Yahoo News - Top Stories
last updated: Tue, 02 Sep 2014 09:48:43 -0400

U.S. factory activity expands in August at fastest pace since April 2010: Markit

Robotic arms spot welds on the chassis of a Ford Transit Van under assembly at the Ford Claycomo Assembly Plant in ClaycomoFinancial data firm Markit said its final U.S. Manufacturing Purchasing Managers Index rose to 57.9 in August from 55.8 in July, marking its highest level since April 2010.


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15 Most Stressful Jobs in the World

Everyone has a bad day at work now and then. But if you have one of these 15 Most Stressful Jobs in the World, even one bad day can get you or someone else killed. From EMT to Coal Miner to Ice Road Trucker, these are the jobs that will keep you up at nights!


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Herald Sun | Breaking News
last updated: Tue, 02 Sep 2014 08:48:17 GMT

WA man 'speeding' before Indonesia crash
PROSECUTORS have told a court an Australian man was speeding before a fatal motorcycle crash in Indonesia.

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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Mon, 01 Sep 2014 23:24:19 -0400

How does a police department lose a Humvee?

A police tactical team moves in to disperse a group of protesters on Wednesday, Aug. 13, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo. The protests were sparked after Michael Brown, an unarmed black man, was shot and killed by Darren Wilson, a white Ferguson police officer, on Aug. 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)Among the issues that Obama is likely to find is that the program lacks oversight and accountability. Once Pentagon weapons reach the 8,000 police departments that participate in the program, many of them in tiny towns, the federal government has little control over them. The departments are not allowed to sell or dispose of any of the 1033 program's “controlled” items, which include small arms and tactical vehicles. An agency in each state takes over responsibility for checking the inventory once a year and reporting anything missing to the Defense Department’s Defense Logistics Agency.


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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Mon, 01 Sep 2014 23:24:19 -0400

How does a police department lose a Humvee?

A police tactical team moves in to disperse a group of protesters on Wednesday, Aug. 13, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo. The protests were sparked after Michael Brown, an unarmed black man, was shot and killed by Darren Wilson, a white Ferguson police officer, on Aug. 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)Among the issues that Obama is likely to find is that the program lacks oversight and accountability. Once Pentagon weapons reach the 8,000 police departments that participate in the program, many of them in tiny towns, the federal government has little control over them. The departments are not allowed to sell or dispose of any of the 1033 program's “controlled” items, which include small arms and tactical vehicles. An agency in each state takes over responsibility for checking the inventory once a year and reporting anything missing to the Defense Department’s Defense Logistics Agency.


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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Mon, 01 Sep 2014 23:06:56 -0400

How does a police department lose a Humvee?

A police tactical team moves in to disperse a group of protesters on Wednesday, Aug. 13, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo. The protests were sparked after Michael Brown, an unarmed black man, was shot and killed by Darren Wilson, a white Ferguson police officer, on Aug. 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)Among the issues that Obama is likely to find is that the program lacks oversight and accountability. Once Pentagon weapons reach the 8,000 police departments that participate in the program, many of them in tiny towns, the federal government has little control over them. The departments are not allowed to sell or dispose of any of the 1033 program's “controlled” items, which include small arms and tactical vehicles. An agency in each state takes over responsibility for checking the inventory once a year and reporting anything missing to the Defense Department’s Defense Logistics Agency.


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Herald Sun | Top Stories
last updated: Tue, 02 Sep 2014 05:29:00 GMT

N64 games so good they gave you thumb blisters
WHEN you meet an 18-year-old and ask them what their favourite Nintendo 64 game was, keep this in mind: they were born in the same year the revolutionary console was released overseas.

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Radio star grieving husband’s sudden death
FRIENDS, family and the media community are rallying around radio announcer Robin Bailey as she mourns the loss of her husband.

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Former high-flyer clean out of cash
A QUEENSLAND businessman who made millions from a successful cleaning franchise has blamed a bitter divorce and his daughter’s ill health for his financial woes.

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Real estate agent led double life
ONE of Australia’s top real estate agents was allegedly living a double life, with the drug addict trafficking drugs and threatening death against those who exposed his secret.

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Tragedy strikes at family daycare
FIVE-month-old Indianna was put down to sleep at family daycare at 1pm. By 2.30pm she was unresponsive, a pre-inquest hearing has been told.

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Thaiday to miss crucial Storm clash
MATT Gillett has backed Corey Oates to fill the gaping void left by Sam Thaiday against the Storm on Friday after he was suspended by the judiciary.

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Traveller cops $447k holiday shock
AN Aussie traveller on a US trip wound up with an unexpected bill of almost half a million dollars — and it wasn’t for a fancy hotel.

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‘Disgraceful’ drink-driver ran from cops
REPEAT drink-driver found lying in mud in front of her home after car was earlier discovered bogged and damaged.

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Watchdog to investigate ex-cop
A FORMER senior detective turned private eye is at the centre of a major CCC probe into alleged money laundering and possible links to senior police and bikies.

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Justice livens up day with mafia quote
FOR a hearing that was all about bikies, it was odd that it was 40 minutes before anyone mentioned the Hells Angels.

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Live: Marsh magic gets Aussies to 282
MITCH Marsh bludgeons seven sixes in a brilliant knock that fires Australia to a big total against South Africa. Follow LIVE in Match Centre.

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Digg Top Stories
last updated: Tue, 02 Sep 2014 00:45:08 +0000

What ISIS's Leader Wants
The longer he lives, the more powerful he becomes.

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Reuters: Top News
last updated: Tue, 02 Sep 2014 05:11:51 GMT

Ukraine accuses Russia of 'undisguised aggression' as rebels advance
KIEV/MOSCOW (Reuters) - Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko accused Russia on Monday of "direct and undisguised aggression" which he said had radically changed the battlefield balance as Kiev's forces suffered a further reverse in their war with pro-Moscow separatists.






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BuzzFeed - Latest
last updated: Tue, 02 Sep 2014 04:30:11 -0400

15 Puppies That Are Desperate To Tell You It's Puppy Awareness Week

These pooches have something to say.

This week marks The Kennel Club's Puppy Awareness Week, a campaign to highlight the problem of puppy farming and online sales.

This week marks The Kennel Club's Puppy Awareness Week , a campaign to highlight the problem of puppy farming and online sales.

Jane Rowden / The Kennel Club / Via thekennelclub.org.uk

These puppies think this is very important.

These puppies think this is very important.

Susan Middlemas / The Kennel Club / Via thekennelclub.org.uk

Tracey Field / The Kennel Club


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TIME
last updated:

Happy Birthday, U.S. Treasury
You still look like a million bucks

It was 225 years ago today that the still-nascent United States finally decided to get its financial house in order. The Department of the Treasury was established on Sept. 2, 1789, during an early session of the 1st United States Congress. The Department’s duties, according to the founding law, are:

“…to digest and prepare plans for the improvement and management of the revenue…to prepare and report estimates of the public revenue, and the public expenditures; to superintend the collection of revenue; to decide on the forms of keeping and stating accounts and making returns, and to grant under the limitations herein established, or to be hereafter provided, all warrants for monies to be issued from the Treasury, in pursuance of appropriations by law.”

Or, in layman’s terms, the Treasury Department issues savings bonds, prints cash, mints coins, collects taxes through the IRS and enforces laws related to alcohol and tobacco. People often conflate the duties of the Treasury with those of the Federal Reserve, but the two are actually separate organizations. The Treasury is a department of the executive branch and is generally concerned with properly maintaining the day-to-day activities of the government. The Federal Reserve is an independent body that sets long-term fiscal policy in an effort to control borrowing and inflation rates.

Our first Secretary of the Treasury was Alexander Hamilton, a key figure in the development of early American fiscal policy who advocated heavily for a central banking system and the federal assumption of state debts following the Revolutionary War (and no, he didn’t put himself on the $10 bill — he wasn’t added to the currency until the 1920s). The current secretary is Jack Lew, appointed by President Obama in 2013.

In addition to the Treasury’s birthday, we also just passed another significant fiscal anniversary. In August 1971, the U.S. stopped converting dollars held by foreign governments to gold at a value of $35 per ounce. The policy, called the Bretton Woods system, had been put in place following World War II to convince rebuilding countries like Germany and Japan to invest in American dollars. But by the 1960s, the system was placing strain on the U.S. economy as the number of dollars held by foreign countries outpaced the amount of gold the U.S. had on hand. Following a secret meeting at Camp David with this top advisers, President Richard Nixon announced on August 15 a suspension of the policy, transforming the dollar into a floating currency not pegged to any particular exchange rate. Nixon also announced a 90-day freeze on prices and wages in the U.S. and an additional 10% tariff on imports.

Nixon's Economic Gamble
The Aug. 30, 1971, cover of TIME

Collectively known as the “Nixon Shock,” the measures surprised people both at home and abroad. Reporting in the days following the announcement, TIME wrote of foreign leaders abandoning their summer vacations to react to the announcement amid worries that the dollar, no longer tied to a fixed rate, would plummet in value. In the years that followed, countries in Europe and Asia also allowed their currencies to float, making exchange rates more volatile than they had been in the past.

Read TIME’s original 1971 report on Nixon’s controversial decision to abandon gold: The Dollar: A Power Play Unfolds

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