Reuters: Technology News
last updated: Tue, 27 Sep 2016 16:01:05 -0400

Senators accuse Yahoo of 'unacceptable' delay in hack discovery
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Six senators on Tuesday demanded that Yahoo Inc explain why hackers' theft of user information for 500 million accounts two years ago came to light only last week and called the company's handling of the breach "unacceptable."

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BBC News - Technology
last updated: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 00:55:44 GMT

Facebook told to stop collecting German WhatsApp data
Facebook has been ordered to stop collecting German WhatsApp data by the Hamburg privacy regulator.

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PC World - News RSS feed
last updated: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 04:44:00 +1000

Make a Wi-Fi gadget with a $9.99 Orange Pi development board
If you want to fashion a smart gadget, robot or drone with wireless capabilities on the cheap, a $9.99 development board from Orange Pi will help you reach that goal.

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Tech News Headlines - Yahoo News
last updated: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 00:21:10 -0400

Senators accuse Yahoo of 'unacceptable' delay in hack discovery

File photo of Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer delivering her keynote address at the annual Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las VegasBy Dustin Volz and Lisa Lambert WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Six senators on Tuesday demanded that Yahoo Inc explain why hackers' theft of user information for 500 million accounts two years ago came to light only last week and called the company's handling of the breach "unacceptable." The lawmakers, all Democrats, said they were "disturbed" that the 2014 intrusion, which was disclosed by the company on Thursday, was detected so long after it occurred. "That means millions of Americans’ data may have been compromised for two years," the senators wrote in a letter to Yahoo Chief Executive Marissa Mayer. "This is unacceptable." A Yahoo spokesman said the company would respond in a "timely and appropriate manner" to the letter, which was signed by Senators Patrick Leahy, Al Franken, Elizabeth Warren, Richard Blumenthal, Ron Wyden and Edward Markey.


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‘Worst storm in decades’ hits SA
THE violent weather system is heading up the east coast, with thousands of home losing power as they were lashed with 80km/h winds.

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Future champ a long-haul truckie called Bob
TECH strategist Kathy Reid imagines a contrarian world where robots rely on humans for their survival. And truck drivers co-exist with self-driving vehicles.

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The rare Australian weather event you’ve never heard of
IT’S gigantic, tears the sky in two and stretches to the horizon but this rare phenomenon has a very Aussie way of telling you it’s coming.

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Australia is officially addicted to the web
ARE you addicted to the internet? A new study shows Aussies are spending a staggering amount of time online compared to just two years ago.

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This company will let you rent Yeezys
HAVE you ever tried to secure a pair of Kanye West’s Yeezys only to realise how quick they sell out? Well, a new company has a rather expensive solution.

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CNET News
last updated: Tue, 27 Sep 2016 22:40:08 +0000

Google could soon bring free Wi-Fi to your bus - CNET
The company originally helped connect Indian train stations with free Wi-Fi, and now wants to bring that service to the world.

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BuzzFeed - Geeky
last updated: Sat, 24 Sep 2016 03:06:04 -0400
Tech – TIME
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Yahoo’s Password Breach Could Have Wide-reaching Consequences
Yahoo users who recycle the same password across the Internet may still be at risk

(LONDON) — As investors and investigators weigh the damage of Yahoo’s massive breach to the internet icon, information security experts worry that the record-breaking haul of password data could be used to open locks up and down the web.

While it’s unknown to what extent the stolen data has been or will be circulating — or how easy it would be to use if it were — giant breaches can send ripples of insecurity across the internet.

“Data breaches on the scale of Yahoo are the security equivalent of ecological disasters,” said Matt Blaze, a security researcher who directs the Distributed Systems Lab at the University of Pennsylvania, in a message posted to Twitter .

A big worry is a cybercriminal technique known as “credential stuffing,” which works by throwing leaked username and password combinations at a series of websites in an effort to break in, a bit like a thief finding a ring of keys in an apartment lobby and trying them, one after the other, in every door in the building. Software makes the trial-and-error process practically instantaneous.

Credential stuffing typically succeeds between 0.1 percent and 2 percent of the time, according to Shuman Ghosemajumder, the chief technology officer of Mountain View, California-based Shape Security. That means cybercriminals wielding 500 million passwords could conceivably hijack tens of thousands of other accounts.

“It becomes a numbers game for them,” Ghosemajumder said in a telephone interview.

So will the big Yahoo breach mean an explosion of smaller breaches elsewhere, like the aftershocks that follow a big quake?

That seems unlikely given that Yahoo says the “vast majority” of its passwords were stored in an encrypted form believed to be difficult to unscramble. On the other hand, Yahoo said the theft occurred in late 2014, meaning that hackers have had as many as two years to try to decipher the data.

Ghosemajumder said he didn’t see a surge in new breaches so much as a steady increase in attempts as cybercriminals replenish their stock of freshly hacked passwords.

The first hint that something was wrong at Yahoo came when Motherboard journalist Joseph Cox started receiving supposed samples of credentials hacked from the company in early July. Several weeks later, a cybercriminal using the handle “Peace” came forward with 5,000 samples — and the startling claim to be selling 200 million more.

On Aug. 1 Cox published a story on the sale , but the journalist said he never established with any certainty where Peace’s credentials came from. He noted that Yahoo said most of its passwords were secured with one encryption protocol, while Peace’s sample used a second. Either Peace drew his sample from a minority of Yahoo data or he was dealing with a different set of data altogether.

“With the information available at the moment, it’s more likely to be the latter,” Cox said in an email Tuesday.

The Associated Press has been unable to locate Peace. The darknet market where the seller has been active in the past has been inaccessible for days, purportedly due to cyberattacks.

At the moment it’s not known who holds the passwords or whether a state-sponsored actor, which Yahoo has blamed for the breach, would ever have an interest in passing its data to people like Peace .

Even if the hack was a straightforward espionage operation, Gartner security analyst Avivah Litan said that wouldn’t be a reason to relax. Spies can mine trivial-seeming data from apparently random citizens to tease out their real targets’ secrets.

“That’s how intelligence works,” Litan said in a phone call.

Meanwhile Yahoo users who recycle the same password across the internet may still be at risk. While people can always change the passwords across all the sites they use, Yahoo’s announcement that some security questions were compromised too means that the risks associated with the breach are likely to linger.

A password can be changed, after all, but how do you reset your mother’s maiden name?

 

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Twitter / liamalexander
last updated: Mon, 08 Oct 2012 07:22:42 +0000

liamalexander: My daily stats: 12 new followers, 9 new unfollowers via http://t.co/hROlspGI
liamalexander: My daily stats: 12 new followers, 9 new unfollowers via http://t.co/hROlspGI

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Twitter / Favorites from liamalexander
last updated: Mon, 25 Apr 2011 22:44:57 +0000

alanjonesUK: RT @PopSci: Scientists finally have some answers about the mysterious "dark matter" in the human genome: http://t.co/Gm4Fh0B6
alanjonesUK: RT @PopSci: Scientists finally have some answers about the mysterious "dark matter" in the human genome: http://t.co/Gm4Fh0B6

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Ask the Guru
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Captain marketing phone number - We are a SEO, SEM, and online advertising firm based in Los Angeles. Our experts specialize in search engine optimization, Intern

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Stumble
last updated: Fri, 25 Feb 2011 22:09:20 +0000
The Next Web
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Meet the world’s first baby born from the DNA of 3 parents

After two children died of a rare disease and a total of four miscarriages, a woman gave birth to a baby boy in what experts are calling a ‘revolutionary’ medical event. The boy, now six-months-old, was conceived using a controversial fertility treatment meant to help people conceive who carry genes for rare diseases. The disease, in this case, is Leigh syndrome, a rare neurological disorder that’s generally fatal. The mother is a carrier for the rare disease, and although she’s healthy, her DNA holds a gene that is later passed on to her children. Leigh syndrome typically progresses quickly and leads…

This story continues at The Next Web

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