Yahoo News - Top Stories
last updated: Sun, 24 Jul 2016 06:27:46 -0400

IOC faces historic call on Russia Rio ban

International Olympic Committee (IOC) president Thomas Bach pictured in Lausanne in JuneThe International Olympic Committee held showdown talks Sunday on whether to ban Russia from the Rio Games over state-run doping, an unprecedented decision that could spark the Olympic movement's worst crisis in decades. An independent report from the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) said Russia's sports ministry directed a vast doping programme with support from the state intelligence agency that saw thousands of tainted urine samples destroyed or swapped for clean ones. The cheating affected 30 sports and went on during the 2014 Sochi Games and other major Olympic and international events, according to the WADA report released last week by Canadian law professor Richard McLaren.


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15 Most Stressful Jobs in the World

Everyone has a bad day at work now and then. But if you have one of these 15 Most Stressful Jobs in the World, even one bad day can get you or someone else killed. From EMT to Coal Miner to Ice Road Trucker, these are the jobs that will keep you up at nights!


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Herald Sun | Breaking News
last updated: Thu, 19 May 2016 03:08:00 GMT

Terror strikes in Munich
AT LEAST eight people are dead after gunmen opened fire at a shopping mall in Munich, in what German police say “looks like a terrorist attack”.

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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Sat, 23 Jul 2016 15:21:12 -0400

White supremacists energized by Trump

David Duke (ABC News)Former KKK grand wizard David Duke announces a bid for the Senate and likens his immigration policy to Trump's.


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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Sat, 23 Jul 2016 14:32:37 -0400

White supremacists energized by Trump

David Duke (ABC News)Former KKK grand wizard David Duke announces a bid for the Senate and likens his immigration policy to Trump's.


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Boy Scouts thrive after easing of gay ban

Boy Scouts in San Francisco. (Getty Images)The group is faring well nearly a year after it eased its ban on participation by openly gay adults.


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Burned body found as wildfires menace Calif.

A fast-burning wildfire in the Angeles National Forest, Calif., on July 23. (Ryan Babroff/AP)Detectives investigate the scene of a blaze north of L.A. that prompted the evacuation of 1,500 homes.


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Trump: France, others may face 'extreme vetting'

Donald Trump on July 21 at the GOP convention. (Carolyn Kaster/AP)People from countries hit by terrorism could be prevented from entering the U.S., he says in an interview.


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Munich mall killer researched killing sprees

Police officers in MunichDescribed as calm and shy, he had 300 bullets in his backpack when he began shooting.


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A beaming Hillary Clinton introduces Tim Kaine

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., arrive at a rally at Florida International University. (Andrew Harnik/AP)Sen. Tim Kaine called Hillary Clinton his soulmate on Saturday, in his first appearance as her vice presidential pick.


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Clinton VP pick Kaine tried to shame Congress on ISIS

Tim Kaine smiles as he takes the stage with Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. (Andrew Harnik/AP)In 2014, Clinton's new running mate asked his colleagues to put political risk aside and vote on Obama's escalating war.


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Poll: Support grows for stricter gun laws

The Smith & Wesson booth at a trade show in Las Vegas in January. (John Locher/AP)Americans increasingly favor tougher laws, but they also say change is unlikely to happen anytime soon, a survey shows.


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Police: Munich shooter had no ISIS link

Police officers stand guard near the Olympia shopping mall in Munich, where Friday's shooting rampage started. (Karl-Josef Hildenbrand/EFE/EPA)The teenager suspected of killing nine people was obsessed with mass shootings and apparently acted alone, officials say.


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Live blog: Teen's shooting rampage in Munich

Police officers stand guard near the Olympia shopping mall in Munich, where Friday's shooting rampage started. (Karl-Josef Hildenbrand/EFE/EPA)A gunman kills at least nine people and injures many more at a shopping center before killing himself.


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Clinton slams Trump's RNC as VP pick looms

Clinton slams Trump's RNC hours before making VP announcementThe presumptive Democratic nominee says the GOP convention was "dark" and isolationist.


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Rio security push crumbles as murders rise

Alleged drug traffickers in Rio. (AP)The Summer Olympics host city has seen a sharp increase in violence, including scores of police killings.


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Obama rejects Trump's 'chaos everywhere'

President Obama reacts to Donald Trump's acceptance speech. (AP)The president refutes the GOP nominee’s assertion in his acceptance speech that the U.S. is rife with violence.


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Officer says he was trying to shoot patient

Behavioral therapist Charles Kinsey was lying on the ground with his hands in the air telling the officer he was unarmed. (ABC News)The police officer who shot and wounded an unarmed mental health worker was aiming at the autistic patient.


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Mayhem in Munich: Mall attack kills at least 8

The third attack on civilians in Europe in barely a week saw panicked shoppers fleeing the Olympia (OEZ) mall in Munich as police launched a massive operationElite German police have launched a manhunt for at least three gunman believed to be armed with long guns.


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Former KKK leader to run for the U.S. Senate

Former KKK leader David Duke. (AP)Avowed white supremacist David Duke announces his candidacy for the Louisiana seat being vacated by David Vitter.


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'Several dead' in Munich shooting: Police

Firefighter and police respond to a shooting at a shopping center in Munich. (Matthias Balk/EPA)German authorities say multiple people have been killed and others wounded at a shopping center.


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The rise and fall of Fox News’ Roger Ailes

Roger Ailes (Getty Images)The now-deposed Ailes rose to power 20 years ago and was an unparalleled kingmaker in TV news and the GOP.


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Wife's tribute begins Baton Rouge funerals

Baton Rouge memorial (AP)The service for Matthew Gerald began a somber period of mourning for three Louisiana officers killed by a gunman.


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Officer: Black people have 'violent tendencies'

Breaion King describes being pulled from her car and thrown to the ground by an Austin police officer during a traffic stop in 2015. (Rodolfo Gonzalez/Austin American-Statesman via AP)The video of an officer throwing a woman to the ground surfaces amid tension over police brutality.


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Celebrating Prince George's 3rd birthday

Britain's Prince George with the family dog, Lupo. (Matt Porteous/Duke and Duchess of Cambridge/Handout via REUTERS)Photographs of the 3-year-old prince are in huge demand from the world's media.


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Everything is terrible and 'I alone can fix it'

Donald TrumpDonald Trump used his acceptance speech to describe an America being torn apart by crime and violence that only he can stop.


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RNC Diaries: Trump dazzles the GOP faithful

Yahoo NewsTrump friends and foes reflect on the fourth and final day of a turbulent convention.


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Photos: On the ground at the GOP convention
Photos: On the ground at the GOP conventionVishavjit Singh of NYC, wearing a Captain America outfit, demonstrates with security personnel behind him. (Photo: Khue Bui for Yahoo News)

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Fact check: Trump re-airs debunked claims

Donald Trump (AP)Donald Trump promised "the truth, and nothing else" in his convention speech, but he may not have delivered.


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Trump: Clinton’s weak, and we will do better

Trump promises ‘law and order,’ amid divided GOPThe billionaire formally accepts the GOP nomination and asserts "things have to change – and they have to change right now."


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Trump: Clinton’s weak, and we will do better
The billionaire formally accepts the GOP nomination and asserts "things have to change – and they have to change right now."

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Democrats berate RNC's 'lock her up' attitude

A delegate at the Republican National Convention holds up an anti-Hillary Clinton sign. (Reuters)Sen. Cory Booker vows there will be no such cries when his party meets  next week.


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The Unconventional Diaries: Cruz stirs the pot

The Unconventional DiariesTrump supporters and critics weigh in on Ted Cruz's contentious RNC speech and more.


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Eric Trump portrays dad as hero of working class

Eric Trump points toward his father during his speech at the RNC. (AP)Donald Trump’s second-youngest son insists his father is the candidate who will truly help struggling Americans.


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Cruz booed after refusing to endorse Trump

People react to Ted Cruz as he addresses delegates during the third day session of the Republican convention. (Matt Rourke/AP)“We deserve leaders who stand for principle, unite us all behind shared values,” said Ted Cruz.


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Pence casts himself as un-Trump, but pro-Trump

Donald Trump and Mike Pence (AP)Donald Trump's pick for VP introduced himself to the country on Wednesday as man with modest, All-American roots who holds to impeccable conservative credentials.


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Ann Coulter: Pence a 'stupid choice' for VP

Ann Coulter (Reuters)The conservative commentator tells Yahoo News why she's disappointed by Donald Trump's pick for his running mate.


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Gingrich tries to play peacemaker at RNC

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich (John Minchillo/AP)The former House Speaker is put in a tough spot after Ted Cruz sets the arena abuzz for the wrong reasons.


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Third Eye Blind's insulting RNC city show

Rock band Third Eye Blind taunts Republicans at concert during RNC“You can boo all you want, but I’m the [expletive] artist up here,” the band’s lead singer told the crowd.


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Flag-burning near RNC spurs clashes, arrests

Clashes outside the GOP convention. (AP)Tensions flare and police move in as protesters and counterprotesters skirmish over a burned flag.


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Sweltering 'heat dome' smothers central U.S.

A construction worker carries rebar through a luxury apartment site during the heat of the day, Wednesday, July 20, 2016, in Chicago. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration urged employers to protect laborers doing construction, road and agricultural work, as high temperatures and humidity will affect the central United States this week, sending heat indexes as high as 115 degrees in some places for the first time this year. (AP Photo/Tae-Gyun Kim)High temperatures and humidity will bake residents in a large swath of the nation, making it feel as hot as 115 degrees to some.


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Clinton’s VP search focuses on 3 candidates

Sen. Tim Kaine, left, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack, center, and Labor Secretary Tom Perez are considered the top contenders to be Hillary Clinton’s VP choice. (AP)The main contenders to be her running mate include two Cabinet members and a senator, sources say.


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A Trump presidency may not deter Cruz in 2020

Ted Cruz (Cliff Owen/AP)He's reportedly open to making the first major challenge of an incumbent president from his own party since 1980.


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Push to register 1 million U.S. Muslim voters

Push to register 1 million U.S. Muslim voters. (Getty Images)Community leaders are driven by what they say is an anti-Muslim stance taken by GOP nominee Donald Trump.


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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Sat, 23 Jul 2016 09:02:56 -0400

White supremacists energized by Trump

David Duke (ABC News)Former KKK grand wizard David Duke announces a bid for the Senate and likens his immigration policy to Trump's.


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Herald Sun | Top Stories
last updated: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 09:41:00 GMT

Response from Eddie, AFL not nearly enough
THERE'S so much wrong about the Eddie McGuire-James-Brayshaw-Danny Frawley pack mentality attack of Caroline Wilson. As was the AFL's insipid response on Monday.

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Secret tape not the only talking point
THE reasons behind a decision to release a secret expletive-laden recording of former Chief Justice Tim Carmody are almost as juicy as the tape is expected to be.

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Digg Top Stories
last updated: Sat, 23 Jul 2016 20:01:36 +0000

'My Daughter Came Out. They Handed Her To Me. She Was Dead'
It is a decision that no parent should have to make: should we let our very sick baby die before she was born?

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Turkish president gains upper hand in power struggle
ISTANBUL (Reuters) - At the crossroads between a divided Europe and a convulsed Middle East, Turkey is caught in a power struggle between former Islamist allies which is shaking democratic institutions and raises questions about its future path.

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BuzzFeed Index - Latest
last updated: Sat, 23 Jul 2016 19:16:04 -0400

Getting Rid Of Clothes I Hated Helped Me Love My Body

It can really be that simple.

Charlotte Gomez / Jon Premosch / BuzzFeed

I am also, today, the healthiest and happiest I've ever been. This is because four years ago was the last time I engaged in any of the many eating disorder behaviors I'd developed from the ages of 15 to 26. I spent those 11 years obsessing over my eating and my body, in cycles of dieting, then restricting, then bingeing, then purging. I was never, ever at the weight I wanted to be, and the weight I wanted to be seemed to promise so much: Carefree living! No problems whatsoever! Success in work and relationships! If only I could just lose, like, five more pounds!

1. Whenever I reached a goal weight, I quickly discovered I still hated my body and decided I just needed to adjust the goal number.
2. It wasn't until I stopped fixating on an impossibly low goal weight (and started gaining weight) that I found myself in a relationship, job, and life that I love. Am I saying everyone needs to gain weight to achieve their dreams? Well, no. But you know what does help? Eating, and opening up space in your brain to think about other things.

It turns out a lifelong belief in the idea that thinness = beauty = happiness is a tough one to kick.


View Entire List ›

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TIME
last updated:

Why Germany—and the World—Is Arguing Over the Munich Shooter
The motivation of the man who killed 9 people in Munich is still up for debate

Hubertus Andrae, the Munich chief of police, shook his head and let out a sigh when asked about the gunman’s politics. Not even a day had passed since a shooting rampage on his patch of southern Germany had left nine people dead, most of them teenagers. But the chief already felt confident enough in the investigation to dismiss any links to Islamic extremism. The young killer, a dual citizen of Germany and Iran who was born and raised in Munich, had an “obsession” with indiscriminate violence, Andrae said, and apparently decided to “run amok” outside the city’s biggest shopping mall.

Still, it seemed a bit early to call the case closed. When we spoke at police headquarters on Saturday afternoon, the chief conceded that his officers had not yet analyzed all the gunman’s computers and social media accounts. Nor had investigators been able to question all the witnesses of the rampage, one of whom told CNN that the gunman shouted Allahu Akbar – “God is great” – while firing his Glock into a crowd of people near a McDonald’s restaurant. Pressed on this point, Andrae was dismissive. “Even if he would have said this, it would not automatically indicate anything,” he told me. “Not everyone who uses this saying, which is now famous around the world, is automatically linked to ISIS.”

Read More: Munich Attacker ‘Obsessed’ With Mass Shootings

Clearly not. That phrase is an everyday expression of faith for many of the world’s 1.6 billion Muslims. But shouting it during a shooting spree is also a hallmark of Islamist violence, one of the few reliable signs that investigators have at a time when the very idea of what is terrorism and what is crime has become increasingly hard to pin down. That is the reality ISIS has helped create. In their propaganda, the group’s leaders have been happy to claim responsibility for any atrocity their death cult inspires, even when the perpetrator has had no discernible ties to the group other than the vague and virtual relationship often referred to as “self-radicalization.”

Germanyhas learned that lesson. On July 18, a young Muslim asylum seeker armed with an ax and a knife attacked a group of passengers on a train in the town of Würzburg, leaving five people gravely injured. In a video posted online, that attacker had pledged allegiance to ISIS, which in turn took responsibility for the bloodshed he caused, calling the 17-year-old axman a “soldier” of its self-declared caliphate. At least on an ideological level, the link to ISIS seemed as plain as it could be.

Read More: 80 Killed in ISIS Attack on Afghan Protest

But in that case, too, German authorities were careful not to draw too clear a line between the perpetrator and any kind of Islamic extremism. Even after confirming the authenticity of the Würzburg attacker’s suicide video—in which he pledges allegiance to ISIS and vows to kill “non-believers”—Germany’s top police official would not qualify the attack as an act of terrorism. “It is in a grey area between a rampage and terrorism,” said Interior Minister Thomas de Maizière, using the German term Amoklauf—literally, “running amok”—itself a borrow from a Malay word, which normally refers to mass shootings and other attacks with no clear political motive.

There could be many reasons for this abundance of caution on the part of German authorities. For one thing, they may not want to play into the hands of ISIS, which has sought to convince the world that its reach is limitless exactly because it can inspire attacks without explicitly directing them. “We tend to focus on their messianic vision of killing the infidels, but in reality ISIS leaders are students of geopolitics,” says Michael Weiss, co-author of ISIS: Inside the Army of Terror. “The logic is dialectical: encourage or ‘inspire’ jihadi attacks; precipitate anti-Muslim backlash (which can take the form of simply everyone assuming that a mass shooting must be Islamist, even when it isn’t) and wait for the West to cannibalize itself.”

Read More: Why Germany Can’t Figure Out the Identity of Its First ISIS Attacker

That is exactly what Germany has been keen to avoid, especially in the wake of such shocks to the Western order as the British vote to leave the European Union last month. The day after the shootings in Munich, a senior member of Chancellor Angela Merkel’s party, the Christian Democratic Union, said the nation’s priority in the wake of the latest attack should be to stamp out hate speech, or as he put it, to avoid the “brutalization of language.”

“Regardless of what his motives or his personal disposition,” Volker Kauder, the head of the party’s parliamentary faction, wrote in a statement on the Munich shootings, “we have to pay even more attention to the fact that hatred and violence generally does not continue to spread in our society.”

But that focus on maintaining social harmony—rather than identifying criminal motives—has fueled a different sort of hostility. It has allowed the right-wing to accuse the establishment of whitewashing the facts of the case. On the evening of July 23, the U.S. news website Breitbart, which takes a hard line against immigration in general and the encroachments of Islam into Western society in particular, accused the BBC of attempting “to scrub any Muslim or Islamic heritage link to its coverage of the incident.”

The evidence seemed weak at best. While many media outlets in Germany and abroad identified the Munich shooter with the vaguely Arabic-sounding name Ali David Sonboly, the BBC referred to him in a tweet and other coverage as David Sonboly. “The BBC has gone to extraordinary lengths to try to keep any reference to his heritage out of its coverage,” Breitbart wrote, suggesting that this was all part of a mainstream conspiracy to brush aside any religious motives in the attack. (BBC has so far declined to comment. On its website, it names the attacker “Ali David Sonboly, or David S.”)

In Germany, the radical right has taken the conspiracy theory even further. One of the leaders of the anti-Islamic movement known as PEGIDA, which stands for “Patriotic European Against the Islamization of the West,” accused the German government and media of ignoring the “obvious” fact that the Munich shooting was an act of religious extremism. “The whole thing stinks to high heaven,” Tatjana Festerling, who has recently founded a new, pan-European movement against Islamic immigration, wrote on her Facebook page.

In reality, there seemed to be nothing obvious about the Munich shooters supposed links to Islamic radicalism. Even before the Munich police chief briefed reporters on the investigation Saturday afternoon, it seemed clear that the gunman was not a typical jihadi. For one thing, he ended his rampage by killing himself, which is forbidden under Islamic law. For another, his family hails from Iran, a Shiite Muslim nation that has been fighting the Sunni militants of ISIS ever since they declared their caliphate two years ago. A video posted online also appeared to show the gunman shouting “I am German!” during his rampage – hardly the slogan of a would-be mujahid.

These early indications seemed to square with what police found in the gunman’s apartment in the early hours of Saturday morning. Nowhere among his possessions did investigators uncover any Islamist literature, Chief Andrae said. Instead, they found a collection of books and articles about mass shootings, including the German edition of a book titled, “Why Kids Kill: Inside the Minds of School Shooters.” They also found signs that the gunman may have been inspired by Anders Behring Breivik, the right-wing radical who murdered 77 people in Norway during a gun and bomb attack in 2011. The Munich shooting took place on the fifth anniversary of those attacks, and for Chief Andrae, the connection between the two incidents seemed “obvious,” he said.

At least politically, this may have come as a relief for Chancellor Merkel and her government. Since the arrival last year of more than a million asylum seekers from the Muslim world—and especially since one of those asylum seekers went berserk last week on a train in Würzburg—Merkel has faced intense criticism for allowing so many foreigners to enter the country without much vetting.

Two Islamist rampages in the course of a week would not have helped Merkel to calm such criticism. So in the wake of the stabbings in Würzburg, her government tried to play down the fact that the attacker was a refugee. “You cannot say there is no connection between refugees and terrorism,”conceded de Maizière, the interior minister. “But the danger was high before and remains high, regardless of questions about refugees.” Though he is not a politician, the Munich police chief also took pains to point out that Friday’s gun massacre “had nothing to do with the refugee issue.”

This was obviously true: The gunman in Munich was born and raised in Germany. But was it equally obvious that he had no Islamist sympathies of any kind? Are police sure, for example, that he did not shout “Allahu Akbar” while gunning down innocent people? “That we don’t know,” the police chief told me. “We would need actual facts and background information to know the mindset, the demeanor of the person.” This early in the investigation, perhaps it would have been better to leave the preliminary conclusions at that.

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