Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Thu, 22 Jun 2017 00:00:00 -0400

‘American democracy is under attack’: Sanders urges vigilance against Trump’s ‘authoritarianism’

‘American democracy is under attack’: Sanders urges vigilance against Trump’s ‘authoritarianism’Bernie Sanders delivered his scathing critique of the Trump administration in a speech discussing the threat of authoritarianism in the U.S. and elsewhere.


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15 Most Stressful Jobs in the World

Everyone has a bad day at work now and then. But if you have one of these 15 Most Stressful Jobs in the World, even one bad day can get you or someone else killed. From EMT to Coal Miner to Ice Road Trucker, these are the jobs that will keep you up at nights!


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Herald Sun | Breaking News
last updated: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 22:01:00 GMT

Canal jumper released on bail
AN 18-year-old man who jumped into a canal at Surfers Paradise to avoid being arrested by police on Wednesday night has been granted bail.

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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Fri, 23 Jun 2017 11:03:54 -0400

‘American democracy is under attack’: Sanders urges vigilance against Trump’s ‘authoritarianism’

‘American democracy is under attack’: Sanders urges vigilance against Trump’s ‘authoritarianism’Bernie Sanders delivered his scathing critique of the Trump administration in a speech discussing the threat of authoritarianism in the U.S. and elsewhere.


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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Fri, 23 Jun 2017 12:55:48 -0400

‘American democracy is under attack’: Sanders urges vigilance against Trump’s ‘authoritarianism’

‘American democracy is under attack’: Sanders urges vigilance against Trump’s ‘authoritarianism’Bernie Sanders delivered his scathing critique of the Trump administration in a speech discussing the threat of authoritarianism in the U.S. and elsewhere.


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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Fri, 23 Jun 2017 16:37:00 -0400

Four GOP senators: We won’t vote for new health care bill

Four GOP senators: We won’t vote for new health care billIn a potentially game-changing move, four conservative senators quickly announced Thursday afternoon that they oppose the health care bill rolled out by Republican Senate leadership earlier in the day. Ted Cruz, R-Texas and Ron Johnson, R-Wis. said in a statement that the proposal did not go far enough to overhaul the current system. “There are provisions in this draft that represent an improvement to our current health care system, but it does not appear that this draft as written will accomplish the most important promise that we made to the Americans: to repeal Obamacare and lower their health care costs,” the group said in the release.


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Herald Sun | Top Stories
last updated: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 09:41:00 GMT

Response from Eddie, AFL not nearly enough
THERE'S so much wrong about the Eddie McGuire-James-Brayshaw-Danny Frawley pack mentality attack of Caroline Wilson. As was the AFL's insipid response on Monday.

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Secret tape not the only talking point
THE reasons behind a decision to release a secret expletive-laden recording of former Chief Justice Tim Carmody are almost as juicy as the tape is expected to be.

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Digg Top Stories
last updated: Fri, 23 Jun 2017 19:21:03 +0000

The Tragedy Of FireWire
The rise and fall of FireWire is one of the most tragic tales in the history of computer technology. The standard was forged in the fires of collaboration — and then Apple killed it.

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If Baghdadi is dead, next IS leader likely to be Saddam-era officer
BAGHDAD (Reuters) - If Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi is confirmed dead, he is likely to be succeeded by one of his top two lieutenants, both of whom were Iraqi army officers under late dictator Saddam Hussein.

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BuzzFeed - Latest
last updated: Mon, 19 Jun 2017 23:16:06 -0400

“I Wanted To Go Home”

How Accusing A Powerful Man of Rape Drove A College Student To Suicide


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TIME
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Disability Advocates Forcibly Removed From Senate Protest Say It Was Worth It: ‘We Have the Right to Live’
"These Medicaid cuts will force people into institutions who don’t need to be there"

Stephanie Woodward, a disability advocate who was forcibly removed from the U.S. Capitol while protesting the controversial Senate health care bill on Thursday, said it was worth it because “the lives of millions of people with disabilities are on the line.”

“I genuinely believe that thousands, if not millions, more people in our nation now know about the crisis that people with disabilities are facing with these cuts,” said Woodward, director of advocacy at the Center for Disability Rights in Rochester, N.Y. “And if being arrested and carried out is what needed to happen in order to get people to pay attention to this issue and get angry about it and start calling their Senators, then it was completely worth it.”

Woodward, who has spina bifida, got out of her wheelchair to participate in a “die-in” organized by the disability rights organization ADAPT outside Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s office. Protesters chanted against the bill’s significant proposed cuts to Medicaid — which could affect the community services available to people with disabilities.

Woodward, who was arrested along with several dozen other protesters, said officers who broke up the demonstration initially put her back in her wheelchair, but they struggled to wheel her out and ultimately carried her out instead.

Jacquelyn Martin—APStephanie Woodward, of Rochester, N.Y., who has spina bifida and uses a wheelchair, is removed from a sit-in at Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s office as she and other disability rights advocates protest proposed funding caps to Medicaid, on June 22, 2017, on Capitol Hill in Washington.

“They at first were reluctant to touch me because they had seen I was wearing leg braces, so I think they thought I was extra fragile, so they waited to carry me out last from the office,” said Woodward, 29, who was charged with incommoding, or obstructing. “And I was not actively being aggressive or resisting, but I certainly wasn’t going to help them in the process. I acted more like a sandbag that just kind of flopped.”

Dawn Russell, who was born with cerebral palsy, also participated in Thursday’s protest. She said one of the most concerning parts of the current health care debate is a lack of public understanding about how the proposed legislation could affect nearly every part of disabled people’s lives.

“We have a perception of people with disabilities in this country, and we have a mindset that somehow our lives aren’t valued. And I can promise you, with the home and community-based services that I receive, I would dare put my life up against anybody without a disability,” said Russell, 51.

“Without those services — without the home and community-based services — I am just what people think about me, as a person with a disability. But with these services, I live a life. I live independently, interdependently, in the community just like everybody else. These services allow me to do that.”

She said had it not been for Medicaid, she would have entered a nursing home when her husband died in 2015. Instead, she receives daily attendant care in her home, helping her to get ready for work in the morning and go to bed at night.

“We have the right to live,” Woodward said. “And by live, I don’t mean just breathe. I mean be a part of the American dream, be in the community, raise a family, go to work. These Medicaid cuts will force people into institutions who don’t need to be there.”

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Second Mistrial Declared in Racially-Charged Police Murder Trial
The jury was deadlocked after 30 hours of deliberation

CINCINNATI (AP) — A second mistrial was declared Friday in the case of a white University of Cincinnati officer who killed an unarmed black motorist during a traffic stop. It’s the latest racially charged police shooting case to show the reluctance of U.S. jurors to convict officers.

Hamilton County Judge Leslie Ghiz declared a mistrial after more than 30 hours of jury deliberations over five days. The jurors had said earlier Friday that they were unable to reach a verdict in Officer Ray Tensing’s trial, but Ghiz had sent them back to try again on the counts of murder and voluntary manslaughter.

Instead, they sent her another note some three hours later, saying: “We are almost evenly split regarding our votes.” The note said they didn’t foresee reaching a unanimous verdict.

Tensing looked down, his hand on his face, as the judge announced the mistrial over the death of 43-year-old Sam DuBose, who was shot in the head while driving away from the traffic stop on July 19, 2015. Tensing and his family left quickly without comment.

The first trial against the 27-year-old Tensing also ended in a mistrial after the jury deliberated 25 hours over four days in November without reaching a verdict.

The case is among several across the country in recent years that have raised attention to how police deal with blacks.

A jury last week acquitted a Minnesota officer who fatally shot Philando Castile during a traffic stop. And jurors on Wednesday acquitted a black police officer of first-degree reckless homicide in the death of a black Milwaukee man who threw away the gun he was carrying during a brief foot chase after a traffic stop.

The NAACP of Cincinnati blasted the hung jury result and said they will demand justice.

“The message that is being sent is, if you are black, all the police officer has to do is say they were in fear of their life and they get away with murder because the victim (is) black,” the local NAACP said in a statement.

Prosecutors will have to decide whether to try Tensing for a third time. A spokeswoman for the county prosecutor, Joe Deters, said he won’t comment until next week.

Ghiz had rejected a prosecution request late in the trial to allow jurors to consider a lesser charge of reckless homicide, saying prosecutors could have done that after the first mistrial.

DuBose’s family said in a statement that they want a new trial and they urged that protests remain peaceful.

Dozens of demonstrators were outside the courthouse with rain coming down Friday afternoon, some chanting: “Black lives matter!”

After the first mistrial last year, about 1,000 protesters marched through downtown on Nov. 12, chanting, “Black lives matter, Sam’s life matters.” The crowd briefly blocked a streetcar line and grew in numbers when they were joined by people leaving a rally opposing the election of Donald Trump as president.

As in his first trial, Tensing testified in his own defense and said his arm was pinned inside DuBose’s car when DuBose tried to speed away. Tensing was in tears during both trials as he testified he feared he could be dragged or run over by the car.

“I meant to stop the threat,” he told jurors last week. “I didn’t shoot to kill him. I didn’t shoot to wound him. I shot to stop his actions.”

Prosecutors said repeatedly the evidence contradicted Tensing’s story. An expert hired by prosecutors said his frame-by-frame analysis of the former officer’s body camera video showed the officer was not being dragged by the car.

This jury had nine whites and three blacks. His first trial had 10 whites and two blacks.

The University of Cincinnati fired Tensing last year after his indictment. It restructured its public safety department and made other policing reforms. The university reached a $5.3 million settlement with DuBose’s family, including free undergraduate tuition for DuBose’s 13 children.

To convict Tensing of murder, jurors had to find he purposely killed DuBose. The charge carries a possible sentence of 15 years to life in prison.

The voluntary manslaughter charge means killing during sudden passion or a fit of rage. That carries a possible sentence of three to 11 years.

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SeaWorld Is Under Investigation for Statements Made About Blackfish
The film dealt with captive orca whales

SeaWorld Entertainment has been subpoenaed by the U.S. Department of Justice for public statements regarding the impact of the documentary Blackfish.

In a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission posted late Friday, the company said it received a subpoena in connection with a Justice Department investigation concerning “disclosures and public statements” made by certain executives and individuals on or before August 2014 about the 2013 documentary and trading in the company’s securities.

SeaWorld in August 2014 reported that its revenue had fallen amidst criticism of its treatment of captive orca whales, the subject of the movie Blackfish. At the time, the company said the decline in revenue was due in part to negative reports about its treatment of the whales. SeaWorld’s profits tumbled further in 2015.

According to the filing, SeaWorld also received subpoenas from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission regarding the same material. SeaWorld said it formed a special committee of independent directors to deal with the inquiries.

A SeaWorld spokesperson told TIME the filing “covers everything the company has to say regarding the government inquiries.”

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Here Is Every Republican Senator Who Opposes the Health Care Bill
And why they're against their party's legislation

Five Republican Senators so far oppose Mitch McConnell’s health care bill, saying they can’t support the legislation as written.

Democrats are expected to unanimously vote against the bill. That means Republicans can only afford two defections for the legislation to pass.

With five Republican Senators already in opposition and more than a dozen signaling wariness, a legislative victory is anything but a sure thing.

Here’s a rundown of the Republican Senators who oppose the bill and why:

Who opposes the bill?

Sens. Ted Cruz, Ron Johnson, Rand Paul, Mike Lee said publicly on Thursday that they are not ready to vote for the bill as is, although they are open to negotiations to change it.

Nevada Sen. Dean Heller on Friday became the fifth person to oppose the bill, saying that he could not support the current draft either.

Why are they against the bill?

In a joint statement, Cruz, Johnson, Paul and Lee said they oppose the bill because it does not fully repeal the Affordable Care Act.

“There are provisions in this draft that represent an improvement to our current health care system but it does not appear this draft as written will accomplish the most important promise that we made to Americans: to repeal Obamacare and lower their health care costs,” reads the statement.

Heller echoed his colleagues’ sentiments on Friday. “It’s simply not the answer,” he said at a news conference, CNN reports. “And I’m announcing today that in this form, I simply will not support it.”

What would have to change to gain their support?

The Senators who oppose the bill thus far want a full repeal of the Affordable Care Act, a crowning legislative achievement of Barack Obama’s presidency. They also say the draft legislation does not do enough to lower health care premiums.

“That should be the central issue for Republicans — repealing Obamacare and making healthcare more affordable,” said Cruz in a statement to CNN.

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Nike’s Latest Campaign Stars Vogue Dancing Legend Leiomy Maldonado
She's known as "the Wonder Woman of Vogue"

To celebrate Pride Month and honor the LGBTQ community, Nike released a video campaign that not only acknowledges vogue dancing as a sport but also pays homage to a voguing legend, Amazon Mother Leiomy Maldonado, who’s been called “the Wonder Woman of Vogue.”

The video shows Maldonado practicing, training, dancing, and performing by herself and others, while an emotional narration asks questions like “What did you do to make a mark on this world? What mountains did you climb?” while describing about her journey as a dancer. Maldonado, an icon in the New York City “Ballroom scene,” was the first transgender woman to appear on MTV’s America’s Best Dance Crew. According to Mashable, transgender artist Precious Angel Ramirez did the voiceover higlighting Maldonado’s journey.

The campaign is part of a larger commitment by the sportswear brand to be inclusive with an “Equality” initiative; other campaigns include a commercial featuring women athletes in hijabs and a politically charged ad spot that addressed systemic inequality.

Watch the full clip below.

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‘The Grenfell Fire Changes Everything’: 800 London Homes Evacuated Over Safety Concerns
Repairs are expected to take two to four weeks

(LONDON) — A local London council has decided to evacuate some 800 households in apartment buildings it owns because of safety concerns following the devastating fire that killed 79 people in a west London high-rise.

British Prime Minister Theresa May has tweeted that her thoughts are with hundreds of public housing residents who are being evacuated because of fire safety concerns.

May said Friday that “she will work with and support the emergency services and relevant authorities to safeguard the public.”

She says she asked the country’s secretary for communities and local government to keep her updated on “ensure we are offering every support we can to residents & those working onsite.”

The move comes amid escalating concerns among residents of thousands of tower blocks around Britain. The Camden Council is the first to take such a dramatic step in light of June 14 fire at Grenfell Tower.

Council leader Georgia Gould says the borough took the unusual step after the London Fire Brigade and council experts had conducted a joint inspection of the properties.

“Camden Council is absolutely determined to ensure that our residents are safe and we have promised them that we will work with them, continue to act swiftly and be open and transparent,” Gould said in a statement.

The council is encouraging residents to stay with friends and family, but promised to provide temporary accommodations, if that weren’t possible. Repairs on the building are expected to be completed within three to four weeks.

“The Grenfell fire changes everything,” Gould said. “We need to do everything we can to keep residents safe.”

Camden is one of the councils in England which has learned that combustible cladding has been placed on buildings during renovation projects, though they had ordered non-flammable cladding.

Earlier Friday, police said they were considering filing manslaughter charges in the Grenfell incident.

In its most detailed briefing yet on the criminal investigation, the Metropolitan Police on Friday confirmed residents’ suspicions that the inferno at Grenfell was touched off by a refrigerator fire.

The department also said exterior cladding attached to the 24-story public housing project during a recent renovation failed safety tests conducted by investigators, and that police have seized documents from a number of organizations.

“We are looking at every criminal offense from manslaughter onwards,” Detective Superintendent Fiona McCormack told reporters. “We are looking at all health and safety and fire safety offenses, and we are reviewing every company at the moment involved in the building and refurbishment of Grenfell Tower.”

The government has ordered an immediate examination of the refrigerator model that started the blaze. McCormack said the Hotpoint model FF175BP refrigerator-freezer had not been subject to any product recalls before the fire.

Hotpoint said Friday that “words cannot express our sorrow at this terrible tragedy” and added it was working with authorities to examine the appliance.

The overnight fire rapidly engulfed Grenfell Tower, with flames shooting up the outside of the building, raising concerns that the cladding material attached to the concrete block didn’t comply with fire-safety rules.

Police are looking at all parts of the cladding system and its installation, McCormack said.

“Preliminary tests show the insulation samples collected from Grenfell Tower combusted soon after the test started,” she said. “The initial tests on equivalent aluminum composite tiles failed the safety tests.”

Authorities now acknowledge the risks posed by exterior cladding to thousands of people around the country who live in blocks like Grenfell Tower.

The government has called on all building owners, public and private, to submit samples of cladding material used on their buildings for testing. Samples from 14 buildings in London, Manchester and Plymouth have already been found to be combustible.

Fears about cladding are not limited to apartment buildings — at least one hotel chain is calling in experts to make certain it meets safety regulations. Premier Inn said Friday it had “concerns” about the material used on some of its buildings, though it is different from the type used at Grenfell Tower.

McCormack also repeated calls for anyone with information about the fire and all those in the tower at the time to come forward as police continue to comb through the devastated building to try to identify all the victims.

Police says 79 people are either dead or missing and presumed dead in the blaze, although that number may change.

To make sure everyone comes forward, London Mayor Sadiq Khan pledged to seek an amnesty for people who may have been living in the public housing block illegally. Prime Minister Theresa May also said the government won’t penalize any fire survivors in the country illegally.

“We want to identify all those who died as result of the fire at Grenfell Tower, and that is where I need the public’s help,” McCormack said. “I do not want there to be any hidden victims of this tragedy.”

Firefighters and emergency workers who battled the inferno have been leaving messages and tributes to the victims at a makeshift memorial near the charred apartment block.

Heartbreaking messages written on red London Fire Brigade T-shirts offer poignant tributes alongside flowers, toys and candles at the shrine. One tribute, from a firefighter in the Kensington and Chelsea borough read: “20th floor, we tried… we’re sorry.”

Another firefighter wrote “Our hearts go out to everyone touched by this tragedy. We did our best I promise.”

One shirt bearing the London Ambulance Service logo said: “We refuse to forget you.”

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A New Island Just Appeared Off the Coast of North Carolina
There’s always a new place to be discovered on this little blue marble of ours. A new island, just off the tip of Cape Point in Buxton, North Carolina, has practically crept up overnight. The island is approximately a mile long and three football fields wide. “It was just a little bump in April,” said…

There’s always a new place to be discovered on this little blue marble of ours.

A new island, just off the tip of Cape Point in Buxton, North Carolina, has practically crept up overnight. The island is approximately a mile long and three football fields wide.

“It was just a little bump in April,” said Janice Reagan to The Virginian-Pilot. Her son, Caleb, has named it “Shelly Island” for the scores of untouched seashells that are found nearby.

Dave Hallac, superintendent of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore, which oversees the area of Cape Point, warns that getting to the island is dangerous and that people should not attempt to walk or swim across the current to get there.

Since the area is a popular fishing spot, there can be many discarded fishing hooks on the sea bottom. Bill Smith, president of the North Carolina Beach Buggy Association, also told The Virginian-Pilot that the five-foot-long sharks and stingrays “as large as a hood of a truck” like to hunt in those waters.

Cape Hatteras point and the new sandbar island #capepoint

A post shared by 🅲🅷🅰🅳 (@chadonka) on

Still, some visitors have been rowing rafts across to the island.

According to Hallac, Cape Point is constantly changing. The sand moves and expands depending on currents and storms, which means the “Shelly Island” could easily disappear just as quickly as it came to be.

Or it can expand and even connect to Cape Point, making fishing even more of a draw in the area.

If you do happen to visit Cape Point, you’ll never know what to expect.

This article originally appeared on TravelandLeisure.com

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These Are the Most Colorful Places on Earth
See nature at its best

You can find color wherever you go, but there are some places that leave more vivid memories than others.

If you’re looking to douse yourself in the vibrancy of the world’s kaleidoscope, we’ve got some suggestions for you.

From an unexpected pink lake in the Dominican Republic to Iceland’s icy-blue Crystal Caves to India’s Holi festival, there are places all around the globe waiting to be explored.

Lavender fields, France

If the fragrant flowers don’t lure you in, the sea of purple will. Just imagining yourself completely surrounded in a delicious purple cloud is enough to bring your blood pressure down a few points.

Lady dress basket lavender field Provence perfume
Chad Ehlers—Getty Images

Lake Hillier, Australia

The pink color of this lake comes from its high salt content and the organisms living inside of it: algae and little dudes called halobacteria.

Lake Hillier.
Getty Images

Marble Caves, Chile

These beautiful caves change color depending on the color of the water. The gentle curves of the rock walls make it easier for sunlight to bounce around, reflecting the blues below.

Marble Caves, Lago Carrera, Patagonia, Chile
Witold Skrypczak—Getty Images

Tulip Fields of Holland

Every spring, rows upon rows of tulips bloom all around The Netherlands. Take a trip to Holland during March or April, and you’ll be treated to a once-in-a-lifetime scene.

Bulb Region with blooming tulips
Getty Images

Crystal Caves, Iceland

These caves weaving through Vatnajökull glacier are a huge destination for tourists looking for a new kind of vacation memory. These ice tunnels are constantly changing — which is why you need to visit them with an experienced guide — given that the glaciers are always shifting.

SvÂ’nafellsjkull glacier ice cave, Iceland
Johnathan Ampersand Esper—Getty Images

Rua Luis de Camōes, Águeda, Portugal

This tiny street in northwest Portugal has become the subject of many Instagram posts, thanks to the colorful umbrellas providing shade to passersby.

Umbrella Sky Project in Águeda / Portugal 2016
Luis Diaz Devesa—Getty Images

Great Barrier Reef, Australia

If you thought things could get colorful above ground, just wait until you see the underwater world that is the Great Barrier Reef. There’s just something about the colorful fishes living among the vibrant reef that makes it feel like you’re peeking into a different universe.

Colored Coral Reef
Daniela Dirscherl—Getty Images

Lake Natron, Tanzania

This “salt and soda” lake in northern Tanzania can actually be deadly to some animals. According to Live Science, the pH balance of the alkaline water is enough to burn anything that attempts to swim in it. Coincidently enough, it’s the same toxicity level that gives it a red, cracked appearance.

Soda and algae formation on surface of Lake Natron, Great Rift Valley, Tanzania
Gerry Ellis—Getty Images

Grand Prismatic Spring, Yellowstone National Park

This hot spring in Yellowstone National Park is the deepest in the park. It gets its name from the dark green water it’s filled with, giving it the appearance of a never-ending tunnel into the Earth.

Grand Prismatic Spring, Midway Geyser, Yellowstone
Ignacio Palacios—Getty Images

Holi Festival, India

People around the world get together to celebrate the Hindu holiday of Holi, or “The Festival of Colors,” which marks the beginning of spring. One of the most fun activities is tossing colored powered onto everyone in sight, resulting in a human color wheel.

Holi, The Festival of Colors, India
Poras Chaudhary—Getty Images

Rue Targui, Chefchouen, Morocco

While the medinas of Morocco are colorful on their own, nothing beats the all-blue city of Chefchouen. Every street and building here is painted in a various shade of blue. The city was previously closed off to foreigners for 500 years, but now welcomes travelers in search of a blue paradise with open arms.

MOROCCO-TOURISM-DAILY LIFE
Emily Irving-Swift—AFP/Getty Images

The Wave, Coyote Buttes, Arizona

This sandstone formation is brushed in hues of brick red and golden yellow, changing colors as quickly as the weather patterns. Depending on when you visit — sunrise, sunset, the dead of night —you’ll get an entirely different palette.

The Wave
Getty Images

Northern Lights of Tromsø, Norway

Located in the Arctic Circle, the Tromsø area is home to some of the best Northern Lights shows in the world. If you’re lucky, you’ll even catch a night when the pink lights emerge from the sky.

Aurora Borealis Northern Lights, Tromso, Norway
Tim Graham—Getty Images

Rio Tinto, Spain

This red river in Spain gets its tint from thousands of year of mining in the area. Miners search for copper, gold, and silver, but the dissolved iron from the river’s rocks is the reason it’s so red.

Blood red mineral laden water in the Rio Tinto river in the Minas de Riotinto mining area, Huelva province
Getty Images

Cinque Terre, Italy

These pastel buildings meet the sea in a stunning cliffside scene. The best views are when the coastline is lit up at night illuminating the soft colors against the deepening blue of the sky.

Manarola
Guillaume Chanson—Getty Images

Tokyo, Japan

Visit Tokyo at night, and its neon signs will have you looking in every single direction, ten times over. If you thought Times Square was a nighttime sight to see, just wait until you’re lost deep into one of Tokyo’s neighborhood with nothing but the shop and restaurant signs surrounding you.

Center street shibuya
David Gee—Getty Images

Moscow, Russia

The Naryshkin baroque style of architecture you’ll find in Moscow is unlike any other. Pair the turrets and rounded design details with the colorful paint palettes and you’ve got yourself a scene straight from a storybook.

Ayhan Altun—Getty Images

Salt Flats, San Francisco Bay

This grid of colorful salt ponds is best seen from the sky. These various ponds have been turned different colors because of the micro-algae and microorganisms living in each one.

SALT FLATS, SAN FRANCISCO BAY, CALIFORNIA
Michael Melford—Getty Images

Bo-Kaap, Cape Town, Africa

These neon-colored houses in Cape Town are recognized around the world. This neighborhood is an Instagram Story waiting to happen.

Houses in Bo Kaap, Cape Town.
Mark Williamson—Getty Images

Death Valley During a Super Bloom

It doesn’t happen often, but when Death Valley gets enough rain during the winter months, spring brings with it an explosion of brilliant blooms just waiting to be photographed.

Super Bloom in Death Valley
Trina Dopp Photography—Getty Images

Copenhagen, Denmark

The colorful area of Nyhavn has been around since the 17th century, and is home to a row of vibrant houses, restaurants, and bars. The waterfront location only adds to its charm.

Nyhavn, Copenhagen, Denmark
Getty Images

Wisteria Tunnel, Japan

This tunnel of cascading wisteria flowers is a literal dream come true. If you’ve ever wanted to actually live inside a watercolor, head to the Kawachi Fuji Gardens.

Wisteria Tunnel
Getty Images

This article originally appeared on TravelandLeisure.com

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How the Trump Administration Is Reversing Progress on HIV Treatment
As an HIV researcher and clinician, I have seen firsthand the virus’s disproportionate devastation of sexual minorities, the poor and many people of color. Nevertheless, steady research progress during recent years has allowed us to envision and work toward the end of the epidemic. Until recently, our efforts were effectively guided by the first-ever National…

As an HIV researcher and clinician, I have seen firsthand the virus’s disproportionate devastation of sexual minorities, the poor and many people of color. Nevertheless, steady research progress during recent years has allowed us to envision and work toward the end of the epidemic. Until recently, our efforts were effectively guided by the first-ever National HIV/AIDS Strategy, released seven years ago next month.

But the gains we made can easily be lost, and they are in grave danger. The Trump Administration and some Congressional leaders have chosen to abdicate government’s responsibility for the poor and disadvantaged and devalue the health of the American public. They have proposed stripping Medicaid from millions of low-income people, leaving them without access to healthcare or other essential services. They want to bar federal funding for Planned Parenthood, which provides women with HIV and STD prevention services. And they’ve hampered efforts to develop cures and improve prevention and treatment by proposing to cut funds for research.

MORE: 6 Resigned from Trump’s HIV/AIDS Advisory Board. Here’s Why One Doctor Stayed

Even actions that may not seem directly related to health would have a large impact, like slashing funding for federal housing programs, education, food assistance and other social welfare programs, and reinstating previously failed policies that harm public health, like incarcerating drug users instead of treating them and promoting abstinence-only sex education programs. Since January, each new policy announcement has threatened our fragile success in beating the HIV epidemic.

My hope is that we can make the nation great for everyone rather than returning to the days when it was great for only a few. If the Administration and the Congress do not reverse the direction we are headed, America’s prognosis is grim.

The HIV and public health communities have our work cut out for us. Here’s how to get started:

Acknowledge progress

The annual number of new HIV infections in the U.S. fell by 18% from 2008 to 2014, saving treatment costs of $14.9 billion. The percentage of people with an HIV diagnosis who are effectively treated increased to 55%. The uninsured rate among people with HIV dropped by 6% in states that expanded Medicaid, and the percentage of people with HIV who were effectively treated in these states increased significantly after just one year.

Follow the science

Unprecedented research advances over the last three decades have driven our progress, resulting in more effective and less toxic treatment. There is now overwhelming evidence that effective treatment keeps people with HIV healthy and reduces their risk of transmitting the virus to near zero. On the prevention front, considerable evidence supports the effectiveness of interventions, such as syringe exchange and comprehensive sexual education, and new tools, such as Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis, known as PrEP.

Reverse course

The Trump Administration and members of Congress can still make a course correction and prevent national public health crises on a number of fronts, including HIV, opioid addiction and hepatitis C. Rather than leaving millions of Americans without health care coverage—including many who count on the Medicaid program—policymakers should work with healthcare providers, patient advocates and others to reduce healthcare costs and build on, rather than reverse, the gains of the last few years. They should prioritize the health, wellbeing and education of the most vulnerable when making federal funding decisions and abandon their resurrection of policies that have failed in the past and sabotage public health.

MORE: 4 Ways the Senate Health Care Bill Would Hurt Women

Act now

We cannot turn back; 45% of people diagnosed with HIV are still not effectively treated for it. More than 200 U.S. counties are at risk for serious HIV outbreaks linked to injection drug use. Research indicates that as many as one in two black gay men could be diagnosed with HIV in their lifetime. We need strong political leadership at all levels and activism to educate those in power about what’s at stake.

Adimora is professor of medicine and epidemiology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a member of the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS (PACHA). The views expressed in this commentary are her own and do not necessarily represent those of PACHA.

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5 Songs You Need to Listen to This Week
This week, DJ Khaled finally released his feature-stacked album Grateful, with collaborators like Alicia Keys and Nicki Minaj as highlights of the pack. Former America’s Got Talent breakout star and ukulele master Grace VanderWaal debuts a summery, upbeat new single. One of the top songs from Broadway hit Dear Evan Hansen gets an Owl City…

This week, DJ Khaled finally released his feature-stacked album Grateful, with collaborators like Alicia Keys and Nicki Minaj as highlights of the pack. Former America’s Got Talent breakout star and ukulele master Grace VanderWaal debuts a summery, upbeat new single. One of the top songs from Broadway hit Dear Evan Hansen gets an Owl City makeover, with radio-ready results. Indie-pop’s Fitz and the Tantrums find a pleasantly funky groove on an optimistic breakout song. And rising New York rapper Ro Ransom hits just the right notes on a slinky new single.

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