Reuters: Technology News
last updated: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 21:27:34 GMT

Twitter grants $10 million to MIT for social data analysis, new tools
SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Twitter Inc on Wednesday gave $10 million to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for research that would explore how people use and achieve shared goals using social networks.






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BBC News - Technology
last updated: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 11:21:43 GMT

Airlines told to replace cockpit kit
The US air safety regulator has ordered airlines to replace cockpit displays in more than 1,300 planes because of fears that wi-fi signals can make them go blank.

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PC World - News RSS feed
last updated: Thu, 02 Oct 2014 04:21:25 +1000

Verizon won't throttle unlimited LTE users after all
Verizon Wireless won't go ahead with a widely criticized plan to slow down the connections of heavy data users with unlimited LTE plans.

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Tech News Headlines - Yahoo News
last updated: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 17:59:03 -0400

Philips Electronics loses $467 million patent verdict to Masimo

The logo of Philips is seen at the company's entrance in Brussels(Reuters) - A federal jury on Wednesday said Philips Electronics NA should pay $466.8 million to Masimo Corp for having infringed two patents for technology used to help measure blood oxygen and track pulse rates. Shares of Masimo closed 12.9 percent higher, rising $2.74 to $24.02 on the Nasdaq. Jurors in Wilmington, Delaware needed less than a day of deliberations before ruling in favor of Irvine, California-based Masimo, following a two-week trial. ...


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Hugging chair ‘relieves loneliness’
A JAPANESE company has come up with a chair that’s always ready to give a comforting cuddle.

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CNET News.com
last updated: Fri, 21 Mar 2014 18:41:00 PDT

Mom tries to Facebook-shame daughter, gets pizza on face
A mother makes her daughter pose for a picture to prove that it will travel far and wide on the Web. She ends up getting prank calls, pizza deliveries, and a lesson for herself.

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NSA's reported Huawei hack gives glimpse of agency's role in 'cyber Cold War'
The latest report based on leaks by Edward Snowden has it that the NSA hacked into the servers of a Chinese router company that had itself been accused by the US of potentially aiding government espionage.

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Twitter battle in Turkey heats up, spreads to YouTube -- reports
The fight over a Twitter ban in the country intensifies, as the government reportedly blocks a workaround, the White House weighs in, and Google refuses to yank YouTube vids critical of the prime minister.

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Apple rumor claims all-new, 12-inch MacBook Air
The MacBook is getting a makeover sooner rather than later -- if chatter from China is accurate.

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Businesses of the future...with Samsung devices, of course (pictures)
The Korean electronics giant operates a showroom -- called the Executive Briefing Center -- at its North American headquarters in New Jersey to show potential business customers what Samsung technology they can use to change their operations.

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2048 starts easy; gets hard. Here's how to make it easy again
The Threes-like puzzle game sucks you in by making it seem easy to hit the magic number. Turns out, though, that it actually is easy -- if you understand the game's logic.

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Samsung shows business customers how to be high tech
The Korean electronics giant operates a showroom in New Jersey to demonstrate technology it has for hotels, financial firms, retailers, and other businesses.

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Automating your 2048 game
2048 may be deceptively difficult in its later stages, but the early portion of the game can be played mindlessly by mashing the left and up arrow keys and building into a corner.

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Google speeds WebP image format, brings animation support to Chrome
Other browser makers are unmoved by file-size advantages of the image format, but Google is pressing ahead. And it's saving terabytes of network usage a day on its own sites.

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Obama talks spying with Facebook's Zuckerberg, Google's Schmidt
Zuckerberg and Obama "had an honest talk about government intrusion on the Internet," says Facebook -- just days after the CEO posted an indignant statement on his Facebook page.

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Apple considering a Spotify rival and iTunes Android app
The company is in talks to launch an on-demand streaming music service in order to battle US declines in iTunes downloads, according to Billboard.

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Get your body into VR games
Gesture-control armband Myo by Thalmic Labs has found a way for gamers to go from hands on to hands in. When paired with virtual-reality headset Oculus Rift, gamers can see and use their hands in games. CNET got a demo of the combo in action.

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Behind the sounds of Infamous: Second Son
Creating a video game hero with superpowers like smoke and neon means figuring out what they should sound like. Sony took CNET behind the scenes to show us how it created the sound effects for new PS4 game Infamous: Second Son.

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Dolby to put Atmos surround sound on tablets, smartphones
The immersive audio that makes moviegoers feel like they're inside the film rather than just watching it will be available for Dolby partners to incorporate on mobile by the end of the year, Dolby says.

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Runway safety improvements under way at SFO (pictures)
Two of four runways will close as part of federally mandated improvements. CNET takes a look at the technology and gets a tour of SFO's runways.

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San Francisco Airport uses tech to meet runway safety standards
In order to meet a federal directive, the airport will close two runways this summer to install a special concrete material that will bring runaway aircraft quickly to a stop.

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Microsoft revises privacy policy in wake of Hotmail search case
Blowback in handling of corporate espionage case forces Microsoft to promise stronger policies protecting privacy of Hotmail account holders.

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Phil Spencer on Xbox One 'always-on' debacle: 'We could have been more clear'
On the final day of the Game Developers Conference, the head of Microsoft Studios opens up about the Xbox One's tumultuous road to launch and the company's indie game relationship.

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Microsoft: Here's $100 if you drop Windows XP
Hey XP users, time to move on -- Microsoft is saying in no uncertain terms by offering $100 off a new PC.

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The Web out-Picassos itself: Welcome, sticky tape selfies
In the latest and perhaps most tastelessly sweet Internet meme, people are wrapping their faces in sticky tape and snapping the results. Perfect for your 3-year-old this weekend.

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BuzzFeed - Geeky
last updated: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 12:40:56 -0400

These Cereals Based On Comic Book Characters Are Awesome

They’re simply Marvelous.

Artists Bamboota and Elliot Fernandez reimagined some of Marvel's finest characters as delicious cereals.

Artists Bamboota and Elliot Fernandez reimagined some of Marvel's finest characters as delicious cereals.

Bamboota / Elliot Fernandez

Loki Charms are, appropriately, mischievously delicious.

Loki Charms are, appropriately, mischievously delicious.

Bamboota / Elliot Fernandez

And Thorrios offer a free mini-Mjölnir!

And Thorrios offer a free mini-Mjölnir!

Bamboota / Elliot Fernandez

A box of Deadloops also comes with some free, cannon-appropriate swag.

A box of Deadloops also comes with some free, cannon-appropriate swag.

Bamboota / Elliot Fernandez


View Entire List ›

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TIME
last updated:

This Small Cable Operator May Help Unravel the Pay TV Industry
Suddenlink has dropped Viacom channels from its lineup, perhaps permanently. That's a cardinal sin in the world of pay-TV.

A cable company and a TV network have been in a dispute over how much the network’s content is really worth. This may sound like a familiar tale, but there’s an unusual ending this time. Suddenlink, a St. Louis-based operator with more than 1.1 million subscribers, dropped Viacom’s collection of well-known TV channels from its lineup Wednesday, and they’re probably not coming back anytime soon.

Negotiations over carriage fees, the amount that pay-TV operators pay network owners to carry their channels, often turn into very public spats. Time Warner Cable kicked CBS-owned networks off its channel lineup for a month in 2013, and The Weather Channel went so far as to lobby Congress to force DirecTV to keep the channel on its airwaves earlier this year. In both instances, the two sides eventually reached a truce.

That doesn’t appear to be in the cards this time. Because Suddenlink couldn’t come to an agreement with Viacom on appropriate carriage fees, the cable company has replaced mainstays on the channel dial like MTV and Comedy Central with new additions such as FXX and the Hallmark Channel. Suddenlink thinks its customers won’t miss Viacom’s offerings much. “It’s unfortunate we could not reach agreement,” spokesman Pete Abel said in an email. “But we have moved on and are excited about the new channels we’re adding and our customers have told us they would like to have.”

In the traditional pay-TV model, a cable company dumping Viacom’s channels could be viewed as a cardinal sin. Historically, network owners and cable operators have worked in lockstep to keep their highly lucrative system intact. Operators agree to buy up channels from media conglomerates like Viacom in unwieldy bundles, which means a 26-year-old bachelor is stuck paying for Nickelodeon. Network owners in turn make sure that having a pricey cable subscription is pretty much the only legal way for viewers to see TV shows as they’re airing. Content creators also charge new entrants to the pay-TV space a higher carriage fee for their channels, according to Erik Brannon, a TV industry analyst at IHS Screen Digest. Intel had been planning a pay-TV service that would deliver live television content over the Internet, but the costs of acquiring programming were prohibitively high.

Suddenlink tried to upend this long-standing formula by asking Viacom to sell just a few of the channels that are popular with its customers, like TV Land and Comedy Central. Suddenlink says that Viacom responded by increasing its price demands even more. On a website about the dispute, Viacom says that Suddenlink abruptly stopped negotiating and reneged on a last-minute proposal that met the cable operator’s demands. “We remain committed to reaching a deal so that our viewers will be able to watch their favorite shows,” Viacom wrote on the site. Viacom did not respond to an email from TIME seeking further comment.

The Suddenlink decision could inspire other small and mid-size operators, already being squeezed by subscriber declines, refuse carriage fee increases from media giants. Sixty smaller cable companies, including one with half a million subscribers, lost Viacom’s channels in the spring and haven’t yet restored them. “Mid-tier operators and small operators are going to have to look at the profitability of carrying networks vs. their viewership,” Brannon says. “When you’re in the position of Suddenlink . . . you absolutely do not have the buying power that Comcast or DirecTV have.”

At the same time, channel owners are becoming more receptive to the Internet-based TV services of which they were once wary. Viacom has agreed to offer 22 of its channels on a new, Internet-based TV service that Sony is launching later this year, the first such deal the media giant has made public. The revenue generated from that deal, which Brannon says probably included a guarantee by Sony of a minimum number of subscribers, might make Viacom less concerned about the activities of the smaller traditional cable companies.

Whether these strategic shifts will benefit consumers, networks or cable operators remains to be seen. Suddenlink is hoping that losing Viacom won’t hurt its subscriber numbers, but Cable One, the largest of the sixty cable companies to dump Viacom in the spring, doubled its subscriber loss the quarter it removed Viacom’s channels. And while Internet-based pay-TV services like Sony’s promise an improved user experience, no one has yet broached the topic of offering channels “a la carte” and allowing customers to pick exactly what content they’d like to buy.

Still, the once-sacred marriage between cable operators and network owners is under obvious strain. That leaves room for new entrants to claim a piece of the market—hopefully for many, with business models that are more in line with customer preferences. “Carriage fee negotiations are going to become increasingly contentious,” warns Brannon. “Not only at Viacom but other channel groups.”

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Twitter / liamalexander
last updated: Mon, 08 Oct 2012 07:22:42 +0000

liamalexander: My daily stats: 12 new followers, 9 new unfollowers via http://t.co/hROlspGI
liamalexander: My daily stats: 12 new followers, 9 new unfollowers via http://t.co/hROlspGI

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Twitter / Favorites from liamalexander
last updated: Mon, 25 Apr 2011 22:44:57 +0000

alanjonesUK: RT @PopSci: Scientists finally have some answers about the mysterious "dark matter" in the human genome: http://t.co/Gm4Fh0B6
alanjonesUK: RT @PopSci: Scientists finally have some answers about the mysterious "dark matter" in the human genome: http://t.co/Gm4Fh0B6

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Ask the Guru
last updated:

Captain marketing phone number - We are a SEO, SEM, and online advertising firm based in Los Angeles. Our experts specialize in search engine optimization, Intern

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Stumble
last updated: Fri, 25 Feb 2011 22:09:15 +0000
The Next Web
last updated:

Google to remove thumbnail and news snippets of German newspapers from search results

Most publications are excited when they see their articles at the top of Google search results. Germany’s VG Media is not one of those publications. As a result of pressure from publishers, Computer World reports that Google is removing news snippets and image thumbnails from search results of German news sites like bild.de, hoerzu.de and others under the VG Media umbrella. VG Media insists that Google should pay publishers a portion of the ad revenue that Google collects when it republishes portions of a news article. In response Google will only post an article headline and link. ➤ News on News with...

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