Reuters: Technology News
last updated: Mon, 11 Dec 2017 02:45:18 -0500

Hotly anticipated bitcoin futures surge 21 percent on debut
NEW YORK/SYDNEY (Reuters) - Bitcoin futures jumped more than 20 percent in their eagerly anticipated U.S. debut, which backers hope will encourage wider use and legitimacy for the world's largest cryptocurrency even as critics warn of the risk of a bubble and price collapse.

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BBC News - Technology
last updated: Sat, 09 Dec 2017 09:37:43 GMT

German spy agency warns of Chinese LinkedIn espionage
Germany's spy agency says China is using the site to gather information on politicians.

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Geek.com
last updated: Fri, 08 Dec 2017 22:15:12 +0000

John Cho Terrifies and Traumatizes While Tomas is Tempted on The Exorcist

After last night, there’s only one episode left in this season of The Exoricst and things are at their darkest. Remember this time last season? Angela Rance/Regan MacNeil had fully integrated with the demon. Marcus […]

The post John Cho Terrifies and Traumatizes While Tomas is Tempted on The Exorcist appeared first on Geek.com.

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PC World - News RSS feed
last updated: Thu, 04 May 2017 03:28:00 +1000

Sneaky Gmail phishing attack fools with fake Google Docs app
Google Docs was pulled into a sneaky email phishing attack on Tuesday that was designed to trick users into giving up access to their Gmail accounts.

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Now Slack search can look for knowledgeable users and channels
How do you find someone in an organization who can answer a burning question? That’s what Slack is trying to answer with an update to its search feature that was released for larger teams on Wednesday.

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China will attempt to keep IT products spy-free with security checks
China will start carrying out security checks for IT vendors in the country that intend to keep out internet and networking services vulnerable to spying and hacking risks.

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Intel's new data centre chief, a former PC exec, will be hands-on
A top executive responsible for shaping Intel's PC roadmap will now run the company's data center business.

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Anker's insanely popular SoundCore Bluetooth speaker is just $29 right now
This well-regarded Bluetooth speaker is currently available for an even better price than usual.

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Apple's next iPhones may cut corners on memory due to price squeeze
Apple could cut the capacity of DRAM in its upcoming anniversary iPhones with the rising prices of storage and memory components hitting its profit margins.

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How to size up a new cloud service like low-priced Wasabi
Saving money may be a good enough reason to try a brand-new cloud storage service -- if it can deliver on its promises. That's the equation some enterprises may use when they look at Wasabi Technologies, an object storage startup that says it offers six times the performance of Amazon's S3 service at one-fifth the price.

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Verizon sells its cloud and managed hosting services to IBM
Verizon shut down its public cloud service in early 2016, and now it's unloading its virtual private cloud and managed hosting services to IBM.

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Google echoes Amazon's assurance on EU data protection compliance
Google has joined Amazon Web Services in promising customers of its cloud services that it will be compliant with new European Union data protection rules due to take effect next year.

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Microsoft's Surface Arc Mouse quietly launches alongside the Surface Laptop
The popular Arc Mouse is joining the Surface family in June, alongside Microsoft's Surface Laptop.

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Micron's SolidScale system pushes SSDs out to shared storage
SSDs operate the fastest when inside a computer. Micron's new SolidScale storage system uproots SSDs from servers and pushes them into discrete boxes while reducing latency.

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Windows 10 S laptops won't let you switch from Edge or Bing
Windows 10 S makes Edge and Bing your default browser and search engine—and they can't be changed.

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Xen hypervisor faces third highly critical VM escape bug in 10 months
The Xen Project has fixed three vulnerabilities in its widely used hypervisor that could allow operating systems running inside virtual machines to access the memory of the host systems, breaking the critical security layer between them.

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Meet the Latitude 11 EDU, Dell's Windows 10 S answer to the Chromebook
Dell's Latitude 11 EDU is one of the low-cost Windows 10 S laptops designed to help Microsoft's take back the classroom from Chromebooks.

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Groupe PSA, NuTonomy team to test fully automated Peugeot 3008s
NuTonomy, a developer of software for self-driving cars, has teamed with Groupe PSA to integrate its software, along with sensors and computing platforms, into fully autonomous Peugeot 3008 sport utility vehicles that have been customized by the French car maker for the purpose.

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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Mon, 11 Sep 2017 13:13:35 -0400

Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial Slur

Mother Angry After School's Robocall Keeps Mispronouncing Daughter's Name As A Racial SlurNicomi Stewart, a mother in Rochester, New York, is “disgusted” after an automated call sent to her phone from the city’s school district mispronounced her daughter’s name as a racial slur.


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Galaxies collide in stunning picture
A NEW image captured by NASA Hubble space telescope shows ‘doomed duo’ galaxies colliding and then trying to destroy one another.

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CNET News
last updated: Sun, 10 Dec 2017 18:50:05 +0000

Elusive Tesla semi truck spotted taking a cruise - Roadshow
A visitor to Tesla's design facility in California captured rare footage of Elon Musk's latest toy for truckers in the wild.

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BuzzFeed - Geeky
last updated: Tue, 10 Oct 2017 11:46:04 -0400

This Yes Or No Quiz Determines If You're A Star Trek Fan

Let’s see how much of this franchise you’ve binged.

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Tech – TIME
last updated:

Facebook Just Published Its Sexual Harassment Policy. Here’s Why
The tech firm says the move will help smaller companies and put pressure on their peers

Heidi Swartz, Facebook’s head of employment law, likes to use the example of a senior employee inviting a junior employee up to his hotel room — after he has told her that he will be providing feedback on her job performance. Perhaps he isn’t her direct manager. Perhaps he truly wants to show her the view. That’s the kind of scenario that employees might hear at a training. “Everybody relates to examples,” Swartz says.

The power of example is also the reason that Facebook published the company’s policies on sexual harassment and bullying on Friday, along with information about how complaints are investigated when they arise. (And, at a company with 23,165 employees, they do arise, though Facebook isn’t sharing numbers.) “We don’t think our policy is necessarily the best one out there,” Swartz says. “We’re hoping to start a discussion.”

Facebook is doing this partly to help smaller companies, which might not be able to afford a bevy of in-house employment lawyers and could use a model for setting up their own policies. In dissections of Silicon Valley’s problems with inclusion — especially regarding women — critics often point to the fact that startups will ignore unsexy things like writing up workplace policies until they’re “hiring an HR person to get out of trouble,” as one exec put it. Founders are strapped for cash, under pressure to grow fast, and end up playing catchup.

Women in tech have repeatedly called out cultures that permit inappropriate and sexist behavior in the workplace. The story of former Uber employee Susan Fowler, who detailed how she was sexually propositioned and discriminated against at the company, is a high-profile example of widespread issues. In one informal survey, 60% of women who work in tech reported dealing with unwanted sexual advances. Of those, 65% said those advances had come from a superior. And nearly 40% said they did not report harassment because they feared it would have a negative impact on their careers.

Swartz says that Facebook is also sharing this policy with hopes that “peers” will follow suit, so everyone can compare notes and do a better job of avoiding “the kinds of things we’re reading about.” Companies are often guarded about nitty-gritty workplace details, which is why it wasn’t that long ago that the biggest names in tech were fighting to keep the demographics of their workforce a secret. Executives might fear that sharing information will have unforeseen legal implications. Businesses might consider their policies proprietary, Swartz says, or be loathe to publish something that will inevitably require updating. California, for instance, recently approved new employment regulations regarding gender expression, requiring all the businesses in the state to take a fresh look at their guidelines.

Facebook, in Silicon Valley fashion, is taking the position that more opportunities for feedback will lead to a better understanding of flaws in the system and, therefore, improvement. “We can all talk about how we can do better,” Swartz says.

The same logic helped drive companies to follow Google’s lead after the company first publicly shared data about the diversity of its workforce in 2014. Just a few years later, its become an annual rite for that firm, as well as Facebook and Twitter and other players who have vowed to be more inclusive of women and people of color. In the wake of Fowler’s expose and other workplace problems, Uber also released its first report earlier this year, joining those who have sought edification through transparency.

By trying to start a trend, Facebook is sending a message to those inside and outside the company that this issue is taken seriously in Menlo Park (and stands to have its reputation benefit from the optics of that seriousness, too). Swartz says that behavior need not be illegal to run afoul of the company guidelines: While “one or two comments” might not amount to sexual harassment in a courtroom, because laws often require that behavior is pervasive, it could lead to losing a job with them, she says.

On Dec. 3, Sheryl Sandberg wrote a post on Facebook that, in hindsight, foreshadowed this release. She recalled times when she had been harassed in her career — including an incident when a man banged on her hotel door until she called security — and she emphasized that this cultural reckoning cannot end with people sharing their stories. “We need systemic, lasting changes that deter bad behavior and protect everyone,” Sandberg wrote. “Too many workplaces lack clear policies about how to handle accusations of sexual harassment.”

It’s not a simple thing to do. There are fears of retaliation and fears of stigma. Situations can boil down to one person’s word against another. Swartz says processes must be clear and fair: No one should be considered guilty until proven innocent, nor innocent until proven guilty. There must be a regular process used to gather the facts by impartial people. Individuals must be able to be anonymous at times, yet always accountable. And while some infractions, like groping, clearly cross a line, it can be hard to know when more subtle behavior is worthy of filing a report. (For her part, Swartz says she rather have employees raise the issue, because at the very least someone is going to learn something.)

There’s no question that it is complicated and challenging to get this right. We are by no means perfect, and there will always be bad actors,” Sandberg and Lori Goler, head of HR at Facebook, wrote in a joint post about publishing the policies. “What we can do is be as transparent as possible, share best practices, and learn from one another — recognizing that policies will evolve as we gain experience.”

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Twitter / liamalexander
last updated: Mon, 08 Oct 2012 07:22:42 +0000

liamalexander: My daily stats: 12 new followers, 9 new unfollowers via http://t.co/hROlspGI
liamalexander: My daily stats: 12 new followers, 9 new unfollowers via http://t.co/hROlspGI

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Twitter / Favorites from liamalexander
last updated: Mon, 25 Apr 2011 22:44:57 +0000

alanjonesUK: RT @PopSci: Scientists finally have some answers about the mysterious "dark matter" in the human genome: http://t.co/Gm4Fh0B6
alanjonesUK: RT @PopSci: Scientists finally have some answers about the mysterious "dark matter" in the human genome: http://t.co/Gm4Fh0B6

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Ask the Guru
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Captain marketing phone number - We are a SEO, SEM, and online advertising firm based in Los Angeles. Our experts specialize in search engine optimization, Intern

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Stumble
last updated: Fri, 25 Feb 2011 22:09:20 +0000
The Next Web
last updated:

Bitcoin heads to Wall Street as CBOE launches futures

Bitcoin finally arrived on Wall Street with the launch of the Chicago Board Options Exchange’s (CBOE) futures for the cryptocurrency on Sunday. Within hours of the exchange kicking off trading for Bitcoin futures at 6PM ET, they soared by 25 percent – triggering a five-minute trading halt that’s similar to a pause in trading stocks when prices rise or fall drastically. The launch also caused CBOE’s site to crash, due to a massive surge in traffic. Things soon returned to normal, and trading of the new futures, which use the XBT ticker symbol, continued. Due to heavy traffic on our…

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