Reuters: Technology News
last updated: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 10:15:19 GMT

Google to build 600 million euro data center in the Netherlands
AMSTERDAM (Reuters) - Google will build a 600 million euro ($773.58 million) data center in the northern Netherlands, the company said on Tuesday.

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BBC News - Technology
last updated: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 08:05:47 GMT

eBay criticised as hacks continue
Leading security researchers call on eBay to take immediate action over dangerous listings - as more security problems arise.

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PC World - News RSS feed
last updated: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 11:42:31 +1000

EU tells Google to make more concessions or face charges in antitrust dispute
Google has to improve its settlement terms in an antitrust investigation over its search practices or face charges, following opposition from some quarters to the deal, the European Commission's competition chief Joaquin Almunia said Tuesday.

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Tech News Headlines - Yahoo News
last updated: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 08:05:19 -0400

Microsoft Xbox One set to launch in China on September 29

Xie, general manager of management and operations of Microsoft in China, speaks during the presentation of the Xbox One by Microsoft as part of ChinaJoy 2014 in ShanghaiBy Paul Carsten BEIJING (Reuters) - Microsoft Corp has set Sept. 29 as the new launch date for its Xbox One game console in China, the U.S. software giant said on Tuesday, in the first launch since a 14-year ban on sales of foreign games consoles was lifted this year. The world's biggest software company gave no reason for the delay in the launch which was originally scheduled for Sept. 23. The delay is the latest in a series of setbacks for Microsoft in China, where it is under investigation for suspected anti-trust violations related to the Windows operating system and Microsoft Office. ...


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Cuddles threaten hook-up culture
SICK and tired of the hook-up culture on Tinder and Grindr? There’s a new location-based social-meeting application on the market just for cuddles.

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CNET News.com
last updated: Fri, 21 Mar 2014 18:41:00 PDT

Mom tries to Facebook-shame daughter, gets pizza on face
A mother makes her daughter pose for a picture to prove that it will travel far and wide on the Web. She ends up getting prank calls, pizza deliveries, and a lesson for herself.

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NSA's reported Huawei hack gives glimpse of agency's role in 'cyber Cold War'
The latest report based on leaks by Edward Snowden has it that the NSA hacked into the servers of a Chinese router company that had itself been accused by the US of potentially aiding government espionage.

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Twitter battle in Turkey heats up, spreads to YouTube -- reports
The fight over a Twitter ban in the country intensifies, as the government reportedly blocks a workaround, the White House weighs in, and Google refuses to yank YouTube vids critical of the prime minister.

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Apple rumor claims all-new, 12-inch MacBook Air
The MacBook is getting a makeover sooner rather than later -- if chatter from China is accurate.

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Businesses of the future...with Samsung devices, of course (pictures)
The Korean electronics giant operates a showroom -- called the Executive Briefing Center -- at its North American headquarters in New Jersey to show potential business customers what Samsung technology they can use to change their operations.

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2048 starts easy; gets hard. Here's how to make it easy again
The Threes-like puzzle game sucks you in by making it seem easy to hit the magic number. Turns out, though, that it actually is easy -- if you understand the game's logic.

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Samsung shows business customers how to be high tech
The Korean electronics giant operates a showroom in New Jersey to demonstrate technology it has for hotels, financial firms, retailers, and other businesses.

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Automating your 2048 game
2048 may be deceptively difficult in its later stages, but the early portion of the game can be played mindlessly by mashing the left and up arrow keys and building into a corner.

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Google speeds WebP image format, brings animation support to Chrome
Other browser makers are unmoved by file-size advantages of the image format, but Google is pressing ahead. And it's saving terabytes of network usage a day on its own sites.

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Obama talks spying with Facebook's Zuckerberg, Google's Schmidt
Zuckerberg and Obama "had an honest talk about government intrusion on the Internet," says Facebook -- just days after the CEO posted an indignant statement on his Facebook page.

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Apple considering a Spotify rival and iTunes Android app
The company is in talks to launch an on-demand streaming music service in order to battle US declines in iTunes downloads, according to Billboard.

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Get your body into VR games
Gesture-control armband Myo by Thalmic Labs has found a way for gamers to go from hands on to hands in. When paired with virtual-reality headset Oculus Rift, gamers can see and use their hands in games. CNET got a demo of the combo in action.

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Behind the sounds of Infamous: Second Son
Creating a video game hero with superpowers like smoke and neon means figuring out what they should sound like. Sony took CNET behind the scenes to show us how it created the sound effects for new PS4 game Infamous: Second Son.

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Dolby to put Atmos surround sound on tablets, smartphones
The immersive audio that makes moviegoers feel like they're inside the film rather than just watching it will be available for Dolby partners to incorporate on mobile by the end of the year, Dolby says.

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Runway safety improvements under way at SFO (pictures)
Two of four runways will close as part of federally mandated improvements. CNET takes a look at the technology and gets a tour of SFO's runways.

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San Francisco Airport uses tech to meet runway safety standards
In order to meet a federal directive, the airport will close two runways this summer to install a special concrete material that will bring runaway aircraft quickly to a stop.

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Microsoft revises privacy policy in wake of Hotmail search case
Blowback in handling of corporate espionage case forces Microsoft to promise stronger policies protecting privacy of Hotmail account holders.

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Phil Spencer on Xbox One 'always-on' debacle: 'We could have been more clear'
On the final day of the Game Developers Conference, the head of Microsoft Studios opens up about the Xbox One's tumultuous road to launch and the company's indie game relationship.

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Microsoft: Here's $100 if you drop Windows XP
Hey XP users, time to move on -- Microsoft is saying in no uncertain terms by offering $100 off a new PC.

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The Web out-Picassos itself: Welcome, sticky tape selfies
In the latest and perhaps most tastelessly sweet Internet meme, people are wrapping their faces in sticky tape and snapping the results. Perfect for your 3-year-old this weekend.

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BuzzFeed - Geeky
last updated: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 11:04:02 -0400

"Lost" Changed My Life In More Ways Than I Can Count

“Guys, where are we?”

ABC

I saw the pilot episode of Lost a few months before it premiered on ABC exactly 10 years ago today — on Sept. 22, 2004.

I was working in television development at the time, and a box of pilots — they may have even been on VHS tapes — had just arrived from a talent agency. My co-workers and I gathered in a tiny, cramped office to sort through the 30–40 screeners, most with titles and premises now forgotten, to find our copy of Lost. Damon Lindelof was an unknown name to us then, but we were addicted to Alias, the trippy espionage drama from Lost co-creator J.J. Abrams, who had also won our hearts with the wistful Felicity.

Twitter and social media as we now know them did not yet exist and, while we had followed the development of the super-expensive pilot in the Hollywood trades (when people still read printed trade publications), we knew nothing of the plot beyond the seemingly simple strangers-survive-a-plane-crash premise. We had no idea just what was in store for us as we dimmed the lights and hit "play."

The 90-minute pilot was full of scares, surprises, and even a few laughs (that wonky polar bear!), and, most importantly, it introduced mysteries that had us immediately talking and questioning. And it's the latter that became a trademark effect of the show, one that would be closely associated with Lost until its finale in 2010 and well beyond, and one that was instrumental in helping to cement the show's massive success. (Almost 20 million people tuned in to the pilot when it aired.) What was this island? What was a crazed polar bear doing in the jungle? What was going to happen to these survivors and, to borrow the words of rocker Charlie (Dominic Monaghan), "Where are we?"


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TIME
last updated:

What We Know About the Latest Nude Celebrity Photo Hack
And what we don't

More explicit photos were posted on the website 4chan Saturday, this time purportedly showing Kim Kardashian, Vanessa Hudgens, Mary-Kate Olsen, Hayden Panettiere, Kaley Cuoco, Hope Solo and an underage Disney star, among other female celebrities.

Previously unseen photos purportedly showing Jennifer Lawrence, who became the face of the last major celebrity photo hack, were posted, too. The photos quickly spread from 4chan to Reddit, following the same pattern as the previous hack, which leaked private photos of Lawrence, Kate Upton, Ariana Grande and almost 100 other female celebrities.

Here’s what we do and don’t know about the latest nude celebrity photo hack:

Are the photos real?

At least two of the hack’s victims have confirmed their leaked photos are, in fact, real.

Actress Gabrielle Union told TMZ on Saturday that her photos were intended for only her husband’s eyes, and slammed the hackers’ insensitivity. “It has come to our attention that our private moments, that were shared and deleted solely between my husband and myself, have been leaked by some vultures,” Union said.

On Sunday, Actress Meagan Good released a statement on Instagram, saying “I’m definitely in shock… Saddened for everyone who is experiencing this… But I ‘choose’ not to give the persons responsible my power.. At the end of the day—We all know these pictures were for my husband.”

In the last celebrity hack, many victims confirmed that the photos were indeed authentic. Cuoco, whose photos were also released in the previous hack, said Thursday on Jimmey Kimmel Live! that she was disturbed to realize the photos were real, but ended up making a “joke about it,” because “you have to make fun of yourself.” Other reactions were less lighthearted: Lawrence’s rep called it a “flagrant violation of privacy.”

What about the other celebrities?

Most have not released statements, or have declined to speak. A rep for Kardashian has declined to comment about the leaked photos to multiple publications. There’s also no word from Panettiere, Olsen, Solo or Hudgens.

But many are wondering about Hudgens, and what approach she’ll take now that she’s not the young Disney starlet of the High School Musical franchise. In 2007, after being shamed for a leaked nude photo, the 18-year-old actress apologized to fans, while Disney followed up and told People that “We hope she’s learned a valuable lesson.”

How did it happen?

No one knows yet, but experts told TIME they believe it’s similar to the last celebrity photo leak, when Apple confirmed that it was a “very targeted attack on user names, passwords and security questions,” and a not system-wide breach of iCloud or Find my iPhone, as was first widely believed. (TIME has reached out to Apple for comment regarding the most recent hack.)

Bob Stasio, Vice President of Threat Intelligence at CyberIQ Services, said the most probable cause is that hackers obtained access to photos by answering security questions to recover or reset passwords—a common tactic and the one apparently used last time. Last year, Michelle Obama’s and other celebrities’ financial records were accessed by hackers who knew enough personal identifying information to impersonate them, according to CNBC.

“The problem with celebrities is that a lot of their information is publicly available,” Stasio said.

Once the passwords have been reset, the hackers can access the celebrities’ e-mail accounts to obtain the passwords to enter iCloud. Hackers will have previously gained access to the stars’ computer servers, thus their e-mails, either physically or remotely through backdoors planted in their systems, Stasio said. These backdoors may have been planted through targeted emails that tempt the users to click on a link or download an attachment.

“That’s really how hacking works,” Stasio said. “It’s all very iterative. You get to one spot, and you have to get to the next spot.”

Can the hackers be found?

They haven’t been found yet, and security experts believe it will be difficult, but not impossible, to track down the hackers. If iCloud accounts were accessed, then Apple can use a record of logins to determine the IP address, Stasio said. But hackers would likely hide their IP address by routing through a different one in another country, which complicates the process. Another method would be to track who had originally posted the pictures on 4chan.

In fact, experts say photo-leaking culprits are often caught, and the fact that both Apple and law enforcement are already involved make the investigation even more likely to turn up results. In 2011, for example, a hacker used the “forgot my password” function to access and leak nude photos and other personal information of Scarlett Johansson, Mila Kunis and Christina Aguilera. An FBI investigation resulted months later in a Florida man being sentenced to 10 years in federal prison, according to CNN.

“The success rate is very high. People doing this are very foolish, thinking they’re going to get away with it,” said Phil Lieberman, President of Lieberman Software Corporation. “For a period of time, they’re the hero. Once they’re caught, they’ll become the zero.”

So why haven’t we found the hackers yet?

In short, it takes time.

“If someone’s life is in danger, law enforcement moves very quickly,” Lieberman said. “But pictures of celebrities don’t rise to the level of kidnapping, murders or serious violent crimes. They’re seen more as economic crimes or invasions of privacy, which are serious, but go on a little slower track.”

Moreover, the fact that Apple’s weak iCloud security was patched only recently means that several intruders may have been in the system for quite a while, experts said, which would add additional layers to the investigation.

Will it happen again?

Experts say yes: This is the second major celebrity photo hack in one month, and it’s part of a rising trend. When Target was hacked last year, Stasio said, a group of hackers sent e-mails to other companies saying they’d detected a similar vulnerability, offering help through a clickable link, which, if opened, would’ve infected the company’s system.

“Not only have the trends of the actual hacks spread, but people use the awareness of the hack itself to try to use it as an infection,” Stasio said.

And there’s likely more photos that have been accessed but not yet shared. Lieberman said that for hackings in the commercial world, the average time the hacker or hackers have spent in the system is 200 days. This suggests the intruders could’ve had months to amass a large collection of explicit photos.

“This may not even be different than the first one,” Lieberman said. “This may in fact be the same group of people with the same set of data, just simply taking another bite of the apple.”

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Twitter / liamalexander
last updated: Mon, 08 Oct 2012 07:22:42 +0000

liamalexander: My daily stats: 12 new followers, 9 new unfollowers via http://t.co/hROlspGI
liamalexander: My daily stats: 12 new followers, 9 new unfollowers via http://t.co/hROlspGI

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Twitter / Favorites from liamalexander
last updated: Mon, 25 Apr 2011 22:44:57 +0000

alanjonesUK: RT @PopSci: Scientists finally have some answers about the mysterious "dark matter" in the human genome: http://t.co/Gm4Fh0B6
alanjonesUK: RT @PopSci: Scientists finally have some answers about the mysterious "dark matter" in the human genome: http://t.co/Gm4Fh0B6

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Ask the Guru
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Captain marketing phone number - We are a SEO, SEM, and online advertising firm based in Los Angeles. Our experts specialize in search engine optimization, Intern

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Stumble
last updated: Fri, 25 Feb 2011 22:09:15 +0000
The Next Web
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Google is spending $770 million on a new data centre in the Netherlands

Google has announced plans to build a new data centre in Europe, this time in Eemshaven, a seaport in the Netherlands. The internet giant says it has put aside €600 million ($772 million) to build the new data centre, and will be its fourth location in Europe after Finland, Belgium and Ireland. Google currently has more than 10 data centres across the Americas, Europe and Asia. Indeed, its first two Asian data centres opened just last year, in Taiwan and Singapore. Google says the new facility will create more than 1,000 jobs, with a view towards starting “initial opertions” in...

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