Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Fri, 21 Apr 2017 11:09:01 -0400

Trump praises far-right French candidate Le Pen as vote looms

Trump praises far-right French candidate Le Pen as vote loomsPresident Trump predicted on Friday that a deadly shooting on the famed Champs-Élysées avenue in Paris would have “a big effect” on French elections.


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15 Most Stressful Jobs in the World

Everyone has a bad day at work now and then. But if you have one of these 15 Most Stressful Jobs in the World, even one bad day can get you or someone else killed. From EMT to Coal Miner to Ice Road Trucker, these are the jobs that will keep you up at nights!


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Herald Sun | Breaking News
last updated: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 22:01:00 GMT

Canal jumper released on bail
AN 18-year-old man who jumped into a canal at Surfers Paradise to avoid being arrested by police on Wednesday night has been granted bail.

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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Sat, 22 Apr 2017 11:44:09 -0400

Trump praises far-right French candidate Le Pen as vote looms

Trump praises far-right French candidate Le Pen as vote loomsPresident Trump predicted on Friday that a deadly shooting on the famed Champs-Élysées avenue in Paris would have “a big effect” on French elections.


full story

Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Fri, 21 Apr 2017 09:45:30 -0400

Trump praises far-right French candidate Le Pen as vote looms

Trump praises far-right French candidate Le Pen as vote loomsPresident Trump predicted on Friday that a deadly shooting on the famed Champs-Élysées avenue in Paris would have “a big effect” on French elections.


full story

Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Fri, 21 Apr 2017 23:55:35 -0400

Trump praises far-right French candidate Le Pen as vote looms

Trump praises far-right French candidate Le Pen as vote loomsPresident Trump predicted on Friday that a deadly shooting on the famed Champs-Élysées avenue in Paris would have “a big effect” on French elections.


full story

Herald Sun | Top Stories
last updated: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 09:41:00 GMT

Response from Eddie, AFL not nearly enough
THERE'S so much wrong about the Eddie McGuire-James-Brayshaw-Danny Frawley pack mentality attack of Caroline Wilson. As was the AFL's insipid response on Monday.

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Secret tape not the only talking point
THE reasons behind a decision to release a secret expletive-laden recording of former Chief Justice Tim Carmody are almost as juicy as the tape is expected to be.

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Digg Top Stories
last updated: Sun, 23 Apr 2017 00:12:05 +0000

Ass-Chewing And Schadenfreude: Inside Hillary's Failed Campaign
A new tell-all details Clinton's bid for the presidency.

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Delays dog 'shovel ready' projects in Trump's infrastructure plan
NEW YORK (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump reassured manufacturers gathered in the White House Roosevelt room on March 31 that a massive infrastructure program was coming soon.

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BuzzFeed - Latest
last updated: Sun, 23 Apr 2017 07:01:46 -0400

17 Cheat Sheets If You're Vegetarian Or Vegan

Or if you're just trying to eat (or spend!) a little less on meat and dairy.


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TIME
last updated:

The Successful College Dropout Is a Myth
Most leaders stayed in school

When Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg was asked to give this year’s commencement address at Harvard, he asked for advice from Bill Gates.

Zuckerberg said, “They know we didn’t actually graduate, right?”

To which Gates replied, “Oh, that is the best part! They actually give you a degree!”

This recent exchange between two famous Harvard dropouts might lead you to think college doesn’t matter. Numerous media stories and even famous billionaires are glamorizing dropouts or encouraging kids to skip college entirely.

While it’s true there are successful college dropouts, statistically speaking, they are not the norm. As researchers in education and talent, we found that the vast majority of the country’s success stories are college graduates, such as Sheryl Sandberg (Harvard), Jeff Bezos (Princeton) and Marissa Mayer (Stanford).

The myth of the mega-successful college dropout

In a recent study, we investigated how many of the wealthiest and most influential people graduated college. We studied 11,745 U.S. leaders, including CEOs, federal judges, politicians, multi-millionaires and billionaires, business leaders and the most globally powerful men and women.

We also examined how many people graduated from an “elite school.” (Our definition included the eight Ivy League schools, plus many of the top national universities and liberal arts colleges consistently high in the U.S. News rankings for both undergraduate and graduate education.)

We found about 94% of these U.S. leaders attended college, and about 50% attended an elite school. Though almost everyone went to college, elite school attendance varied widely. For instance, only 20.6% of House members and 33.8% of 30-millionaires attended an elite school, but over 80% of Forbes’ most powerful people did. For whatever reason, about twice as many senators – 41% – as House members went to elite schools.

For comparison, based on census and college data, we estimate that only about 2–5% of all U.S. undergraduates went to one of the elite schools in our study. The people from our study attended elite schools at rates well above typical expectations.

Do elite schools matter?

This year, elite schools saw an increase in applications and selectivity. Research suggests there is no difference in adult income between students who attended highly selective schools and students with similar SAT scores who attended less selective schools. At least for long-term earnings, where you go may not be critical, as long as you attend and graduate.

Yet, our data show that for students with talent and motivation to make it to the top of U.S. society, an elite college might just help you get there – whether it’s the networks you acquire or the brand on your resume.

While looking at over 11,000 successful leaders, we rarely encountered people who came from extremely poor or disadvantaged backgrounds. Helping disadvantaged talented students enter elite schools could promote diversity among future leaders.

College matters

Admittedly, the educational path of the cream of the crop may not apply to most people. So, going to college may not be the right or even the best path for everyone. However, if you’re a student thinking about not going to college or considering dropping out, remember that even Gates and Zuckerberg got into college. Even if you’re not aiming for mega success, doing the work to get into and graduate from college today may open important doors.

Perhaps in the future, college may not be as important to employers. But for now, college dropouts who rule the world are rare exceptions – not the rule.

Jonathan Wai is a Research Scientist at Duke University and Heiner Rindermann is Professor of Educational and Developmental Psychology at Chemnitz University of Technology

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

The Conversation

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