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last updated: Tue, 25 Apr 2017 15:02:08 -0400

Trump lashes out after judge bats down another immigration order

Trump lashes out after judge bats down another immigration orderPresident Trump lashed out early Wednesday after a federal judge issued a temporary injunction against his "sanctuary cities" executive oder. Trump said he'd take it to the Supreme Court.


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15 Most Stressful Jobs in the World

Everyone has a bad day at work now and then. But if you have one of these 15 Most Stressful Jobs in the World, even one bad day can get you or someone else killed. From EMT to Coal Miner to Ice Road Trucker, these are the jobs that will keep you up at nights!


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Herald Sun | Breaking News
last updated: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 22:01:00 GMT

Canal jumper released on bail
AN 18-year-old man who jumped into a canal at Surfers Paradise to avoid being arrested by police on Wednesday night has been granted bail.

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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Wed, 26 Apr 2017 10:30:08 -0400

Trump lashes out after judge bats down another immigration order

Trump lashes out after judge bats down another immigration orderPresident Trump lashed out early Wednesday after a federal judge issued a temporary injunction against his "sanctuary cities" executive oder. Trump said he'd take it to the Supreme Court.


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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Tue, 25 Apr 2017 14:00:51 -0400

Trump lashes out after judge bats down another immigration order

Trump lashes out after judge bats down another immigration orderPresident Trump lashed out early Wednesday after a federal judge issued a temporary injunction against his "sanctuary cities" executive oder. Trump said he'd take it to the Supreme Court.


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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Wed, 26 Apr 2017 22:41:11 -0400

Trump lashes out after judge bats down another immigration order

Trump lashes out after judge bats down another immigration orderPresident Trump lashed out early Wednesday after a federal judge issued a temporary injunction against his "sanctuary cities" executive oder. Trump said he'd take it to the Supreme Court.


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Limbaugh Slams Trump for 'caving' On Border Wall

Limbaugh Slams Trump for 'caving' On Border WallRush Limbaugh and his listeners are worried that President Trump is losing his chance to build the promised border wall. Lawrence O'Donnell explains why this isn't the first time Trump has lost this fight.


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US Supreme Court takes narrow view on tribal immunity

US Supreme Court takes narrow view on tribal immunityThe US Supreme Court took a narrow view Tuesday on the immunity from lawsuits enjoyed by Native American tribes, which are treated in some respects like sovereign states that cannot be sued in American courts. In a case involving a limousine driver who rear-ended a car on a Connecticut freeway, the highest court in the land ruled unanimously that tribal employees do not always have immunity when involved in incidents that take place far from reservations. The justices revived a civil lawsuit filed by the injured occupants of the car in state court, overturning the Connecticut Supreme Court's decision to dismiss the case because the driver worked for the Mohegan Tribe, which runs a casino in the state.


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Russia says U.S. missile strike on Syria was a threat to its forces

Russia says U.S. missile strike on Syria was a threat to its forcesRussian Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu complained on Wednesday that a U.S. missile strike on a Syrian air base earlier this month had posed a threat to Russian troops and was forcing Moscow to take extra measures to protect them. Speaking at a security conference in Moscow, Shoigu restated Russia's view that the strike -- which Washington conducted in response to what it said was a deadly chemical weapons attack by Syrian government forces -- was "a crude violation of international law." U.S. officials said at the time that they had informed Russian forces ahead of the strikes.


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Army veteran and boyfriend ‘film themselves tying service dog to tree and shooting it five times’

Army veteran and boyfriend ‘film themselves tying service dog to tree and shooting it five times’An army veteran and her boyfriend have been arrested on animal cruelty charges after a video of the pair emerged apparently showing them tying a service dog to a tree and shooting it five times. Marinna Rollins, 23, was arrested on Tuesday in North Carolina. ​Rollins and Heng apparently filmed themselves as they tied up a pitbull named Camboui in a wooded area in Fayetteville, North Carolina, and allegedly shot it at close range five times with a rifle.


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Large Rabbit Dies On United Flight To U.S.

Large Rabbit Dies On United Flight To U.S.Simon the rabbit, slated to be the world's largest bunny in the world, died on a United Airlines flight from the U.K.


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How One Woman Shed 137 Lbs. With Strength Training and Simple Diet Changes

How One Woman Shed 137 Lbs. With Strength Training and Simple Diet ChangesThis is how Ashley Javar lost 137 pounds, one small step at a time.


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Texas poised to pass 'sanctuary city' ban with jail penalty

Texas poised to pass 'sanctuary city' ban with jail penaltyAUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Texas Republicans were poised Wednesday to take a big step toward banning "sanctuary cities" in their state, debating a bill through which police chiefs and sheriffs could even be jailed for not cooperating fully with federal immigration authorities.


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Firebrand pundit Ann Coulter cancels UC Berkeley talk

Firebrand pundit Ann Coulter cancels UC Berkeley talkConservative firebrand Ann Coulter on Wednesday canceled a planned appearance at the University of California, Berkeley, saying she had lost the backing of the groups that had sponsored her talk. "It's a sad day for free speech," Coulter told the New York Times. The right-wing commentator had insisted she would show up at Berkeley, a famously progressive campus, on Thursday even though the university said it could not provide a suitable venue because of security threats.


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Tucker Carlson and Caitlyn Jenner debate Trump and transgender rights

Tucker Carlson and Caitlyn Jenner debate Trump and transgender rightsThe conservative Fox News host made his debut in the slot formerly occupied by Bill O'Reilly with a discussion about the president's approach to LGBT issues.


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These airlines, hotels and websites received the highest customer approval ratings

These airlines, hotels and websites received the highest  customer approval ratingsJetBlue, Priceline and Hilton are the most loved travel brands according to a new customer satisfaction report. 


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Police Use Data Found on Slain Woman's Fitbit in Murder Case Against Husband

Police Use Data Found on Slain Woman's Fitbit in Murder Case Against HusbandConnie Dabate, 39, was found shot to death in the Ellington home she shared with her two children and husband, Richard Dabate, on December 23, 2015.


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Battling ISIS in Hatra, Iraq, and more: April 26 in photos

Battling ISIS in Hatra, Iraq, and more: April 26 in photosIraqi paramilitary troops fire toward Islamic State militants during a battle on the outskirts of the ancient city of Hatra, near Mosul, Iraq; the robes of Pope Francis are blown over his head by a gust of wind as he delivers his homily during the weekly audience in St. Peter’s Square in Vatican City; and demonstrators in Minsk, Belarus, mark the 31st anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster.


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Kellyanne Conway on President Trump’s first 100 days

Kellyanne Conway on President Trump’s first 100 daysYahoo Global News Anchor Katie Couric spoke with Kellyanne Conway, counselor to President Trump, about the administration’s first 100 days. When Couric asked Conway about the investigation into Michael Flynn’s failure to disclose payments from Russia, Conway told Couric, “It’s not for me to comment on personnel or active investigations in the Congress."


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Police Confirm Active Shooter In Washington Middle School

Police Confirm Active Shooter In Washington Middle SchoolPolice were responding to Hawkins Middle School in Mason County following reports of an active shooter.


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Arkansas plans fourth execution in about a week

Arkansas plans fourth execution in about a week(Reuters) - Arkansas plans to end its series of April executions by putting to death on Thursday an inmate convicted of murdering a cheerleader and who escaped from prison and killed two other people before being captured again. Arkansas, which had not held an execution in 12 years until this month, has put three inmates to death since April 20. It plans to execute Kenneth Williams, 38, by lethal injection at 7 p.m. CDT at its death chamber in its Cummins Unit prison.


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Moderates balk at conservative-backed, revised health bill

Moderates balk at conservative-backed, revised health billWASHINGTON (AP) — The moribund Republican health care bill received a jolt of life when the conservative House Freedom Caucus endorsed a revised version of the measure. But a leading GOP moderate criticized the reshaped legislation as a conservative exercise in "blame-shifting and face-saving" that wasn't winning new support from party centrists, leaving its fate unclear.


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Syria accuses Israel of strike near Damascus airport

Syria accuses Israel of strike near Damascus airportSyria accused Israel of triggering a huge explosion near Damascus airport on Thursday by firing several missiles at a military position. Israel has carried out multiple air strikes in Syria since the country's civil war erupted in 2011, most of which it has said targeted arms convoys or warehouses of its Lebanese arch-foe Hezbollah, which is a close ally of the Syrian regime. In line with its usual practice, Israel's military declined to comment on the latest blast.


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U.S. Probes Into Trump’s Russia Links, Kremlin Meddling Gain Two Heavyweights

U.S. Probes Into Trump’s Russia Links, Kremlin Meddling Gain Two HeavyweightsThe Senate investigation gains a former NSA lawyer. The FBI probe gets a veteran prosecutor.


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How badly do you want this stunning iPhone 8 to be real?

How badly do you want this stunning iPhone 8 to be real?

The iPhone 8 is arguably the most highly anticipated iPhone release we've seen in quite some time. Sure, everyone was excited about Apple finally introducing larger-screened iPhone models, first with the iPhone 5 and later with the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, but the amount of hype surrounding the iPhone 8 seems to be at a whole another level. And with good cause, the iPhone 8 promises to deliver a radical overhaul to the entire user experience, both in hardware and in software. In addition to an edgeless OLED display, there have also been strong rumblings from the rumor mill suggesting that the iPhone 8 will introduce advanced augmented reality features.

Earlier this week, photos of an alleged "dummy" iPhone 8 model surfaced online, perhaps giving us our best look yet at what Apple's next-gen iPhone will actually look like. Following up on that, the folks over at ConceptsiPhone recently put together a brand new iPhone 8 concept video which provide us with an all-encompassing three-dimensional view of Apple's 2017 flagship iPhone.

Now to be fair, some aspects of the video don't quite align with some of the rumors we've seen floating around. For example, the video depicts a white ceramic iPhone 8, a device that likely isn't on Apple's roadmap this year, if ever. Further, the video depicts an iPhone with speakers on every corner of the device, yet another design that will likely never see the light of day. Thirdly, the camera module in the video is positioned horizontally, a design seemingly at odds with a plethora of schematic leaks we've seen over the past few weeks. Nonetheless, with the iPhone 8 release still months away, it's still intriguing to take a look at iPhone 8 concept videos featuring forward-thinking designs, even if they're not actually on the horizon.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y66_1U-ulro

Most impressively, the video above gives us a more immersive look at how an edgeless OLED display might impact the user experience. Our only gripe, however minor, is that many concept videos only give us a taste of what the iOS homescreen might look like as opposed to showing us how popular apps might take advantage of an edge to edge display. One thing we hope the video gets right, though, is an embedded Touch ID sensor in the display itself, a design Apple is reportedly struggling with.

If you're intrigued by the seemingly never-ending world of iPhone 8 concept videos, the one below from Macitynet is well worth checking out.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ipwsXQ8Zwl0


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NFL prospect denies rape report made to police; no charges

NFL prospect denies rape report made to police; no chargesCLEVELAND (AP) — An attorney for former Ohio State football star Gareon Conley says the player denies an accusation made in a police report that he sexually assaulted a woman. No charges have been filed.


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Forget the AirPods: These Wireless Earbuds Are Now $24

Forget the AirPods: These Wireless Earbuds Are Now $24The AirPods are Apple's first foray into the wireless headphones industry offering a no-fuss, near-instantaneous way to wirelessly connect to your iOS device. However, at $159, they're far from cheap and their cable-free design makes them easy to misplace.


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8 Popular Part-Time Jobs for Retirees

8 Popular Part-Time Jobs for RetireesMany people continue to work after age 65, but they often prefer a part-time role. Some retirees work in low-wage jobs, likely because they need the money or appreciate some other aspect of the job, such as schedule flexibility. Here are the eight most commonly held jobs among people age 65 and older, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.


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Campus free speech battle erupts in Berkeley

Campus free speech battle erupts in BerkeleyABC's Maggie Rulli reports on Ann Coulter and UC Berkeley engaging in the latest battle over free speech on U.S. college campuses.


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Officer says 'minimal but necessary force' used on United passenger

Officer says 'minimal but necessary force' used on United passengerOne of the police officers who forcibly removed a passenger from a United Airlines flight said "minimal but necessary force" was used in the incident that became a public relations disaster for the carrier, according to a report released by the city. Video recorded by other passengers showed David Dao, a 69-year-old doctor, being dragged down the aisle with blood on his face after refusing to give up his seat on a flight from Chicago to Louisville, Kentucky on April 9. Dao suffered a concussion and a broken nose, lost two front teeth and is likely to sue the airline, according to his lawyer, Thomas Demetrio.


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Venezuela snubs regional powers as more die in unrest

Venezuela snubs regional powers as more die in unrestVenezuela says it is quitting the Organization of American States in anger at pressure from the bloc over the government's handling of a deadly political crisis. The announcement late Wednesday raised international tension over Venezuela, where unrest has left 28 people dead this month. Echoed by the United States and European Union, the OAS has led an international chorus of concern over the economic and political chaos in the major oil-exporting country.


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Call the state department's ad for Mar-a-Lago what it is: a plea for corruption | Ross Barkan

Call the state department's ad for Mar-a-Lago what it is: a plea for corruption | Ross BarkanThe state department touted the virtues of the US president’s private members club. No sitting president in American history has been so engrossed with personal profit as Donald Trump. Moving into the White House has not altered his lifelong obsession with making money.


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Father Hangs Baby Daughter on Facebook Live, Then Commits Suicide: Police

Father Hangs Baby Daughter on Facebook Live, Then Commits Suicide: PoliceThe gruesome footage was on the man's Facebook page for nearly 24 hours, authorities said.


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AP Photos: Chernobyl's ghost town draws daring visitors

AP Photos: Chernobyl's ghost town draws daring visitorsPRIPYAT, Ukraine (AP) — A bulletin board in the Ukrainian town of Pripyat still bears an edition of the Sovietsky Patriot newspaper, dated three days before the nuclear explosion that turned the city into one of the world's most baleful ghost towns.


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After two weeks with the Galaxy S8, I still think the iPhone 7 Plus is the world’s best phone

After two weeks with the Galaxy S8, I still think the iPhone 7 Plus is the world’s best phone

It's funny how months of leaks and rumors can paint what appears to be a complete picture of an upcoming smartphone. But then, once the device is finally announced, a different picture forms. All of the components and details that leak never quite seem to accurately portray the finished product, and this was exactly the case with Samsung's new Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+. Months of leaks and rumors left precious few surprises when Samsung finally unveiled its new flagship phones last month, yet we were all still completely blown away.

If you've read my in-depth Galaxy S8 review, then you know just how impressed I am with these new phones. And if you bought one yourself over the weekend, you've now experienced firsthand what the future of smartphone design feels like. But as incredible as Samsung's new design is, and as impressive as its hardware has become, I still can't call the Galaxy S8 the world's best smartphone.

As I explained in my review, the Galaxy S8 is vastly superior to Apple's iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus in terms of hardware design. Vastly. Samsung's curved edges on the front and back combined with incredibly narrow bezels result in a design that really looks and feels like the future of smartphones. As I also explained in a separate article, going back to my iPhone 7 Plus after using the Galaxy S8 feels like going back to an old tube TV after having used a flat-screen TV.

Samsung's Galaxy S8 looks better than the iPhone. It feels better than the iPhone. The display is much, much better than the screens on Apple's iPhones. But overall, it's still not the better device.

Now, I'm not suggesting that the Galaxy S8's beauty is only skin deep. The Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ are by far the smoothest and most powerful Android phones the world has ever seen. What's more, Samsung's latest version of TouchWiz (now called Samsung Experience) is its best yet, and Samsung's own Android apps have improved as well on Android 7.0 Nougat. But still, Nougat is no iOS and the Galaxy S8 is no iPhone.

Now that I've been using the Galaxy S8+ for nearly two weeks, I can safely say Apple's iPhone 7 Plus is still the best smartphone on the planet. While the Galaxy S8+ beats (nay, destroys) the iPhone 7 Plus where design and display quality are concerned, the phone's meaningful advantages end there, for the most part.

Here are five key areas where the iPhone 7 Plus still has the edge:

  1. Software is important, and iOS is still better and smoother than Android. Even with Samsung's new and improved Samsung Experience, the iPhone still has a clear advantage. Samsung Connect is also a nice start, but Apple's Continuity features are miles ahead of Samsung in terms of carrying the user experience across devices and platforms. Some might argue that software is the most important thing on a smartphone, and Apple has a huge edge here.
  2. Apps are important, and iOS apps are still better and smoother than Android apps. Perhaps it's Google's loose third-party developer guidelines, or perhaps the company's developer tools aren't on par with Apple's. Whatever the case, the Android app experience remains terribly inconsistent, and iOS versions of apps are always more refined and simpler, even when the same app is available on both platforms.
  3. Performance is important, and the iPhone 7 Plus still outperforms the Galaxy S8+. Take one look at this real-world performance test and you'll see that Android still can't keep up with iOS, even when it's being propelled by next-generation processors like the Snapdragon 835.
  4. Battery life is important, and there's still nothing else out there that can touch the iPhone 7 Plus. I wasn't able to get a good feel for the Galaxy S8+'s battery life for my review since Samsung sent my review unit late, but I've now spent more time with the phone. It'll carry most people through a full day, but Apple's phablet outlasts the S8+ by a healthy margin.
  5. Customer care is important, and there isn't a consumer electronics company in the world that can even approach Apple in this key area. The company continues to invest heavily in after-sales service, and that investment will always pay off big time. Samsung has gotten better and its on-device customer service feature is a nice addition, but it's still nothing like dealing with Apple support.

Many people are tied to Android and Google's ecosystem, which is perfectly fine. For these people, the Galaxy S8 is as good as it gets. Google's services are the best in the world, and they're free. While most Google products are available on iOS these days, they'll never be as deeply integrated on the iPhone as they are on Android phones. But if you want the best overall user experience from top to bottom, there's only one place to turn. Samsung's Galaxy S8 is impressive, but the reigning king hasn't yet been dethroned.


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Amazon's New Echo Look Makes Alexa the Fashion Police

Amazon's New Echo Look Makes Alexa the Fashion PoliceAlexa, do these pants make me look fat? Amazon's newest voice-powered device, the Echo Look, is a $199 Wi-Fi connected camera that you can use to check out how you look in your favorite outfits. When you say "Alexa, take a picture" or "Alexa, take a video," the Echo Look will snap a shot of you, and then upload it to the Echo Look app, where you can review what you're wearing and what you've worn in the past.


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Ukraine feels the heat over Trump’s links to Russia

Ukraine feels the heat over Trump’s links to RussiaThe death of an American member of an international monitoring team in eastern Ukraine in a landmine blast, which also injured a Czech colleague, is the latest act of lethal violence putting enormous stress on the country’s fragile ceasefire. The response of the US State Department has, so far, been restrained, praising the courage of the monitors, expressing “shock and sadness”, and urging Russia to use its influence with the eastern separatists to allow a “full, transparent and timely investigation” to take place. Every move by the US in Ukraine is being watched anxiously by the country’s president, Petro Poroshenko.


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What we do in the next 5 years will determine the fate of the melting Arctic

What we do in the next 5 years will determine the fate of the melting ArcticGlobal warming has pushed the Arctic into a new state unprecedented in human history, with thinning and retreating sea ice, skyrocketing air and sea temperatures, melting permafrost, and glaciers that are shedding ice at increasing rates.  All of these impacts and more may seem remote at first — after all, few of us live in Nunavut — but if you're a coastal resident anywhere in the world, from New York City to Dhaka, Bangladesh, what happens in the Arctic will affect you during the next several decades and beyond, primarily through sea level rise.  SEE ALSO: Trump White House reveals it's 'not familiar' with well-studied costs of global warming The economic effects of all Arctic warming impacts may be enough to dent the gross domestic product of some countries, with cost estimates ranging from $7 trillion to $90 trillion by the end of this century. These are the conclusions of a new, comprehensive assessment of the Arctic climate by a division of the Arctic Council — a cooperative, governing body that helps oversee development in the Far North.  Sea ice (TOP) meets land as seen from NASA's Operation IceBridge research aircraft above Greenland.Image: Mario Tama/Getty ImagesThe scientific report, released on Tuesday, is known as Snow, Water, Ice, and Permafrost in the Arctic, or SWIPA. About 90 scientists helped produce the report, while more than two-dozen experts peer-reviewed the results.  The document contains two key findings that anyone concerned about the future of not just the Arctic, but the entire globe, should take note of.  The first is that the Arctic Ocean could be free of summer sea ice starting as early as the late 2030s, which is earlier than other estimates have shown. The second is that rapid Arctic warming is driving greater melting of land ice in the region, which led scientists to conclude that consensus projections of global sea level rise made in 2013 are too conservative. Compared to the previous SWIPA report, which was produced in 2011, the new assessment paints a far more dire picture of an Arctic climate in overdrive.  It also offers hope that action can be taken now to slow down and eventually stabilize Arctic warming after about the year 2050. But time is running out. Even with rapid action to curb global warming pollutants like carbon dioxide and methane, the Arctic most of us grew up with — featuring thick sea ice making the region virtually impenetrable year-round — is gone, and is not likely to return anytime in the next century.  Sea ice thickness trends, showing the thinning trend in recent years.Image: zack labe"... The Arctic of today is different in many respects from the Arctic of the past century, or even the Arctic of 20 years ago," the report states. "Many of the changes underway are due to a simple fact: Ice, snow, and frozen ground — the components of the Arctic cryosphere — are sensitive to heat."  Based on computer model projections, the report states that average fall and winter temperatures in the Arctic will increase up to 5 degrees Celsius, or 9 degrees Fahrenheit, above late 20th century values by the middle of the century, even if relatively stringent greenhouse gas emissions cuts are made.  Such temperature thresholds are already being reached in some months, with January 2016 recording a temperature anomaly of 9 degrees Fahrenheit above the 1981-2010 average for the region, with even higher anomalies seen during October through February of the same year.  This past winter was the warmest on record for the Arctic, and for the third straight year, Arctic sea ice peaked at a record low level during the winter. This has left sea ice in a precariously thin and sparse state as the upcoming melt season nears.  The report contains valuable findings on what would happen to Arctic climate change if the world were to come close to meeting the goals set by the Paris Climate Agreement. That treaty, which went into force in November 2016, aims to keep global warming to well under 2 degrees Celsius, or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit, above preindustrial levels through the year 2100.  It's unclear whether the agreement's goals are still feasible, considering that the U.S. — the world's second-largest emitter — is considering pulling out of it altogether, and other nations have yet to offer plans to cut their emissions in line with the temperature target.  A "drunken forest" in Fairbanks Alaska where trees are collapsing into the ground due to permafrost melt.Image: Warming Images/REX/ShutterstockMeeting the Paris targets would help slow the pace and reduce the severity of Arctic warming, but it "would not stabilize the loss of Arctic glaciers, ice sheets, and ice caps," the report states.  "The recent SWIPA assessment tells that the changes in the Arctic are bound to continue at the current rate until mid-century," said Morten Skovgaard Olsen, who chaired the new report, in an email.  "But it also tells that immediate and ambitious green-house gas reductions will slow the speed of changes beyond mid-century and even stabilize change beyond mid century, preventing major further impacts associated with the Arctic melt .” Any carbon pollution cuts made now will have the most significant influence on what the Arctic will look like after about 2050, the report's authors said at a press conference Tuesday in Virginia.  “The changes are cumulative, and so what we do in the next 5 years is really important on slowing down the changes that will happen in the next 30 or 40 years," said James Overland, a climate scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.  "The emphasis on action and immediacy is one of the main findings” from the report, he said.  NASA project scientist Nathan Kurtz surveys an iceberg locked in sea ice near Pituffik, Greenland.Image: mario tama/Getty ImagesForeign ministers from the eight Arctic nations will meet in Fairbanks, Alaska on May 11 to discuss these findings and other issues pertaining to the region. Some discussion on the Paris agreement may take place, particularly along the sidelines of the talks. According to the SWIPA report, meltwater from Arctic glaciers has contributed 35 percent of current sea level rise, with the greatest contribution coming from Greenland.  The planet's largest island lost an average of 375 gigatons of ice per year. This is equivalent to losing a block of ice measuring 4.6 miles on all sides, from 2011 to 2014 alone. It amounts to twice the melt rate from 2003 to 2008. In addition, thawing permafrost is harming infrastructure from Alaska to Siberia, with landslides and mysterious craters swallowing parts of the Russian Arctic.  In Alaska, the report found that wildfires in taiga forests are worse now than at any time in the past 10,000 years, due to hotter, drier summers and earlier spring snowmelt. WATCH: Stunning drone footage captures rare video of blue whales feeding


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U.S. slams South Sudan's Kiir over 'man-made' famine, urges truce

U.S. slams South Sudan's Kiir over 'man-made' famine, urges truceBy Michelle Nichols UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - The United States slammed South Sudan's President Salva Kiir on Tuesday for the African state's "man-made" famine and ongoing conflict, urging him to fulfill a month-old pledge of a unilateral truce by ordering his troops back to their barracks. "We must see a sign that progress is possible," U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley told a United Nations Security Council briefing on South Sudan. "We must see that ceasefire implemented." South Sudan descended into civil war in 2013 after Kiir fired his deputy, unleashing a conflict that has spawned armed factions often following ethnic lines.


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'All on me:' US admiral takes blame in carrier to N.Korea fiasco

'All on me:' US admiral takes blame in carrier to N.Korea fiascoThe US admiral who ordered an aircraft carrier and other warships toward the Korean Peninsula in a much-hyped deployment took responsibility Wednesday for any "confusion" after the ships sailed in the opposite direction. Amid soaring tensions ahead of North Korea's apparent ramping up for a sixth nuclear test, the US Navy on April 8 said it was directing a naval strike group headed by the USS Carl Vinson carrier to "sail north" from the waters off Singapore, as a "prudent measure" to deter Pyongyang.


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Hezbollah's defiant signal to Israel, Lebanon, and the UN

Hezbollah's defiant signal to Israel, Lebanon, and the UNThe stated objective of the Hezbollah-coordinated press tour of southern Lebanon was to see new Israeli defensive installations on the border – indications, according to the powerful Shiite Lebanese militia, of Israeli fears of Hezbollah’s growing military might. The unprecedented spectacle appeared to be a deliberate and calculated breach of a UN Security Council resolution that bans non-state forces from bearing arms in southern Lebanon, and it illustrated the unmatched sway Hezbollah wields, and the impunity it enjoys throughout the country. Recommended: Hezbollah 101: Who is the militant group, and what does it want?


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The Latest: Police say woman in pit had reported harassment

The Latest: Police say woman in pit had reported harassmentBLANCHESTER, Ohio (AP) — The Latest on a woman found in a pit in her neighbor's shed (all times local):


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'Talking Cars' Dishes on Mazda CX-5, Jeep Compass, and Honda Clarity FCV

'Talking Cars' Dishes on Mazda CX-5, Jeep Compass, and Honda Clarity FCVFew vehicles have elicited as much interest from our viewers and readers as the redesigned 2017 Mazda CX-5 small SUV. This Mazda stands out in a category filled with competent but uninteresting m...


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Amazon’s $96 sound bar is so good it doesn’t need a separate subwoofer

Amazon’s $96 sound bar is so good it doesn’t need a separate subwoofer

It used to be that if you wanted to add decent sound to your TV, you need to spend upwards of $1,000 on a surround sound system. The the home audio market got much more competitive, and prices began to fall. Things really took a turn when companies began launching sound bars, which cost less to make and didn't require users to run cables all over their homes. Fast-forward to today, and you can get a solid sound bar with a wireless subwoofer for between $200 and $300.

And then there's the AmazonBasics 2.1 Channel Bluetooth Sound Bar with Built-In Subwoofer, a 4-star rated home audio solution that costs less than $100. The nifty design builds the sub right into the sound bar itself, delivering great sound, a compact design, and the easiest possible installation.

Here are a few more details from the product page:

  • 31.5-inch sound bar with built-in subwoofer enhances home-audio systems (not compatible with universal or TV remotes)
  • Bluetooth technology v2.1 + EDR with A2DP & AVRCP for seamless streaming from various devices
  • Full-range stereo speakers; up to 92 dB (2.1 channels)
  • 4-piece 2-inch round frame; mid- to high-range drivers; 4-by-2.7-inch sub-range driver; 2-piece passive radiator
  • 3 sound modes: Standard, News, and Movie; remote control and wall-mount hardware included; measures 31.5 by 3.2 by 3.5 inches (W x H x D)


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Donald Trump administration loses trade battle over tuna as WTO lets Mexico hit US with sanctions

Donald Trump administration loses trade battle over tuna as WTO lets Mexico hit US with sanctionsThe US has just lost a major trade battle with Mexico and it revolved around tuna. On Tuesday, the World Trade Organisation ruled that Mexico is allowed to impose $163m (£127m) a year in sanctions against the US on trade in tuna, ending a years-long dispute. The clash, which dates back to 2008, centred on the US insisting that any Mexican tuna sold in the US must have a ‘dolphin safe’ guarantee, meaning that no dolphins were killed by fishermen catching the tuna.


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A Telecom Merger Frenzy Is Coming

A Telecom Merger Frenzy Is ComingTelecom investors should be gearing up for a potential wave of mergers and acquisitions in coming months. According to T-Mobile ( TMUS) CEO John Legere, a number of companies will likely be looking to make strategic deals, including T-Mobile. Earlier in April, a Federal Communications Commission auction of U.S. government wireless airwaves that began last year finally came to a close.


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Slain friend of Robert Durst once posed as his missing wife: testimony

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Here’s How Much Coffee Is Really Safe to Drink
Whether you’re starting your day with a strong cup of coffee or indulging in a mid-afternoon pick-me-up, caffeine is a drug that many people don’t want to quit. And thankfully, you don’t have to: A new scientific review offers reassurance that, in moderate amounts, caffeine is perfectly healthy. The paper confirms the results of the…

Whether you’re starting your day with a strong cup of coffee or indulging in a mid-afternoon pick-me-up, caffeine is a drug that many people don’t want to quit. And thankfully, you don’t have to: A new scientific review offers reassurance that, in moderate amounts, caffeine is perfectly healthy.

The paper confirms the results of the last big review done on caffeine safety, back in 2003: that intake levels of up to 400 mg a day, or about four 8-ounce cups of coffee, are not associated with health risks for adults. The results, published in Food and Chemical Toxicology, were recently presented at the Experimental Biology conference in Chicago.

“After decades of research and thousands of papers, we know a lot about caffeine,” says lead author Daniele Wikoff, health sciences practice leader at ToxStrategies, a private scientific consulting firm. “And what our findings truly confirm is that having caffeine as part of your daily diet is still acceptable and without adverse effects.”

The new review also found that existing upper limits for pregnant women (300 mg a day) and children (about 1.1 mg per pound) continue to be supported by scientific data. “This should give pregnant women some comfort that they do not need to eliminate caffeine from their diet,” says Wikoff.

Although there’s no change to the current recommendations, an update was long overdue, says Wikoff. Since the widely-cited 2003 review on caffeine was conducted by Health Canada, more than 10,000 papers have been published on the drug’s effects on various aspects of health.

That’s why the North American branch of International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI), a nonprofit foundation dedicated to advancing the understanding of nutrition and food safety, decided to commission an analysis on more recent literature. (ILSI North America receives funding from the American Beverage Association and the National Coffee Association. Both organizations “received periodic progress reports but did not participate in any aspect of the systematic review,” the authors note in the paper.)

In the new review, the institute recruited ToxStrategies to comb through more than 700 studies conducted on humans and published between 2001 and 2015. In addition to scientists from ToxStrategies, the research team consisted of seven scientific advisory board members from academic institutions across the U.S. and Canada, with expertise in the paper’s different areas of focus.

Health.com: 12 Surprising Sources of Caffeine

The researchers narrowed those studies down to 426 for inclusion in the review, all of which focused on how caffeine related to five specific topics: toxicity, bone health and calcium intake, cardiovascular effects (including blood pressure and heart rate), behavioral health (including headaches, mood, and sleep), and reproduction and development (including fertility, miscarriage, and birth defects).

Despite all the new research, the paper’s conclusions remain generally the same as the previous review’s. More than 90% of Americans currently consume less than 400 mg a day of caffeine, the authors wrote, and the findings of the new review “support the safety of standard consumption practices in the United States.”

The authors did note that studies on caffeine in children were limited. While they found no need to recommend a change in current recommendations, they do say that more research on this age group would be valuable. (The American Academy of Pediatrics maintains a long-held position that caffeinated beverages, especially energy drinks, should be avoided in children.)

And because research on the general safety of caffeine is so plentiful, they also recommend that future studies shift their focus to unhealthy populations, sensitive groups, and ways that people may be affected differently on an individual level.

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The studies included in the review looked at a variety of caffeine sources, including coffee, tea, chocolate, other beverages, and supplements, but the review did not evaluate the health effects associated with these different sources separately. When considering your caffeine intake, says Health’s medical editor Dr. Roshini Raj, it’s important to keep in mind the entire food or drink.

Plain coffee, for example, is rich in antioxidants and may reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. Soda and fancy coffee concoctions, on the other hand, can be high in calories or contain artificial sweeteners, while energy drinks can contain sugar and other stimulants that have been associated with health risks.

Dr. Raj also says that just because 400 mg a day of caffeine is safe, that doesn’t mean it’s right for everyone. “We don’t all metabolize caffeine the same way: Some people find that even a little cup of coffee or tea can make them restless,” she wrote in a recent column for Health. “Listen to your body, and if you tend to get jittery, try spacing out your caffeinated beverages,” she added.

If you find that you’re becoming dependent on caffeine, make sure you’re getting enough sleep—or talk to your doctor about why else you might be so tired, Dr. Raj adds. You can always try an all-natural energy enhancer, too: A recent study found that 10 minutes of stair-walking provided a better boost than a 50-mg caffeine pill.

This article originally appeared on Health.com

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