Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Sun, 20 Aug 2017 02:11:55 -0400

Who marched in Boston? Faces and voices from the rally and counterprotest

Who marched in Boston? Faces and voices from the rally and counterprotestYahoo News went into the crowd in Boston Saturday and talked to mostly right-wing marchers for “free speech” and to mostly progressive counterprotesters.


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15 Most Stressful Jobs in the World

Everyone has a bad day at work now and then. But if you have one of these 15 Most Stressful Jobs in the World, even one bad day can get you or someone else killed. From EMT to Coal Miner to Ice Road Trucker, these are the jobs that will keep you up at nights!


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Herald Sun | Breaking News
last updated: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 22:01:00 GMT

Canal jumper released on bail
AN 18-year-old man who jumped into a canal at Surfers Paradise to avoid being arrested by police on Wednesday night has been granted bail.

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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Sat, 19 Aug 2017 19:11:59 -0400

Who marched in Boston? Faces and voices from the rally and counterprotest

Who marched in Boston? Faces and voices from the rally and counterprotestYahoo News went into the crowd in Boston Saturday and talked to mostly right-wing marchers for “free speech” and to mostly progressive counterprotesters.


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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Sat, 19 Aug 2017 20:54:18 -0400

Who marched in Boston? Faces and voices from the rally and counterprotest

Who marched in Boston? Faces and voices from the rally and counterprotestYahoo News went into the crowd in Boston Saturday and talked to mostly right-wing marchers for “free speech” and to mostly progressive counterprotesters.


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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Sun, 20 Aug 2017 14:44:58 -0400

Who marched in Boston? Faces and voices from the rally and counterprotest

Who marched in Boston? Faces and voices from the rally and counterprotestYahoo News went into the crowd in Boston Saturday and talked to mostly right-wing marchers for “free speech” and to mostly progressive counterprotesters.


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Watts: When Leaders are Silent, They Are Agreeing With KKK

Watts: When Leaders are Silent, They Are Agreeing With KKKFormer Congressman J.C. Watts (R-Okla) tells Chuck Todd that now "is not a time for us to be afraid to be tweeted" by the president.


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An Oregon Wildfire is Blazing in the Eclipse's Path of Totality

An Oregon Wildfire is Blazing in the Eclipse's Path of TotalityAbout 600 residents in the area were already evacuated


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6 Officers Shot in Florida and Pennsylvania, 2 Killed and 4 Wounded

6 Officers Shot in Florida and Pennsylvania, 2 Killed and 4 WoundedThree police departments are reeling from a violent night that has left two officers dead.


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Couple Who Engaged In Sexual Act Aboard Southwest Airlines Flight Questioned

Couple Who Engaged In Sexual Act Aboard Southwest Airlines Flight QuestionedThe airline said the incident occurred on a flight from Atlanta to Las Vegas and apologized to other passengers aboard the flight.


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Oxford University employee and US academic brought to Chicago to face murder charges

Oxford University employee and US academic brought to Chicago to face murder chargesTwo employees of elite universities charged in the fatal stabbing of a 26-year-old hair stylist were returned to Chicago early Saturday to face charges of first-degree murder in the brutal killing. Chicago police escorted fired Northwestern University professor Wyndham Lathem, 43, and Oxford University financial officer Andrew Warren, 56, from Northern California, where they surrendered peacefully on Aug. 4 after an eight-day, nationwide manhunt. Detectives were questioning the men Saturday. They could appear in court as early as Sunday. The men are accused of killing Trenton James Cornell-Duranleau, a Michigan native who had been living in Chicago, last month in Lathem's high-rise Chicago condo. Chicago police have said Cornell-Duranleau suffered more than 40 stab wounds, including "mutilations," to his upper body. Authorities say the attack was so violent the blade of the knife they believe was used was broken. They found Cornell-Duranleau's body July 27 after the building's front desk received an anonymous call that a crime had occurred on the 10th floor. He had been dead more than 12 hours. By then, authorities say Lathem and Warren had fled the city. According to autopsy results released Friday by the Cook County medical examiner's office, Cornell-Duranleau had methamphetamine in his system at the time of his death. Wyndham Lathem Credit: Chicago Police Department/PA Police say Lathem and Cornell-Duranleau, who moved to Chicago from the Grand Rapids, Michigan, area about a year ago, had a personal relationship, though they have not described the nature of it or a motive for the attack. It's unclear what the relationship was between Lathem, Cornell-Duranleau and Warren, who's British. He arrived in the U.S. three days before the killing, after being reported missing in Great Britain. Lathem, a microbiologist who's been on Northwestern's faculty since 2007 but was not teaching at the time of the attack, was terminated by the university for fleeing from police when there was an arrest warrant out for him. Investigators said the day after the crime was committed Lathem and Warren drove about 80 miles (128 kilometers) northwest of Chicago to Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. One of the men made a $1,000 donation to a local library in Cornell-Duranleau's name. Lake Geneva authorities said the man making the donation didn't give his name. Trenton James Cornell-Duranleau Credit: Facebook At another point after the killing, Lathem sent a video to friends and relatives apologizing for his involvement in the crime, which he called the "biggest mistake of my life." The video raised concern among investigators that Lathem might kill himself. Lathem and Warren both appeared in court in California last week, where they agreed to return to Illinois to face charges. An attorney for Lathem, Kenneth H. Wine, called him a "gentle soul" and said "what he is accused of is totally contrary to the way he has lived his entire life." Wine said Lathem intends to plead not guilty to the charges. Warren was represented by a public defender during a brief appearance in a San Francisco court. She said he is "presumed innocent," but declined to comment further. 


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Indian woman wins divorce over lack of toilet

Indian woman wins divorce over lack of toiletAn Indian court has given a woman permission to divorce her husband because their home did not have a toilet, forcing her to seek relief outdoors. Justice Rajendra Kumar Sharma said women in villages often endured physical pain waiting until darkness to relieve themselves outdoors. The judge labelled open defecation -- a major health problem in India -- disgraceful and deemed it torture to deny women a safe environment for relief, the woman's lawyer Rajesh Sharma told AFP.


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Iraq launches operation to take back IS-held town near Mosul

Iraq launches operation to take back IS-held town near MosulABU GHADDUR, Iraq (AP) — U.S.-backed Iraqi forces on Sunday launched a multi-pronged assault to retake the town of Tal Afar, west of Mosul, marking the next phase in the country's war on the Islamic State group.


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US Navy cruiser USS Indianapolis found 18,000 feet deep in Pacific Ocean

US Navy cruiser USS Indianapolis found 18,000 feet deep in Pacific OceanResearchers have found the wreckage of the US warship Indianapolis, which was sunk by a Japanese torpedo in the final days of World War Two, more than 18,000 feet (5.5 kilometres) below the surface of the Pacific Ocean, the Navy said on Saturday. USS Indianapolis Credit: The Telegraph/AP The cruiser was returning from its mission to deliver components for the atomic bomb that would soon be dropped on the Japanese city of Hiroshima when it was fired upon in the North Pacific Ocean by a Japanese submarine on July 30, 1945. It sunk in 12 minutes, according to the Naval History and Heritage Command in Washington. No distress signal was sent. About 800 of the 1,196 crew members aboard survived the sinking, but only 316 were rescued alive five days later, with the rest lost to exposure, dehydration, drowning and sharks. The World War II cruiser USS Indianapolis (CA 35), which was lost July 30, 1945 is seen off the Mare Island Navy Yard, California on July 12, 1945, after her final overhaul and repair of combat damage. Circles on photo mark alterations to the ship Credit:  REUTERS After a Navy historian unearthed new information in 2016 about the warship's last movements that pointed to a new search area, a team of civilian researchers led by Paul Allen, a Microsoft Corp co-founder, spent months searching in a 600-square-mile (1,500 sq km) patch of ocean. With a vessel rigged with equipment that can reach some of the deepest ocean floors, members of Allen's team found the wreckage somewhere in the Philippine Sea on Friday, Allen said in a statement on his website. The statement said the Navy had asked Allen to keep the precise location confidential. Wreckage of the USS Indianapolis, including the ship's bell  Credit: Courtesy of Paul G. Allen Allen said that the discovery was a humbling experience and a means of honoring sailors he saw as playing a vital role in ending World War Two. "While our search for the rest of the wreckage will continue, I hope everyone connected to this historic ship will feel some measure of closure at this discovery so long in coming," he said. Identification was easier than in some deep-sea expeditions: some of the exposed wreck was clearly marked with Indianapolis signage, according to photographs shared by Allen and the Navy. This undated image from a remotely operated underwater vehicle courtesy of Paul G. Allen, shows a spare parts box from the USS Indianapolis on the floor of the North Pacific Ocean Credit: Courtesy of Paul G. Allen "It is exceedingly rare you find the name of the ship on a piece of the wreckage," Paul Taylor, a spokesman for the Naval History and Heritage Command, said in a telephone interview. "If that's not Indianapolis then I don't know what is." The Navy said it had plans to honor the 22 survivors from the Indianapolis still alive along with the families of the ship's crew. 


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Iran parliament clears oil, foreign ministers for Rouhani's new cabinet

Iran parliament clears oil, foreign ministers for Rouhani's new cabinetBy Babak Dehghanpisheh BEIRUT (Reuters) - The Iranian parliament voted on Sunday to keep the oil and foreign ministers, two of pragmatist President Hassan Rouhani's key members of cabinet, in their posts. Oil Minister Bijan Zanganeh has been credited with the boost in Iran's crude output since many global sanctions were lifted last year and with a multi-billion-dollar deal with France's Total to develop South Pars, the world's largest gas field. Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif was Iran's lead negotiator in the landmark 2015 agreement in which Western powers agreed to rescind sanctions on the Islamic Republic in exchange for curbs on its disputed nuclear program.


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How Long Will the Total Solar Eclipse Last?

How Long Will the Total Solar Eclipse Last?Americans in some states will only witness seconds of it


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Father jumps car over open drawbridge in terrifying stunt to save family

Father jumps car over open drawbridge in terrifying stunt to save familyA father drove his car over an opening drawbridge in a death-defying stunt to avoid plunging into the water below. Terence Naphys was crossing New Jersey's Middle Thorofare Bridge with his family when its steel ramp began to lift beneath them. Mr Naphys was reportedly already near the centre of the bridge and was forced to accelerate his Toyota RAV 4 to jump the 6ft gap out of fear the car would fall 65ft into the deep bay below.


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Trump Tweets About Boston

Trump Tweets About Boston"Our great country has been divided for decades. Sometimes you need protest in order to heal, & we will heal, & be stronger than ever before!" he tweeted at one point.


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Spain identifies driver of Barcelona rampage van as hunt continues

Spain identifies driver of Barcelona rampage van as hunt continuesSpanish police said Monday they had identified the driver of a van that mowed down pedestrians in Barcelona, killing 13, as an international manhunt for the suspect believed to be a Moroccan national deepened. The 22-year-old Moroccan is believed to be the last remaining member of a 12-person cell still at large in Spain or abroad, with the others killed by police or detained over last week's twin attacks in Barcelona and the seaside resort of Cambrils. Investigators have honed in on an imam, Abdelbaki Es Satty, aged in his 40s, who is among the suspects and is believed to have radicalised youths in Ripoll, a small town at the foot of the Pyrenees.


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Flying dogs caught in action

Flying dogs caught in actionThese excited pooches are flying without wings in this series of hilarious images. Taken in July by photographer Peter Mueller, Each photo shows the canines’ exuberant facial expressions, as they appear to be leaping through the air.


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Evacuation orders affect hundreds in California, Oregon

Evacuation orders affect hundreds in California, OregonSISTERS, Ore. (AP) — Evacuation orders affecting hundreds of people were issued in California and Oregon as wildfires neared small towns, including one that's a prime location for viewing the eclipse.


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Syria's Assad says Western plots against him foiled but war not yet won

Syria's Assad says Western plots against him foiled but war not yet wonBy Suleiman Al-Khalidi AMMAN (Reuters) - Syrian President Bashar al-Assad said on Sunday his country had foiled Western designs to topple him but his army had not yet won the fight to end Syria's six-year-old insurgency. In an televised address, Assad said that even though there were signs of victory after six-and-a-half years of civil war, the "battle continues, and where we go later and it becomes possible to talk about victory...that's a different matter". "Their direct support - politically, economically and militarily - has made possible bigger advances on the battlefield and reduced the losses and burdens of war," Assad added.


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Man Caught Smuggling 13 Pounds of Meth Into US Via Drone

Man Caught Smuggling 13 Pounds of Meth Into US Via DroneDrones generally haven't appealed to smugglers because their noise attracts attention.


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Young Taiwanese choose China jobs over politics

Young Taiwanese choose China jobs over politicsTaiwan has long seen its international allies switching allegiance to an ascendant Beijing, but now there are also fears of a brain drain of the island's youth as they pursue careers in rival China. Cross-strait tensions have soared since China-sceptic Tsai Ing-wen took power last year, with Beijing cutting all official communication. China still sees the self-ruling island as part of its territory to be reunified, but young people in particular have increasingly developed a sense of pride in their Taiwanese identity.


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Boston 'free speech' rally dwarfed by thousands of counter-protesters

Boston 'free speech' rally dwarfed by thousands of counter-protestersEight people were arrested at a "Free Speech Rally" in Boston that organisers said "fell  apart" after it as dwarfed by a counter-protest against white nationalism. About 30 people attending the rally huddled on Boston Common's bandstand, their words drowned out by more than 10,000 counter-protesters. The two sides were kept more than 50 metres apart by fencing and police.  Trouble flared only briefly. At the end of the hour-long rally when the speakers were hustled into a police van that was quickly surrounded by a mob shouting "make them walk".  After a tense standoff police cleared a route away with a rolling blockade of motorbikes and bicycles.  Police said they made 27  arrests.  State and city police inspect people arriving for a "Free Speech" rally on Boston Common Credit: Michael Dwyer/AP  American police had feared radical bands of counter-protesters were adding acid to their arsenal of extreme violence as they tried to disrupt far Right rallies and protests. The US has endured a hot week of demonstrations and soul-searching as the country re-examines its troubled racial history and the fall-out from Donald Trump’s tumultuous presidency. Counterprotesters hold signs before conservative organizers begin a planned "Free Speech" rally on Boston Common, Saturday Credit: AP Photo/Michael Dwyer As free speech campaigners and counter-protesters gathered in Boston for the latest potential flashpoint on Saturday, officers said they were worried militants were armed with acid. “We think it’s what they had in Charlottesville,” said one policeman, dressed all in black and equipped with a body camera, referring to violence last weekend in Virginia. “They are using hydrochloric acid or battery acid. “Their tactic now seems to be to cause so much trouble that the event just gets shut down before it can even begin.” Counter protesters gather in Roxbury before marching to the 'Free Speech Rally' on Boston Common Credit: Scott Eisen/Getty Images A law enforcement official told the Boston Globe that officers were investigating reports that radical counter-protesters were planning to throw acid. More than 600 officers yesterday patrolled fences and concrete blockades arranged on Boston Common to keep two rival rallies apart as crowds began gathering. Among them were more than 100 so-called antifa Left-wingers, wearing black scarves over their faces who paraded across the common chanting: “Nazi scum, off our streets.” Police stand by as thousands of protesters prepare to march in Boston Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images They are becoming a familiar sight as white supremacists assert their right to rally, one side in a bitter summer of discontent. The Boston event had been three months in the planning but took on greater significance after clashes in Charlottesville where a 32-year-old woman, Heather Heyer, died when a car crashed into a crowd. Organisers of a the counter protest in Boston urged people to attend amid fears that members of the Ku Klux Klan and other white supremacy groups would be among those at the free speech rally. Although the rally organizers stress that they are not associated with any alt-right or white supremacist groups, the city of Boston and Police Commissioner William Evans are preparing for possible confrontations  Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images John Medlar, spokesman for Boston Free Speech which organised the rally, said such groups were not welcome. “We have made sure that one of the groups invited is not coming and have been clear that we are not neo Nazis. This has been misreported. We are only about free speech and have people from Left and Right speaking,” he said, referring to the part of the US constitution that guarantees free expression. Charlottesville far-right rally organiser is literally chased out of town 00:59 Among the confirmed guests were Joe Biggs, who used to work for the conspiracy-mongering website Infowars, as well as Shiva Ayyadurai, a scientist who claims to have invented email and is now running for the Senate. Police set strict limits banning protesters carrying anything that can be used as a weapon, as well as dogs and personal protection gear. However, that was not enough to prevent dozens of counter-protesters arriving with scarves over their faces and helmets. “It’s for protection,” said one man, who asked not to give his name. Charlottesville far-right protest In Dallas police used  horses to  break up a scuffle at a cemetery between people rallying against white supremacy and supporters of Confederate monuments. Officers riding on horseback had waited as the confrontation became more intense, but they moved in to break it up around 9 p.m. It happened at Pioneer Park, a Civil War cemetery that houses the memorial to Confederate soldiers. About 2,300 people, according to police estimates, showed up for a rally against racism at City Hall Plaza, not far from the cemetery. The group shouted," Take them down," referring to the monument.


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Muslims fear anti-Islam backlash in tolerant Barcelona

Muslims fear anti-Islam backlash in tolerant BarcelonaPrayer time is approaching but Raja Miah, an imam at a tiny mosque in the heart of Barcelona does not expect a big turnout. Since the twin attacks in Barcelona and the nearby seaside resort of Cambrils claimed by the Islamic State group, the Muslim community in central Barcelona's neighbourhood of Raval fears an anti-Islam backlash. "People are very scared," said Miah, 23, as he sat in a small room at the mosque in Raval as a small group of children in an adjoining room studied the Koran.


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Girl, 11, makes incredible recovery after friend poured boiling water over her during sleepover

Girl, 11, makes incredible recovery after friend poured boiling water over her during sleepoverAn 11-year-old girl has made an incredible recovery after a friend poured boiling water over her face at a sleepover. Jamoneisha “Jamoni” Merritt was rushed to hospital with horrific burns after Aniya Grant Stuart, 12, splashed scalding water onto her while she slept at a house in the Bronx, New York, on 7 August. Aniya was charged with felony assault after the incident, which was said to be a "prank" gone horribly wrong.


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Jason Kessler Account Tweets Heather Heyer Insult

Jason Kessler Account Tweets Heather Heyer InsultA neo-Nazi hacker claimed to have hijacked Kessler's account.


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Former Obama DHS Secretary: 'Confederate monuments are a threat to public safety'

Former Obama DHS Secretary: 'Confederate monuments are a threat to public safety'Former Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson said Confederate monuments are "becoming symbols and rallying points for white nationalism, for neo-Nazis, for the KKK."


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German writer critical of Turkey's Erdogan arrested in Spain

German writer critical of Turkey's Erdogan arrested in SpainBy Thomas Escritt BERLIN (Reuters) - German-Turkish author Dogan Akhanli was arrested in Spain on Saturday after Turkey issued an Interpol warrant for the writer, a critic of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's government, fanning an already fierce row between the NATO allies. The arrest of the German national in Granada was part of a "targeted hunt against critics of the Turkish government living abroad in Europe," Akhanli's lawyer Ilias Uyar told magazine Der Spiegel, which first reported Akhanli's detention. Any country can issue an Interpol "red notice", but extradition by Spain would only follow if Ankara could convince Spanish courts it had a real case against him.


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Suspect in killings of 2 Fla. officers arrested at bar

Suspect in killings of 2 Fla. officers arrested at barKISSIMMEE, Fla. (AP) — A police officer in Florida died from his injuries Saturday, a day after his colleague was killed when a suspect fired at them during a scuffle while they were on patrol. The suspect was later arrested at a bar.


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Elon Musk and 115 other experts ask the UN to ban killer robots in open letter

Elon Musk and 115 other experts ask the UN to ban killer robots in open letterElon Musk, Google DeepMind co-founder Mustafa Suleyman, and 114 other leading AI and robotics experts have joined together to ask the UN to ban the use of so-called killer robots in an open letter published today. The group is concerned about the potential use of lethal autonomous weapons and how they might be applied in the future, and they penned a short note released by the Future of Life Institute. The text was made public to kick off the opening of the International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI 2017) in Melbourne, Australia, according to a press release. "Lethal autonomous weapons" refers to the drones, autonomous machine guns, tanks, and other forms of weaponry controlled by AI on next-generation battlefields.  Musk, for one, is famously wary of AI's potential to go bad, recently calling it "the greatest threat we face as a civilization," above even nuclear weapons — but the open letter is the first time a group of AI and robotics companies have joined forces to petition the UN specifically about autonomous weapons, according to the release.  SEE ALSO: The world's most automated country moves toward setting a 'robot tax' The UN’s Review Conference of the Convention on Conventional Weapons had unanimously agreed to start formal discussions on the prohibition of autonomous weapons, and 19 of the member countries have already supported banning the killer robots outright. The group was slated to meet on Aug. 21, but has been delayed until November, according to Fortune. The open letter, which was signed by representatives from companies worth collectively billions of dollars across 26 countries, could put even more pressure to make a prohibition happen. One of the autonomous lethal weapons already out in the world.Image: future of life instituteThe actual text of the letter is short and stark. You can read it here, but we've included the most essential passage below: Co-signer Yoshua Bengio, a deep learning expert who founded Element AI, is concerned about more than just the immediate damage lethal autonomous weapons might cause. He cited the potential to "hurt the further development of AI’s good applications" by focusing on warfare and the inevitable backlash against the technology as a major reason for his participation in the effort.  The Future of Life Institute published a similar letter in 2015, which was signed by Musk, Stephen Hawking, and others with a message warning against the broader dangers of AI, not just those created for warfare.  The danger posed by non-military AI is much less pressing, which makes some of Musk's statements feel overblown and ridiculous and his self-important spat with Mark Zuckerberg more of a media spectacle than a debate with real stakes. But the potential for autonomous weapons to do damage, as the open letter states, is here now. Hopefully, the UN listens to the experts.  WATCH: Elon Musk's self-taught AI bot destroyed an esports pro in 'Dota 2'


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Mystery Qatari sheikh pushed into Gulf crisis spotlight

Mystery Qatari sheikh pushed into Gulf crisis spotlightTwo months into a bitter Gulf crisis, Saudi Arabia's use of a previously unknown Qatari royal family member has opened a new -- and bizarre -- front in the conflict. On August 17, it was announced that Saudi's King Salman had ordered the reopening of the Qatar border to allow pilgrims from the emirate to join the annual hajj pilgrimage to Mecca. The decision, at first glance an apparent thawing in a crisis ongoing since June 5, was apparently taken after Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman met an obscure member of Qatar's ruling dynasty, Sheikh Abdullah bin Ali bin Abdullah bin Jassim al-Thani.


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Two people killed in plane crash near Oregon airport where people plan to view solar eclipse

Two people killed in plane crash near Oregon airport where people plan to view solar eclipseAuthorities say two people died in a small plane crash near a central Oregon airport where people are gathering to view the solar eclipse. The Central Oregon Emergency Information Network says the pilot and a passenger were killed in the crash about 2 p.m. Saturday about a mile south of Madras Municipal Airport. Authorities did not identify the victims. The Federal Aviation Administration says the small plane was approaching a central Oregon airport when it crashed near where people are gathering to view the solar eclipse, the Oregonian/Oregonlive reports. FAA spokesman Ian Gregor says the plane that crashed Saturday was a single-engine, homebuilt Wheeler Express. The Oregonian/Oregonlive reports that the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating. Campers have been gathering at the airport for Monday's eclipse. About 200,000 people are expected in the area that's considered a prime viewing spot as the moon completely blots out the sun.


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How the Republican party quietly does the bidding of white supremacists | Russ Feingold

How the Republican party quietly does the bidding of white supremacists | Russ FeingoldLet us finally rip off the veneer that Trump’s affinity for white supremacy is distinct from the Republican agenda. The phony claimed outrage becomes dangerous if it convinces anyone that there is a distinction between Trump’s abhorrent comments and the Republican Party agenda. It is the unmasking of the Republican party leadership.


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SeaWorld: Former trainer says deaths of three killer whales a 'disgrace to humanity'

SeaWorld: Former trainer says deaths of three killer whales a 'disgrace to humanity'A former killer whale trainer at SeaWorld has spoken out about conditions at the attraction, after the deaths of three orcas there this year. Last week, Kasatka became the third killer whale at the Californian theme park to die. The orca was 41 years old, making her the oldest killer whale at SeaWorld in San Diego.


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Serena Williams' Fiancé Is A Little Shocked By Her Pregnancy Cravings

Serena Williams' Fiancé Is A Little Shocked By Her Pregnancy CravingsHe knew there would be cravings, but not quite like this.


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Plenty To Know Before The Solar Eclipse

Plenty To Know Before The Solar EclipseMonday's solar eclipse has generated a great deal of attention.


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Syrian army pounds rebel areas near Damascus after Russian brokered truce

Syrian army pounds rebel areas near Damascus after Russian brokered truceBy Suleiman Al-Khalidi AMMAN (Reuters) - Syrian jets and artillery struck rebel-held eastern Damascus suburbs on Saturday a day after a Russian sponsored ceasefire with a rebel group agreed a halt of fighting in the last opposition enclave in the capital, rebels and witnesses said. The Russian defense ministry said on Friday it had reached a ceasefire that took effect at 21.00 hrs Moscow time (1800 GMT) with Failaq al Rahman, the main Free Syrian Army (FSA) group fending off a two-month widescale Syrian army offensive in Jobar district and nearby town of Ain Tarma. A spokesman for Failaq al Rahman said both Jobar, which lies some 2 km (1.2 miles) east of the Old City wall, and nearby Ain Tarma on the edge of Eastern Ghouta witnessed army strikes and shelling soon after the ceasefire went into effect.


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Spain investigates missing imam, mysterious explosion

Spain investigates missing imam, mysterious explosionRIPOLL, Spain (AP) — A missing imam and a house that exploded days ago became the focus Saturday of the investigation into an extremist cell responsible for two deadly attacks in Barcelona and a nearby resort, as authorities narrowed in on who radicalized a group of young men in northeastern Spain.


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Crowds rally in Hong Kong after activists jailed

Crowds rally in Hong Kong after activists jailedThousands of supporters of three jailed young democracy activists took to the streets in Hong Kong Sunday to protest their sentences. Joshua Wong, Nathan Law and Alex Chow, leaders of the 2014 Umbrella Movement rallies, were sentenced to six to eight months in jail Thursday for their role in a protest that sparked the months-long demonstrations calling for democratic reforms. People took on the scorching summer heat to stream from the district of Wan Chai to the Court of Final Appeal in the heart of Hong Kong Island, protesting the jail terms.


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11 Unique Pulled Pork Recipes That Aren’t Sandwiches

11 Unique Pulled Pork Recipes That Aren’t SandwichesSince pulled pork is so tasty and versatile, it’d be a shame to waste it on the same old barbecue sandwich recipe you’ve been using for generations. Since the sky is essentially the limit, make it into a chili or a soup, add some spices for a Mexican-style meal, or throw it into your favorite comfort food. Get our Pulled Pork Nachos recipe.


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The eclipse: From ancient paganism to American history, it's been a thing

The eclipse: From ancient paganism to American history, it's been a thingNothing reminds us that we are on a celestial island surrounded by the abyss like watching our planet's energy source turn into a gaping black hole.  But don't take my word for it. From occult and pagan lore to American history and yes, Hollywood, solar eclipses have been harbingers of doom, transformation, and revolution since time immemorial.  And can't you just ... feel it? SEE ALSO: 20 questions you're too embarrassed to ask about the solar eclipse At a time when the fabric of American reality appears on the verge of collapse, maybe we can take comfort in the ancient beliefs that an eclipse isn't just a phenomenon. It's a sign. Everyone, particularly the Deadhead-like eclipse hunters called "Shadow Chasers," is blowing their lids over this particular one taking place on Monday. We are all now part of a tradition that has governed humans since the dawn of man — looking upward to remember that we are at the mercy of a cosmic dance indifferent to our inner worlds.  As one Redditor put it on the "occult" thread, the eclipse is a coming together of "light and dark, symbolizing the unification of good and evil." Other online occult experts like the Academy of the Pagan Path say that since solar eclipses "can only occur during the day, on a new moon," it's a great time to take advantage of that unique blend of energy toward "planting new seeds and ideas." Even NASA admits that, while it may not cause any evident physical effects in people, there's something here: The eclipse even has our no-nonsense nerds sounding like vague, prophetic philosophers.  Much like our future, outer space is hella femaleImage: GETTY IMAGESBut NASA's right about one thing: Belief shapes reality. Wars waged in the name of religion have slaughtered millions since the genesis of society. Pagan rituals practiced thousands of years ago still inspire the same psychological effects in modern people that they did to our earliest ancestors. So, in celebration of our astrological insignificance, let's dive into a brief, abridged human history of the solar eclipse. May your reckoning be delicious. A tale as old as pre-history It's hard to choose from the countless, ageless, globally-shared legends about solar eclipses. The most ancient records endure to this day, etched in stone.  Five thousand years ago, neolithic man built a circle of cairns in Loughcrew, Ireland. Despite lacking all the precise modern knowledge needed to predict an eclipse accurately, the ancient Irish created a monument that aligned with the solar eclipse of 3340 B.C.E. A millennia before the Chinese even started using paper, they carved solar eclipses into "oracle" bones that date back to 2100 B.C.  Drombeg prehistoric stone circle, County Cork, IrelandImage: UIG via Getty ImagesEclipses were believed to be signals of turmoil, but political turmoil in particular.  In ancient Chinese culture, the sun symbolized the Emperor and the moon a dragon, so the solar eclipses was seen attacks on the ruler to be warded off. Two court astronomers were beheaded for failing to anticipate them. Many shared this common view of solar eclipses as a devouring of divine beings. Vietnamese legends believed the culprit to be a giant frog, while the Vikings saw wolves. Hindu belief interprets eclipses as the decapitated head of the deity Rahu being chucked into the sky. The ancient Greeks viewed the uncanny event as a sign of certain doom. The poet Archilochus described the 647 B.C.E. eclipse as such:  It could also work in reverse. In 585 B.C., “The Battle of the Eclipse” saw the warring Lydians and Medes lay down their weapons, and end a decade-long battle in the husk of the unnatural twilight. The truly great American eclipses Closer to home, eclipses have been tied to events of revolution. Two reportedly occurred during the Revolutionary War, and were used to demonstrate a cultural shift away from the religious and mystical and toward the scientific. But beyond justifying American exceptionalism, solar eclipses are embedded in the African American struggle for liberty, too. In 1791, self-taught black astronomer Benjamin Banneker correctly calculated the eclipse date, contradicting most respected mathematicians. Banneker then sent Thomas Jefferson a mic-drop of a letter, along with a copy of his meticulous work. Banneker wrote that he was "recommending to you and all others, to wean yourselves from those narrow prejudices which you have imbibed with respect to [my brethren]." Benjamin Banneker's Alamack, 1792. Sent to Thomas Jefferson proving Af-Ams created intellectually equal. https://t.co/TotyNGqZYM … pic.twitter.com/3UZFjCvG2M — Leandra Bernstein (@LeandraB_sbg) August 18, 2017 And most famously — as depicted in Nate Parker's The Birth of a Nation — enslaved African-American Nat Turner interpreted one eclipse he witnessed in February 1831 as a black man's hand reaching for the sun, a sign that he should launch a revolt.  After a second eclipse in August, his plans came to fruition, and 70 freed slaves joined him in liberating plantations all over Virginia, a moment widely interpreted as a precursor to the Civil War. We suggest Trump and his neo-Nazi buddies take note. Total eclipse of the pop culture heart As a modern iteration of myth, eclipses have also captured the imagination of our greatest contemporary creators. (And no, we're not talking about Bonnie Tyler's love ballad.) Solar eclipses are even vaguely referenced in the largest cultural phenomenon of our time, Game of Thrones, with its opening sequence showing the orbital ribbons of an astrolabe blotting out a spinning sun over a map of Westeros in certain frames. Stanley Kubrik's groundbreaking 2001: A Space Odyssey opens on the eclipse of star from space. The title card explodes across the scene, with Richard Strauss' famed trumpets sounding off a revolution in the entire filmmaking industry. Known as one of the most highly ranked Simpsons episodes ever, "Marge vs. the Monorail" opens on yet another example of the blue-haired matriarch sacrificing her own enjoyment and self-fullfilment for her family.  She gives the ever-unprepared Homer her protective eyewear. But, unable to keep herself from missing out on the wonder, Marge looks up anyway — only to blind herself and incite the revelatory character arc of the episode. Meanwhile Mad Men, which often referenced cultural cosmic events (like the first satellite image of Earth), featured the July 1963 solar eclipse in the Season 3 episode "Seven Twenty Three." In the episode, each character's reaction to the celestial reckoning reveals core aspects of their character.  Betty must have her eyes shielded by Henry. Don, on the other hand, thinks he is above the rules of mere mortals, and looks directly into it with sunglasses while the others aren't watching. Who knows what the coming solar eclipse will inspire in 2017, a year of unprecedented events. Maybe for once, these notions of political upheaval and transformations will finally be quantifiably true. We're holding out for a rapture that vaporizers the haters right off the planet.  WATCH: How to watch the solar eclipse without burning your eyes out


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Trump struggles with presidential duties as uniter-in-chief

Trump struggles with presidential duties as uniter-in-chiefWASHINGTON (AP) — For Susan Bro, mother of the woman killed at a rally organized by white supremacists, the president of the United States can offer no healing words.


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How high is air pollution in your city and how does it compare to the most polluted cities in the world?

How high is air pollution in your city and how does it compare to the most polluted cities in the world?Pollution is a greater global threat than Ebola and HIV, according to warnings by the World Health Organisation.  According to its recent report, one in four deaths among children aged under five are now due to environmental hazards such as air pollution and contaminated water. Previously this year, air pollution levels in London were worse than those in Beijing for a brief period - with the UK capital's pollutants frequently breaking UK limits.  Now, the UK Government plans to tackle such dangers by banning diesel and petrol cars by 2040. But how bad is air pollution in other areas of the UK? Search for your postcode to see how bad air pollution is in your area How high is air pollution in your area? How does the UK compare to the world? According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), London is just a mid-table city when it comes to the international league table of polluted places. London only ranked 1,389th out of the nearly  3,000 cities and towns around the world monitored in the WHO's database of annual air pollution readings. Which cities have the worst air pollution levels? WHO guidelines state that cities should aim to have an annual average of no more than 10 micrograms of PM2.5 (very fine particulate matter) for every cubic metre of air. London had an annual PM2.5 average of 15 μg/m3 in 2013, far lower than Beijing's average of 85.2 μg/m3. These particles are very small in diameter and are classed as carcinogenic by leading health organisations. Thousands of deaths a year are attributable to air pollution in the UK. London pollution - what causes it and how can you stay safe? 01:33 Which cities have the highest air pollution levels worldwide? According to the WHO, the most polluted city in the world is Zabol in Iran. Zabol's PM2.5 measurements were found to average a massive 217 μg/m3 for the latest available year - more than 20 times higher than the recommended level. The next two entries on the list are both located in India (Gwalior and Allahabad) while the first non-Asian city on the list is Bamenda in Cameroon which came in eighth place.  Tetovo in Macedonia was the most polluted European city in the database, followed by Tuzla in  Bosnia and Herzegovina. The most polluted city in the UK isn't actually London. Glasgow topped that list, followed by Scunthorpe and Leeds with London in sixth place. However, given that these rankings are based on figures taken in 2013, the situation may have changed since. London may also experience greater peaks in air pollution but these figures are all annual averages. Table - The 100 most air polluted cities in the world Asian cities tend to be more polluted The WHO's database is by no means a comprehensive list of every city in the world - many places will simply not be able to provide air pollution figures of sufficient quality to be included. However, from the figures available, Asian cities were the likeliest to exceed the 10 μg/m3 guideline for PM2.5. Just four of the 632 Asian locations included in the data were found to be below this level, meaning that the equivalent of 99.4 per cent of Asian cities exceeded it. African cities were the next most likely to annually exceed their recommended levels of air pollution while towns and cities in Oceania were the least likely.


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Girl found 'brutally murdered' at home after texting mother about someone knocking at door

Girl found 'brutally murdered' at home after texting mother about someone knocking at doorYhoana Arteaga was found bludgeoned to death in her family's mobile home with her clothing "in disarray", police said. There was no evidence of forced entry to the trailer in Nashville, Tennessee. The girl had suffered blunt force trauma to her body, police spokesman Don Aaron told a press conference.


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Pakistan holds state funeral for German nun who fought leprosy

Pakistan holds state funeral for German nun who fought leprosyPakistani soldiers on Saturday carried the flag-draped coffin of German-born Catholic nun Ruth Pfau to a state funeral where she was honored after devoting her life to eradicating leprosy in the country. Widely known as Pakistan's Mother Teresa, Pfau died last week in the southern city of Karachi at age 87. Mourners paid their last respects as Pfau's coffin was carried to the Marie Adelaide Leprosy Centre that she founded before being taken on to St. Patrick's Cathedral for the official service.


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Palestinian in West Bank attack bid killed: Israel police

Palestinian in West Bank attack bid killed: Israel policeA Palestinian teenager who tried to attack an Israeli border guard in the occupied West Bank with a knife on Saturday was shot dead, an Israeli police spokeswoman said. The Palestinian health ministry identified the teenager as Qoteiba Yussef Zahran from the Tulkarm region in the northern West Bank. The Israeli spokeswoman said one of the border guards suffered a slight leg injury during the incident, but did not say clearly if he had been stabbed by the Palestinian.


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Nearly 600 dead in S. Asia floods

Nearly 600 dead in S. Asia floodsNearly 600 people have died and millions have been affected by monsoon floods in South Asia, officials said Saturday, as relief and rescue operations continued. Indian authorities sought military help in two districts of northern Uttar Pradesh state after fresh heavy rains left hundreds of villages marooned. "We have sought army's help to reach out to the affected people," T P Gupta, a senior official from the state's disaster management authority, told AFP.


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Ben & Jerry's Releases The Most Genius Ice Cream Yet

Ben & Jerry's Releases The Most Genius Ice Cream YetChocolate lovers are going to freak out.


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Solar Eclipse To Cost US Nearly $700M In Lost Productivity

Solar Eclipse To Cost US Nearly $700M In Lost ProductivityResearch says the time loss could be a good way to boost company morale.


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Herald Sun | Top Stories
last updated: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 09:41:00 GMT

Response from Eddie, AFL not nearly enough
THERE'S so much wrong about the Eddie McGuire-James-Brayshaw-Danny Frawley pack mentality attack of Caroline Wilson. As was the AFL's insipid response on Monday.

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Secret tape not the only talking point
THE reasons behind a decision to release a secret expletive-laden recording of former Chief Justice Tim Carmody are almost as juicy as the tape is expected to be.

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Digg Top Stories
last updated: Sun, 20 Aug 2017 23:31:15 +0000

Rolls-Royce Is Pop Music's Hottest Brand
With the ascension of hip-hop, brand references became a shorthand for aspiration and status in popular music.

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Ten sailors missing after U.S. warship, tanker collide near Singapore
SINGAPORE (Reuters) - Ten sailors are missing and five were injured after a U.S. warship collided with an oil tanker east of Singapore on Monday, the U.S. Navy said, the second accident involving U.S. Navy destroyers in Asian waters in little more than two months.

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BuzzFeed - Latest
last updated: Mon, 21 Aug 2017 01:29:53 -0400

Under Pressure

This Is What It’s Like To Be A Paramedic In London


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TIME
last updated:

After a Punishing Week, Trump Hopes to Redirect Attention With an Address on Afghanistan
The U.S. has been at odds for months over its 16-year involvement in Afghanistan

(WASHINGTON) — President Donald Trump will use a nationally televised address to outline for a war-weary nation the strategy he believes will best position the U.S. to eventually declare victory in Afghanistan after 16 years of combat and lives lost.

The speech Monday night will also give Trump a chance for a reset after one of the most difficult weeks of his short presidency.

Trump tweeted Saturday that he had reached a decision on the way forward in Afghanistan, a day after he reviewed war options with his national security team at a meeting at Camp David, Maryland. The president offered no clues about whether he would send thousands more U.S. troops into Afghanistan or exercise his authority as commander in chief to order that they be withdrawn from America’s longest war.

But signs pointed in the direction of Trump continuing the U.S. commitment there.

The top U.S. commander in Afghanistan on Sunday hailed the launch of the Afghan Army’s new special operations corps and declared that “we are with you and we will stay with you.”

Trump scheduled a 9 p.m. EDT Monday address to the nation and U.S. troops stationed at the Army’s Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall. Next door to the base is Arlington National Cemetery, the final resting place for many of the U.S. troops who died fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan.

It will be Trump’s first formal address to the nation outside of his late February speech to a joint session of Congress. And it follows one of the most trying weeks for the president, who generated a firestorm of criticism after he appeared to equate neo-Nazis and white supremacists with the counter-protesters who opposed them during a deadly clash, with racial overtones, two weekends ago in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Trump blamed “very fine people, on both sides” for the confrontation in which a woman was killed and more than a dozen people were injured. The comments triggered rebukes from elected and former elected leaders in both political parties, and corporate leaders signaled a lack of confidence in Trump by resigning from a pair of White House advisory boards, among other expressions of dissent over his comments.

In Afghanistan, Gen. John Nicholson’s comments suggested the Pentagon may have won its argument that U.S. military must remain engaged in order to ensure that terrorists aren’t again able to threaten the U.S. from havens inside of Afghanistan.

Nicholson, who spoke before the announcement about Trump’s speech, said the commandos and a plan to double the size of the Afghan special operations forces are critical to winning the war.

“I assure you we are with you in this fight. We are with you and we will stay with you,” Nicholson said during a ceremony at Camp Morehead, a training base for Afghan commandoes southeast of Kabul.

The Pentagon was awaiting a final announcement by Trump on a proposal to send in nearly 4,000 more U.S. troops. The added forces would increase training and advising of the Afghan forces and bolster counterterrorism operations against the Taliban and an Islamic State group affiliate trying to gain a foothold in the country.

The administration had been at odds for months over how to craft a new Afghan war strategy amid frustrations that the conflict had stalemated some 16 years after the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

The Afghan government controls just half of the country and is beset by endemic corruption and infighting.

The Islamic State group (ISIS) has been hit hard but continues to attempt major attacks, insurgents still find safe harbor in Pakistan, and Russia, Iran and others are increasingly trying to shape the outcome. At this point, everything the U.S. military has proposed points to keeping the Afghan government in place and struggling to turn a dismal quagmire around.

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, who visited Afghanistan over the weekend, declared himself satisfied with how the administration had formulated its new strategy. But he refused to discuss details before Trump’s announcement.

Afghan military commanders have been clear that they want and expect continued U.S. military help.

Among elected leaders in the U.S., opinions were mixed about America’s future role in Afghanistan.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich, who last year challenged Trump for the Republican presidential nomination, favors withdrawing the approximately 8,400 U.S. troops currently in Afghanistan — not sending in more.

“I think we should begin to leave and then I think we should reserve the opportunity and the right, with proper basing of our forces in the region, to be able to strike, if we think that there is an effort being made to create another launching pad,” Kasich said Sunday on CNN’s State of the Union. “But just to stay there after 16 years, I want our people to be able to come home.”

Sen. Tim Kaine, a Virginia Democrat and member of the Foreign Relations Committee, said he was more interested at this point in hearing Trump’s overall plan before any talk about troop levels.

“The troop strength question is sort of the cart before the horse. The real question is what is our strategy?” Kaine said on CBS’ Face the Nation. ”And then when you lay out the strategy, then the troop strength question can kind of answer itself.”

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