This Day in History
last updated: Thu, 22 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

College Board Administers the First SAT Exam (1926)
The SAT is a standardized test used in college admissions in the US. Developed by Carl Brigham, a Princeton psychologist who worked on the US Army's IQ test, the first Scholastic Aptitude Test was administered in 1926 to over 8,000 test-takers—60% of whom were male. Criticized as being biased toward whites, males, and the middle class, the exam has been modified over the years to improve fairness. Still, its value as a predictor of success in college is debated. What does "SAT" stand for today? Discuss

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Kodak Announces Discontinuation of Kodachrome Film (2009)
Manufactured by Kodak from 1935 to 2009, Kodachrome was the first commercially successful color film and was used to capture some of the most iconic images of the late 20th century. The film was known for its stability—if stored properly, it could be developed decades after being exposed and would retain its color and density for decades. Yet, advances in digital photography and the development of competing films considerably reduced demand. What famous images were recorded on Kodachrome?

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Japanese Submarine Attacks US Mainland (1942)
With the exception of the attack on Pearl Harbor, the US was able to largely avoid fighting WWII on home soil, mainly because of its relative geographical isolation. However, Japan attacked the West Coast of the US several times. In 1942, a Japanese submarine fired at Fort Stevens in Oregon in the first and only attack on a mainland US military installation during the war. The shells damaged phone cables and a baseball backstop, but the fort's gunners were ordered not to return fire. Why?

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BBC On This Day | Front Page
last updated: Thu, 14 Nov 2002 17:55:28 GMT

1983: US troops invade Grenada
American forces seize control of the Caribbean island of Grenada less than a week after a left-wing coup in which the prime minister, Maurice Bishop, was killed.

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June 23, 1992: Teflon Don sentenced to life

Mafia boss John Gotti, who was nicknamed the “Teflon Don” after escaping unscathed from several trials during the 1980s, is sentenced to life in prison after being found guilty on 14 accounts of conspiracy to commit murder and racketeering. Moments after his sentence was read in a federal courthouse in Brooklyn, hundreds of Gotti’s supporters stormed the building and overturned and smashed cars before being forced back by police reinforcements.

Gotti, born and educated on the mean streets of New York City, became head of the powerful Gambino family after boss Paul Castellano was murdered outside a steakhouse in Manhattan in December 1985. The gang assassination, the first in three decades in New York, was organized by Gotti and his colleague Sammy “the Bull” Gravano. The Gambino family was known for its illegal narcotics operations, gambling activities, and car theft. During the next five years, Gotti rapidly expanded his criminal empire, and his family grew into the nation’s most powerful Mafia family. Despite wide publicity of his criminal activities, Gotti managed to avoid conviction several times, usually through witness intimidation. In 1990, however, he was indicted for conspiracy to commit murder in the death of Paul Castellano, and Gravano agreed to testify against him in a federal district court in exchange for a reduced prison sentence.

On April 2, 1992, John Gotti was found guilty on all counts and on June 23 was sentenced to multiple life terms without the possibility of parole.

While still imprisoned, Gotti died of throat cancer on June 10, 2002.

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Twitter / WorldHistory101
last updated: Fri, 09 Sep 2011 19:33:08 +0000

WorldHistory101: More great resources: the History Channel http://t.co/P0yDU4P the Library of Congress http://t.co/3GGXZtg & Wikipedia http://t.co/Vx3B2wy
WorldHistory101: More great resources: the History Channel http://t.co/P0yDU4P the Library of Congress http://t.co/3GGXZtg & Wikipedia http://t.co/Vx3B2wy

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