Reuters: Technology News
last updated: Fri, 21 Jul 2017 18:51:24 -0400

Madrid asks anti-trust watchdog to probe Uber's new airport service
MADRID (Reuters) - Authorities in Madrid asked Spain's anti-trust watchdog on Saturday to investigate whether Uber's new low-cost airport transfer service constitutes unfair competition.

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BBC News - Technology
last updated: Fri, 21 Jul 2017 23:14:30 GMT

YouTube to redirect searches for IS videos
People looking for extremist Islamist propaganda will be shown clips denouncing terrorism instead.

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UK to bring in drone registration
Drone owners will also be required to pass a safety awareness test.

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C-Turtle: The landmine-detecting robot 'turtle'
The disposable robot is made from cardboard and powered by a Raspberry Pi Zero computer.

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AI demo picks out recipes from food photos
Researchers in the US develop an algorithm that appears to have a penchant for desserts

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MoneySuperMarket fined for sending seven million unwanted emails
The price comparison website sent seven million emails to people who had opted out of receiving messages.

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Kodi magazine 'directs readers to pirate content'
The guide is being investigated by the Federation Against Copyright Theft.

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AlphaBay and Hansa dark web markets shut down
The AlphaBay and Hansa marketplaces were known for trade in drugs, weapons and malware.

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Newcastle University students targeted by cyber-scam
Fraudulent site takes personal details and course payments for fake university.

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Robot 'drowns' in fountain mishap
The wheeled security robot in Washington DC tumbled into a fountain at an office building.

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Bitcoin swings as civil war looms
The Bitcoin community must agree how to tackle a slowdown in transaction times to avoid a schism.

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Google Maps adds the International Space Station
The International Space Station becomes the first "off planet" addition to the interactive tool.

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OnePlus admits emergency 911 call glitch
Its flagship OnePlus 5 phone would restart if people tried to call the emergency services.

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Dark net guns shipped in old printers
A study into the sale of firearms on the dark net finds "cause for concern" for police and government.

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Meet Rob Spence, the film-maker with the camera eye
Film-maker Rob Spence used his bionic eye to record a mini documentary about cyborgs.

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Google to add 'news feed' to website and app
A Facebook-style feed of news stories and videos will be rolled out across Google's services.

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Laptop ban: US lifts restrictions on Saudi Arabian flights
Saudi Arabian Airlines says US authorities have lifted restrictions on laptops in cabins at two airports.

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Instagram tops cyber-bullying study
Seven per cent of young social media users said they had been bullied on the photo-themed app.

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Google Glass smart eyewear returns
A revamped version of the technology company's augmented-reality eyewear is to be sold by software partners.

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Virgin complaint bans Sky broadband ad
The advert claimed Sky broadband was "super reliable", which the Advertising Standards Authority disputed.

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Is WhatsApp being censored in China?
The messaging service has faced service disruptions, but it censorship, or is there another explanation?

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Petya cyber-attack still disrupting firms weeks later
Some businesses hit by the Petya cyber-attack have not yet returned to normal operations.

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Ori's robotic furniture zooms across apartment
A robotics start-up creates voice-controlled furniture that moves to maximise space in small flats.

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Newcastle City Council admits adoption data leak
The leaked information includes names of current and former adoptees, parents and social workers

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Hacks 'probably compromised' UK industry
The analysis was made by GCHQ, according to a document seen by technology website Motherboard.

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Openreach mulls full fibre rollout for 10 million in UK
Openreach, newly split from BT, is considering faster fibre services but wants help from industry.

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Porn ID checks set to start in April 2018
The government sets a nine-month countdown to porn ID checks, but is told this seems "unrealistic".

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Japan's zero-gravity space drone sends first pictures from ISS
Life on the International Space Station has been photographed by an impossibly cute drone from Japan.

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Netflix now has 104 million subscribers worldwide
Shares in the video streaming firm surge in after-hours trading on better-than-expected results.

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Drone 'threat' to planes over Israel
A man is arrested on suspicion of flying a consumer drone close to planes preparing to land in Tel Aviv.

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HTC backlash over pop-up ads on keyboard
The phone maker says the pop-ups have been seen because of an "error" to the annoyance of users.

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Facebook refuses Pakistan's ID demands
The government wanted changes to help it track the creators of blasphemous posts.

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Ashley Madison offers $11m settlement
The company behind the hacked infidelity website is hoping to settle a number of class actions.

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Telegram to block terror channels after Indonesian ban
Telegram promises to move quicker on radical content after Indonesia briefly shuts it down.

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Emojis honoured in world celebration
New York's Empire State Building will be lit up in yellow for World Emoji Day.

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Inside the cyber-attack on UK parliament
The inside story of the day hackers attacked parliament - and how the security team fought back.

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Pleasurewood Hills rollercoaster rescue
A man stuck on the Wipeout ride had to be rescued by firefighters.

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Australian PM seeks access to encrypted messages
The country's leader says the internet cannot be a "dark place" for criminals to communicate.

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DeepMind AI is learning to walk and other tech news
BBC Click’s Marc Cieslak looks at some of the best of the week's technology news stories.

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Luxury phone-maker Vertu collapses
The British-based company will be liquidated, resulting in the loss of nearly 200 jobs.

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Judge rules pacemaker data admissible in court
A man charged with aggravated arson is set to have his pacemaker data used in evidence against him.

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Bupa data breach affects 500,000 insurance customers
An employee copied and removed customer information on international insurance plans, Bupa says.

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DraftKings and FanDuel abandon fantasy sports merger
US government officials said in June the deal raised concerns about competition and they would try to block it.

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EU clamps down on social media job snoops
Employers should have legal grounds to conduct social media searches on job applicants, says EU group.

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3D-printed drone's space station pictures and other news
BBC Click’s Nick Kwek looks at some of the best of the week's technology news stories.

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Robot rower built for Cambridge University project
Research students from Peterhouse College in Cambridge build a 'row-bot' to mimic the actions of a college rower.

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WhatsApp video messages 'blocked' in China
Chinese authorities also appear to have stopped users sending photos and voice messages.

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Would using an eye scanner make mobile banking secure?
TSB customers will be able to try out iris scanning technology to access their bank account.

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Hands-on with the sci-fi shooter Destiny 2 Beta
A pre-release online beta where fans can experience how the new game plays has been released.

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Fake Obama created using AI tool to make phoney speeches
The tool that can edit videos of people speaking and make them say something they have not.

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Bermuda shipwreck digitally recreated by divers
The seas around Bermuda have more shipwrecks per mile than any other place on Earth.

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'Cyber-insurance cost to double'
Inga Beale says the threat of cyber-attacks is 'really alive for businesses'

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Living dragonfly drones take flight
Researchers hope to use the insect to get to areas larger drones cannot reach.

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The house being built by robots and 3D printers
A three-storey house is being designed, planned and built predominately by robots and 3D printers.

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Driving a car made from biodegradable materials
The four-seater car is made from sugar beet, coated with flax and mixed with bio-plastic.

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3D-printed structures change shape when heated
The 3D-printed structures that could be used for space missions or heart surgery.

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Who is the laziest?
How live streaming of player data is giving sports fans unprecedented levels of analysis.

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Chatbot docs
Could health apps and AI-powered chatbots replace your traditional local doctor?

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Overwatch's ambition
Activision Blizzard reveals who has spent about $20m to buy the first Overwatch League teams.

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Liar! Liar!
False news stories have plagued the internet, but are apps and algorithms the best way to spot them?

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Far from crude
How oil firms are using ever more ingenious ways to find and extract crude oil.

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Net neutrality battle
Some internet giants and activists will participate in a day of action to oppose changes to net neutrality rules.

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Countdown to D-Day
The EU General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) start next year, but many firms are ill prepared.

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Intelligent energy
Future Energy: How artificial intelligence can be used to make power stations run more efficiently.

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F1 tech for babies
F1 tech has influenced sectors from aeronautics to public transport - now healthcare is benefiting.

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Courting new fans
Wimbledon looks to technology to reach new tennis fans.

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‘Smart’ vending machine could sell alcohol and ammunition
The machine uses biometric security to verify users have the right to buy its products.

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Can app for blind people guess Rory’s mood?
BBC Technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones tries out Microsoft's new 'Seeing AI' app for the visually impaired.

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Skype backlash: 'Worst update ever'
A new version of Skype is receiving very poor reviews on app stores.

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Sight-loss simulator helps design buildings
The virtual reality software aims to help architects consider people with sight loss.

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Geek.com
last updated: Fri, 21 Jul 2017 22:30:37 +0000

SDCC Announcement: Defenders Gets a New Trailer, Plus Punisher and Iron Fist News

Marvel’s The Defenders, the first big crossover series for their Netflix superheroes, had its big panel Friday night at San Diego Comic Con. Fans in attendance got their first prolonged look at the series, including […]

The post SDCC Announcement: Defenders Gets a New Trailer, Plus Punisher and Iron Fist News appeared first on Geek.com.

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PC World - News RSS feed
last updated: Thu, 04 May 2017 03:28:00 +1000

Sneaky Gmail phishing attack fools with fake Google Docs app
Google Docs was pulled into a sneaky email phishing attack on Tuesday that was designed to trick users into giving up access to their Gmail accounts.

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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Thu, 06 Jul 2017 11:55:23 -0400

Amazon launches a social network for spending money

Amazon launches a social network for spending moneyAmazon's Spark is a social network for spending cash.


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Galaxies collide in stunning picture
A NEW image captured by NASA Hubble space telescope shows ‘doomed duo’ galaxies colliding and then trying to destroy one another.

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CNET News
last updated: Sat, 22 Jul 2017 06:50:26 +0000

Magnepan MMGi speakers are a stupendously thin wall of sound - CNET
Chances are you've never heard -- or seen -- a speaker that sounds like the Magnepan MMGi.

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BuzzFeed - Geeky
last updated: Thu, 30 Mar 2017 13:01:14 -0400

We Know Which "Tetris" Piece You Are

Doot doodaloo do do do da do doo, doot doodaloo do da doot doot doo.

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Tech – TIME
last updated:

How to Protect Yourself Against a Ransomware Attack
Recently, a massive ransomware attack using stolen NSA hacking tools disabled an estimated 200,000 computers in more than 150 countries. The ransomware, known as WannaCry, severely affected organizations around the globe, including , the British National Health Service, car makers Renault and Nissan, and the Russian Interior Ministry. Like other ransomware, WannaCry encrypts files on…

Recently, a massive ransomware attack using stolen NSA hacking tools disabled an estimated 200,000 computers in more than 150 countries. The ransomware, known as WannaCry, severely affected organizations around the globe, including FedEx, the British National Health Service, car makers Renault and Nissan, and the Russian Interior Ministry.

Like other ransomware, WannaCry encrypts files on the infected computers, making these files inaccessible, and only releases the code to unencrypt the files when the user pays a $300 bitcoin ransom. It’s unknown how many companies have paid or plan to pay the ransom, but with critical data like patient records on the line and production lines shut down, companies have often chosen to pay up rather than lose those records forever.

What is, perhaps, most disappointing with this most recent attack is that it was 100% preventable. All the infected machines were running outdated versions of Windows XP or Vista that are no longer being supported by Microsoft. The risks of continuing to use these versions of Windows were well known (and we warned of the need to stop using XP back in 2014), yet organizations failed to take prudent measures to keep their systems up to date. Now they, and in many cases “we”, as customers and clients, are paying the price.

The good news here, to the extent there is good news, is that protecting ourselves against ransomware like Wanna Cry is not difficult. If you follow these simple steps, you should be safe from ransomware and most other cyber threats likely to come your way.

1. Keep your system up to date

If you are running Windows XP or Vista, you should immediately update your system to Windows 10 or buy a new computer. As we warned back in 2014, Microsoft is no longer supporting these ancient versions of Windows and continuing to use then makes you a prime target for cyber-attacks. And even an entry model $500 computer that will be far more powerful than your current XP one.

For those using Windows 7 and newer, make sure that you have Automatic Updates enabled so new security patches get installed as soon as they are available. These versions of Windows had already been patched by Microsoft to specifically prevent these types of ransomware attacks.

2. Use a reliable antimalware program

While antimalware programs can’t defend against every attack, they can prevent the vast majority of commonly-found malware from infecting your computer. And when new malware is discovered, antimalware providers quickly distribute updates to block it. We recommended Kaspersky in our latest analysis of the best antimalware solutions, though Bitdefender and Norton are also excellent options. And antimalware isn’t just for Windows users. Ransomware has been discovered for Macs, too.

3. Back up your data – no, really back up your data

It’s important to back up your data for a number of reasons; and the threat of ransomware is definitely one of them. But it’s not enough just to back up to an external hard drive, or even to the cloud. Many ransomware programs are specifically designed to search out backup devices, even across your network and cloud storage, encrypting everything in its path. To protect yourself, you either have to make regular backups to an external hard drive, which you then detach from your system after the backup (a pain to manage), or use a cloud service that provides automatic versioning so that if the most recent versions are encrypted, you can still recover from earlier versions. We’ve always been fans of Dropbox, which offers a 1TB storage plan for around $100 per year.

4. Keep your browser and plug-ins up to date

Some malware, including ransomware, can be delivered via “drive-by” infections. Taking advantage of vulnerabilities in common browser plugins, like Flash or Java, simply visiting a compromised site, or even viewing a malicious ad on an otherwise safe site, is all it takes for the malware to take hold. So in addition to keeping your operating system up to date, it’s just as important to keep your browser and its associated plug-ins up to date.

5. Avoid ransomware in the first place

The Wanna Cry ransomware was spread by email through an encrypted zip file attachment. You click on the attachment and unzip the file and all your precious files are now toast. This common social engineering trick has been around for years and, despite repeated warnings not to click on unknown email attachments, it’s still as effective as ever, as evidenced by the immense global success of the latest Wanna Cry attack.

DON’T BE THAT PERSON. Don’t click on or open files in email unless you know exactly what they are. Since sender names can be spoofed, simply seeing that the sender is a friend, relative or colleague is not enough. If in doubt, contact them directly to confirm that they sent you the file before you start clicking. And that goes for links, too, that may send you to infected websites (see #4 above).

This article originally appeared on Techlicious.com

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Twitter / liamalexander
last updated: Mon, 08 Oct 2012 07:22:42 +0000

liamalexander: My daily stats: 12 new followers, 9 new unfollowers via http://t.co/hROlspGI
liamalexander: My daily stats: 12 new followers, 9 new unfollowers via http://t.co/hROlspGI

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Twitter / Favorites from liamalexander
last updated: Mon, 25 Apr 2011 22:44:57 +0000

alanjonesUK: RT @PopSci: Scientists finally have some answers about the mysterious "dark matter" in the human genome: http://t.co/Gm4Fh0B6
alanjonesUK: RT @PopSci: Scientists finally have some answers about the mysterious "dark matter" in the human genome: http://t.co/Gm4Fh0B6

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Ask the Guru
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Captain marketing phone number - We are a SEO, SEM, and online advertising firm based in Los Angeles. Our experts specialize in search engine optimization, Intern

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Stumble
last updated: Fri, 25 Feb 2011 22:09:20 +0000
The Next Web
last updated:

TigerVPN grants full online security forever – for less than $50

Other than the mostly unworkable scenario of going Amish and completely detaching from the grid, you won’t find a more sound method of protecting your online information and privacy than with a top-quality VPN provider. With cyber-thieves, hackers and online snoops always lurking, you need the talents of a quality VPN provider like TigerVPN to shield everything you do on the web. Right now, you can lock in a lifetime of TigerVPN service at a ridiculously low $49 fee from TNW Deals. Encircled by TigerVPN’s 256-bit SSL military grade encryption tunnel, you can explore all corners of the web with a masked IP address…

This story continues at The Next Web

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