Yahoo News - Top Stories
last updated: Mon, 06 Jul 2015 07:01:13 -0400

Greeks vote 'No' - What now? LIVE REPORT

People celebrate in Athens on July 5, 2015 after the exit-polls of the Greek referendum showed over 60% of Greeks rejected further austerity dictated by the country's EU-IMF creditors in a referendum* Greece's flamboyant Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis has resigned, in a move seen as a concession to creditors irked by his sometimes erratic approach to negotiations. * Greece is fast running out of cash, with restrictions on bank withdrawals, the economy in deep freeze and its banking sector propped by a European Central Bank lifeline. * The ECB has pledged to keep Greek banks solvent for now, but it is unclear how long that will last.


full story

15 Most Stressful Jobs in the World

Everyone has a bad day at work now and then. But if you have one of these 15 Most Stressful Jobs in the World, even one bad day can get you or someone else killed. From EMT to Coal Miner to Ice Road Trucker, these are the jobs that will keep you up at nights!


full story

Herald Sun | Breaking News
last updated: Mon, 06 Jul 2015 09:37:11 GMT

Rinehart talks about her father, family
THE late Lang Hancock kept working to try to become an iron ore mine owner after discovering massive deposits in the Pilbara, daughter Gina Rinehart says.

full story

Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Sun, 05 Jul 2015 22:40:25 -0400

Germany: No basis now for new debt talks with Greece

EU flag flying over the German parliament is reflected on a building in Berlin, on July 6, 2015Germany continues to talk tough after Greece rejected creditors' austerity demands in a referendum.


full story

More than 1 million expected at pope's Mass in South America

Pope Francis laughs as he meets the journalists aboard the papal airplane on the occasion of his visit to Quito, Ecuador, July 5, 2015. The Pontiff is visiting Ecuador, Bolivia and Paraguay during his Apostolic trip from July 5 to July 12. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)QUITO, Ecuador (AP) — Pope Francis travels to the Ecuadorean port of Guayaquil on Monday for a Mass expected to draw more than a million people, as Latin America's first pontiff tours his home continent with a message of compassion for the weak and respect for an ailing planet.


full story

Captured New York fugitive moved to prison from hospital

A wanted poster for escaped convict David Sweat is seen in a handout released by the New York State PoliceCaptured prison escapee David Sweat was released on Sunday from a New York hospital where he had been treated for gunshot wounds and moved to a prison more than 250 miles from the one he fled, authorities said. Sweat, captured last Sunday following a three-week manhunt, will be locked up alone in a cell for 23 hours a day and placed on suicide watch at Five Points Correctional Facility in Romulus, in the state's Finger Lakes region, the Department of Corrections and Community Supervision said. Sweat, 35, and accomplice Richard Matt escaped from maximum security Clinton Correctional Facility in Dannemora, New York on June 6.


full story

Maine man dies after trying to light firework on his head
Devon Staples, 22, of Calais, Maine, was drinking and celebrating the holiday in a friend's backyard when he placed the fireworks mortar tube on his head around 10 p.m., said Stephen McCausland, a spokesman for the state Department of Public Safety. McCausland said it was unclear whether the firework was already lit, or whether Staples lit it once it was on his head. The tube Staples was using was a reusable mortar shell but said McCausland said investigators did not know what type of firework he was attempting to shoot.

full story

Burt's Bees cofounder Burt Shavitz dead at 80
Shavitz, a "a wild-bearded and free-spirited Maine man" and beekeeper, co-founded the company with artist Roxanne Quimby in 1984, the company said in a statement. "It is with broken hearts that we must convey the saddest news: Burt Shavitz, our co-founder and namesake, has left for greener fields and wilder woods," the company said in a statement on Facebook. A company spokeswoman told USA Today that Shavitz died of respiratory issues on Sunday surrounded by family and friends in Bangor, Maine.

full story

Greece enters uncharted territory after referendum 'no' vote

A supporter of the No vote waves a Greek flag in front of the parliament after the results of the referendum at Syntagma square in Athens, Sunday, July 5, 2015. Greeks overwhelmingly rejected creditors' demands for more austerity in return for rescue loans in a critical referendum Sunday, backing Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras, who insisted the vote would give him a stronger hand to reach a better deal. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)The country's future in Europe's common currency is now uncertain.


full story

U.S. women beat Japan 5-2 for World Cup title

Team USA captures FIFA Women's World Cup in 5-2 rout of JapanCarli Lloyd.scored three times in the first half to vault the Americans to their third Women's World Cup title on Sunday with a 5-2 victory over Japan at B.C. Place.


full story

Fans cheer as Princess Charlotte christened on royal estate

Britain's Prince William, Kate the Duchess of Cambridge, their son Prince George and daughter Princess Charlotte in a pram arrive for Charlotte's Christening at St. Mary Magdalene Church in Sandringham, England, Sunday, July 5, 2015. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, Pool)LONDON (AP) — Prince William and his wife, Kate, marked a milestone for their newborn baby Princess Charlotte on Sunday — a christening ceremony on Queen Elizabeth II's country estate that was steeped in royal tradition.


full story

A family divided: Emotions run high as Greeks vote

Dimitra Danikoglou, 48, gestures as she talks next to her son Nikolas, 23, at their apartment in Athens, Saturday, July 4, 2015. Meet the Danikoglous, a typically intense, articulate Greek family divided over how best to cope with Greece’s careening financial crisis, which may lead to a break with the eurozone and the European Union if voters Sunday say “no” to a proposed bailout plan that would impose still more years of austerity on an already crushed Greek economy. They are united in their belief that only as a strong family can they weather the coming storm. And they share a sense that Greece, so rich with history and culture, has fallen tragically short of its potential. (AP Photo/Spyros Tsakiris)ATHENS, Greece (AP) — Dimitris is voting "yes" because he fears Greece would be in danger if it leaves the European Union. His daughter Alexandra is voting "no" because she is tired of richer European nations bossing Greece around.


full story

Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Sun, 05 Jul 2015 22:47:37 -0400

Germany: No basis now for new debt talks with Greece

EU flag flying over the German parliament is reflected on a building in Berlin, on July 6, 2015Germany continues to talk tough after Greece rejected creditors' austerity demands in a referendum.


full story

Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Sun, 05 Jul 2015 21:16:30 -0400

Germany: No basis now for new debt talks with Greece

EU flag flying over the German parliament is reflected on a building in Berlin, on July 6, 2015Germany continues to talk tough after Greece rejected creditors' austerity demands in a referendum.


full story

Herald Sun | Top Stories
last updated: Mon, 06 Jul 2015 09:03:00 GMT

Europe holds its breath for Grexit
EVERYONE is waiting to see what will happen next after Greeks made it clear they didn’t want to be answerable to the ­“demands” of EU creditors.

full story

Why 60 Minutes didn’t approach Smith
THE executive producer of 60 Minutes has revealed why Cameron Smith wasn’t approached to respond to Alex McKinnon’s emotional criticism.

full story

Digg Top Stories
last updated: Sun, 05 Jul 2015 23:22:39 +0000

The Grateful Dead's Wall Of Sound
The untold story of the Grateful Dead's short-lived mega PA, arguably the largest, most technologically innovative sound system ever built.

full story

Reuters: Top News
last updated: Sun, 05 Jul 2015 16:02:09 GMT

China downplays Hillary Clinton claim it hacked U.S. information
BEIJING (Reuters) - China on Monday downplayed an accusation by U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton that Beijing had tried to "hack into everything that doesn't move in America".

full story

BuzzFeed Index - Latest
last updated: Mon, 06 Jul 2015 00:07:06 -0400

The 30 Craziest Complaints Teachers Have Had From Parents

“I don’t do homework, so why should my son?”

I met so many brilliant people when I was a teacher, particularly my dedicated colleagues and students. And the parents - the vast majority were supportive and great. Then there were the others. Like the dad who got hold of my mobile number and used to call me several times a week after school to ask if I could walk around the building and see if his son was still there. And that was tame, I discovered, when I spoke to teachers about the most ludicrous complaints and requests they have received from people old enough to know better.

1.

1.

Getty Images / BuzzFeed

2. "This history is from too long ago. When are they going to do the history of now?"

3. "You're too Welsh."

4. "He can't come to revision, he has to go to the gym because he's fat."

5. "I don't do homework, so why should my son?"

6.

6.

Getty Images / BuzzFeed


View Entire List ›

full story

TIME
last updated:

Read a Hemingway-Era Account of the Running of the Bulls
"[In] in the second week of July, Pamplona becomes bull-mad"

The festival of San Fermin has been held in Pamplona, Spain, for centuries and the annual event is still the area’s claim to fame. Of the many components of the days-long event, which begins on Monday this year, the running of the bulls (which starts Tuesday) is the most famous part—and, thanks to Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises, the early 20th century is perhaps its most famous era.

The novel concerns—as TIME phrased it in the original 1926 book review—the”semi-humorous love tragedy of an insatiable young English War widow and an unmanned U. S. soldier” and takes place in “prizefights, bars, bedrooms, [and] bullrings in France and Spain.”

In 1932, TIME covered the running (or, rather, “driving”) of the bulls. Though the magazine didn’t employ Hemingway’s terse declarations or calculated repetition, it painted a picture of the world that inspired the author’s story:

For 51 weeks of the year the capital of Navarra is a sleepy little Spanish city where half-naked children play in the narrow streets and café waiters doze under the arcades of the broad, quiet Plaza de la Constitucíon. But in the second week of July, Pamplona becomes bull-mad, its streets and plaza are full of snuffing, rushing bulls. Hotels and rooming houses overflow with visitors from Madrid, Bilbao, San Sebastian, with tourists from St. Jean-de-Luz, Biarritz and Paris. Peasants from miles around sleep in wagons, in the fields, or do not sleep at all. For four days from 6 a. m. until long after midnight sleep is next to impossible while Pamplona celebrates the Fiesta of San Fermín, its patron saint. There are bullfights, street dancing, parades of huge grotesque figures, much drinking of strong Spanish wine. But by far the most exciting ceremony—one which takes place only at Pamplona—is the encierro (driving of the bulls).

Soon after dawn the first day of the fiesta this week, hundreds of youths gathered at the edge of town near the railroad station. Men climbed upon six big cages, reached down and opened them. Out walked six bulls, blinking in the sunlight. They were strong, lithe, handsome, each branded with the mark of Don Ernesto Blanco. They looked around, uncertain what to do, until from the crowd of youths came a yell: “Hah! Hah! . . . Toro!” The bulls lowered their heads, charged the crowd. The crowd took to its heels, the bulls stampeding in pursuit.

Read the full story, here in the TIME Vault: Pamplona’s Encierros

full story