity” from being held liable for damages in civil lawsuits for conduct within the “outer perimeter” of his official presidential duties. “Because of the singular importance of the President’s duties,” the decision reads, “diversion of his energies by concern with private lawsuits would raise unique risks to the effective functioning of government.”

This is a key element of Trump’s lawyers’ argument for why he can’t be sued in state court. But there are limits to the holding in Nixon v. Fitzgerald as it’s concerned here: the case only applied to civil suits in federal court, not state court, and only to civil suits related to official actions as president, not personal conduct.

Zervos is seeking an apology and at least $2,914 in damages from Trump in the lawsuit she filed, which states that she “has suffered as a direct result of Mr. Trump’s false, defamatory statements, both emotionally and financially.” During the presidential campaign, Trump said Zervos and other women who accused him of sexual misconduct were lying and suggested Hillary Clinton’s campaign brought them forward.

It’s a later Supreme Court case, 1997’s Clinton v. Jones, that introduces private acts to the patchwork of laws on presidents and civil lawsuits. This time, 15 years after the prior decision, facing a case in which former Arkansas state employee Paula Jones accused President Bill Clinton of sexual harassment, the Supreme Court said the Nixon v. Fitzgerald ruling on immunity from civil damages did not apply to “unofficial conduct” by the president.

“We have never suggested that the President, or any other official, has an immunity that extends beyond the scope of any action taken in an official capacity,” the Court held. “The litigation of questions that relate entirely to the unofficial conduct of the individual who happens to be the President poses no perceptible risk of misallocation of either judicial power or executive power.”

This decision is good for Zervos’ team, ruling definitively that presidents can be sued while in office for private conduct.

Clinton v. Jones makes clear that this Defendant is not entitled to qualified immunity — or any other species of official acts [of] immunity — because this case involved unofficial conduct by Defendant before he assumed office,” Zervos’ lawyers said in a court filing earlier this year. “Precisely because Defendant’s underlying tortious behavior has nothing to do with his current duties or office, and because it occurred before he took that office, he does not have immunity from suit.”

But again, there’s a critical unanswered question in the Clinton v. Jones opinion: that case only applies to litigation in federal court, and did not decide the issue of whether a civil suit can be brought against a sitting president in state court.

In fact, the Supreme Court made it an explicit point not to rule on that question, explaining that state court suits could raise different legal questions than the ones decided in Clinton v. Jones. “Because the Supremacy Clause makes federal law “the supreme Law of the Land,” any direct control by a state court over the President, who has principal responsibility to ensure that those laws are ‘faithfully executed,’ may implicate concerns that are quite different from the interbranch separation of powers questions addressed here,” the majority opinion notes in a footnote.

The power difference between state and federal court arises in part from the Supremacy Clause of the Constitution, which establishes that federal law is supreme and prohibits states from interfering in federal functions. But in civil suits, “there’s no absolute immunity from being sued in state court for a president,” explains Samuel Issacharoff, constitutional law professor at New York University Law School. He gives the example of if a president and his or her spouse wanted to get a divorce while in office — that would be handled in state court.

“Divorce matrimonial matters are not actionable in federal court, and it is inconceivable that we would make [the spouse] wait four or eight years [to get a divorce],” Issacharoff says. “The ordinary conduct of the life of the president as an individual may give rise to legal issues, and we’ve never said that there’s immunity from that.”

And some legal experts think that footnote was merely standard practice by the Supreme Court to limit the scope of its ruling on a constitutional issue, and that there’s no reason to think the Court wouldn’t have decided the case the same way had it been a state court in question.

“There’s nothing in the opinion that would militate heavily against the same type of process in state court,” says George Washington University Law School professor Jonathan Turley. “Indeed, one could argue that the federal system has a greater likelihood to recognize a form of immunity than the state system. Under federalism principles, these are two different systems, and the state system has its own independent authority and right to pursue defendants.”

So as it stands now, Trump cannot be held liable for civil damages in conduct related to his presidential powers, but he can be held liable in federal court for civil damages related to his personal conduct before he became president. And if any presidency will lead to a clear decision on whether he can be subject to a civil suit on personal conduct in state court, there’s good reason to think it might be Trump’s.

“President Trump came to office dragging a long chain of existing civil lawsuits,” says Turley. “No president has come to office with as much experience as a litigant as President Trump.”

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2017 Set a Record For Journalists Going To Jail
These are today's best ideas

1. 2017 set a record for journalists going to jail for reporting the news.

By Elana Beiser at the Committee to Protect Journalists

2. This is what public libraries will lose without net neutrality.

By Kaitlyn Tiffany at the Verge

3. Could these plants someday replace the lamps in your home?

By Anne Trafton at MIT

4. Careful use of radiation could fix a deadly heart rhythm — noninvasively.

By Julia Evangelou Strait at Washington University in St. Louis

5. Millennials will inherit the worst U.S. economy since the Great Depression.

By Michael Hobbes in Huffington Post Highline

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

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The Internet Is Bonding Over Embarrassing Screen Names As AIM Signs Off Forever
AIM screen names are gone, but definitely not forgotten

Before there was Snapchat, WhatsApp, Instagram messaging, or iChat, there was AIM, AOL’s instant messenger service and it was the best way for ’90s and ’00s teens to chat with friends, find like-minded Sonic the Hedgehog or Rancid fans, flirt with strangers, generally get awkward, and make all kinds of AIMemories. Since times—and technology— have changed, the service signed off for the last time on December 15, 20 years after it launched, and the internet is throwing a nostalgia-fueled wake.

Those who knew and loved the service are raiding their teenage diaries and sharing their AIM screen names and they are a delightful time capsule of wannabe cool, laugh-out-loud awkward, hindsight-is-embarrassing ’90s gems. Check out this list of classic screen names as a final away message to the service that started it all.

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Democrats Are Excited by Doug Jones’ Win. But They Still Face a Tough Fight Next Year
The map favors Republicans

After Doug Jones’ unexpected win in the Alabama Senate race Tuesday night, jubilant Democrats could hardly contain their enthusiasm about what it means for next year’s midterm elections.

The upset win in deeply conservative Alabama, which hasn’t had a Democratic senator in two decades, reduced the Republican majority in the upper chamber to 51 while also showing that Democrats could compete in states they haven’t done well in recently.

“Senate Republicans are rushing to duck responsibility and blame all of their problems on Roy Moore,” the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee wrote in a memo Thursday. “But make no mistake: the same trends that our counterparts want to gloss over are emerging in Senate races across the country.”

But the optimism masks a tough reality, at least in the Senate. In 2018, Democrats will be defending 26 seats, including two independents who caucus with them. Ten of those seats are in states President Trump won in 2016, and five are in states where he won by over 15 percentage points. Republicans, on the other hand, are only defending eight seats.

Republicans have seized on this dynamic, targeting Missouri and Indiana, state where President Donald Trump won handily last year and Sens. Claire McCaskill and Joe Donnelly are running for reelection, as two of the most optimal opportunities to turn the Senate seats red. On visits to tout his tax reform plan, President Trump specifically called out McCaskill and Donnelly, telling the crowds to vote them out of office if they don’t support the plan. Neither of them have.

In order for Democrats to take control, they’ll need to push back hard against these forces, keeping all of their seats in contention and flip an additional two.

Still, Democrats argued it’s within reach.

“Obviously, Senate Democrats face a very challenging map, but Republicans are facing expensive and divisive primaries and an electorate that is repulsed by their agenda,” said an aide to the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee. “We are running with strong incumbents and challengers, and are preparing to take advantage of every opportunity we can.”

Chris Pack, a spokesman for the Senate Majority Fund, a SuperPac aligned with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, told TIME that while the environment was undeniably tough for Republicans, the electoral map gives the party an advantage.

“It’s such a great map for us this cycle; I don’t think it’s been this favorable to Republicans when you have the president and the same party [in control of the Senate] in decades,” he said. “It will be a tough climate but the map is so favorable.”

There is also the possibility that Republicans become even more energized following Jones’ victory. Some of the most potentially competitive races, like Arizona and Nevada, include insurgent primary challengers — Kelli Ward in Arizona and Danny Tarkanian in Nevada — who are backed by Steve Bannon and embody the populist conservative grassroots movement, similar to Alabama’s Republican candidate, Roy Moore. It is likely that Republicans will go into overdrive to ensure more centrist candidates prevail in the primaries.

Although the Senate Leadership Fund has yet to detail its strategy, it has already released an ad blasting Ward and slammed Tarkanian on Twitter after he challenged Heller to sign a pledge replacing McConnell as Senate Majority Leader.

“We will play in primaries because we think it’s important to get candidates through their primaries who can win in November when it counts,” said Pack.

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Matt Lauer’s First Accuser Lives in ‘Constant Fear’ of Being Discovered, Lawyer Says
The attorney for the woman who first came forward to complain of Matt Lauer’s inappropriate sexual behavior said she lives “in constant fear that people are going to track her down and figure out who she is.” In an interview with NBC’s Today on Friday morning, attorney Ari Wilkenfeld said NBC wasn’t doing enough to…

The attorney for the woman who first came forward to complain of Matt Lauer’s inappropriate sexual behavior said she lives “in constant fear that people are going to track her down and figure out who she is.”

In an interview with NBC’s Today on Friday morning, attorney Ari Wilkenfeld said NBC wasn’t doing enough to protect his client’s identity. He didn’t specify how he believed the network had put her anonymity in jeopardy. A spokesperson for NBC News told Today: “the network has protected the employee’s anonymity all along and will continue to do so.”

“There’s a hunt underway to figure out who she is,” Wilkenfeld said. “And I think that’s going to have a chilling effect on other women who might want to come forward and tell their stories.”

On Nov. 29, NBC announced it fired Lauer after receiving the woman’s complaint. The specifics of the woman’s allegations have not been made public. Variety and the New York Times later reported additional allegations of sexual harassment and sexual assault against Lauer. In a statement on Nov. 30, Lauer said that some of the allegations were untrue or mischaracterized, but said “there is enough truth in these stories to make me feel embarrassed and ashamed.”

Meanwhile, another woman has detailed her own experience with the former Today show co-anchor. On Thursday, Variety published a first-person account from Addie Zinone, who said that she had a consensual relationship with Lauer when she was a 24-year-old production assistant on Today. Zinone said that the month-long relationship began after Lauer took her to lunch to give her professional advice. They later had a consensual encounter in one of the studio’s dressing rooms.

Lauer has not commented on Zinone’s essay. His attorney did not immediately respond to TIME’s request for comment.

“I’m putting my name and face out there to squash any doubts about the allegations from other women against Matt Lauer. I’m validating their stories because some of our experiences are similar,” Zinone wrote. “I want these women to know that I believe them, I want to help empower them and collectively we have a voice to change things.”

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President Trump Bashed the FBI Again. An Hour Later, He Praised Its Agents as ‘Heroes’
He said people were "very angry," then called agents "great, great people"

President Trump praised FBI agents as “great people” and “heroes for all of us” at a graduation less than an hour after criticizing the agency to reporters on the South Lawn of the White House.

In a speech to the FBI National Academy’s graduating class, Trump argued that America should do more to protect and respect law enforcement officials, even calling for the death penalty for people who harm them.

“Being a police officer is not just a career, it’s a calling,” he said. “And I’ve seen it. I have so many friends who are police officers, so many people in the FBI. These are great people. These are really heroes for all of us.”

Just before heading over to give the speech, Trump spoke to reporters at the White House, saying that he was not yet ready to talk about pardoning former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn, who pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI, and criticizing the agency.

“Let’s see, I can say this: When you look at what’s gone on with the FBI and the Justice Department, people are very, very angry,” he said.

Earlier in the week, Trump tweeted that the agency’s reputation was “in tatters.”

In the past, Trump has repeatedly said that the FBI flubbed its investigation into Hillary Clinton’s private email server and other controversies involving the former Secretary of State and presidential candidate. His supporters have also pointed to text messages sent by two senior FBI officials who investigated the Trump campaign in which they describe the prospect of him winning as “terrifying.”

But Trump had nothing but praise in his speech to graduates.

“You very rarely you get the recognition you deserve,” he told the agents at Quantico. “We as a country must do a better job showing our police officers the respect and gratitude you deserve.”

 

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