Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Wed, 22 Mar 2017 12:48:05 -0400

Trump on the health care vote: ‘I hope that it’s going to all work out’

Trump on the health care vote: ‘I hope that it’s going to all work out’President Trump drummed up support for the GOP health care bill and expressed optimism it will pass a House floor vote in a Tuesday night speech before an audience of Republican members of Congress, donors and loyalists. Among other things, Trump predicted “great surprises” and said he hopes “it’s going to all work out” when he discussed the Obamacare repeal bill, which has faced opposition from the Republican Party’s conservative and moderate wings. Trump and House Speaker Paul Ryan face a major test on Thursday, when the House is set to vote on the legislation embraced by the party leadership.


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15 Most Stressful Jobs in the World

Everyone has a bad day at work now and then. But if you have one of these 15 Most Stressful Jobs in the World, even one bad day can get you or someone else killed. From EMT to Coal Miner to Ice Road Trucker, these are the jobs that will keep you up at nights!


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Herald Sun | Breaking News
last updated: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 22:01:00 GMT

Canal jumper released on bail
AN 18-year-old man who jumped into a canal at Surfers Paradise to avoid being arrested by police on Wednesday night has been granted bail.

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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Wed, 22 Mar 2017 21:50:01 -0400

London attack: 5 dead, 40 injured in ‘terrorist’ incident on Westminster Bridge

London attack: 5 dead, 40 injured in ‘terrorist’ incident on Westminster BridgeFive people were killed and 40 others injured after an attacker plowed a car into a crowd of people on Westminster Bridge in London on Wednesday afternoon in what U.K. officials are investigating as an act of terrorism. British police are treating the incident as terrorism. London Mayor Sadiq Khan released a video statement condemning the attack.


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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Wed, 22 Mar 2017 17:11:00 -0400

London attack: 5 dead, 40 injured in ‘terrorist’ incident on Westminster Bridge

London attack: 5 dead, 40 injured in ‘terrorist’ incident on Westminster BridgeFive people were killed and 40 others injured after an attacker plowed a car into a crowd of people on Westminster Bridge in London on Wednesday afternoon in what U.K. officials are investigating as an act of terrorism. British police are treating the incident as terrorism. London Mayor Sadiq Khan released a video statement condemning the attack.


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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Tue, 21 Mar 2017 16:20:35 -0400

London attack: 5 dead, 40 injured in ‘terrorist’ incident on Westminster Bridge

London attack: 5 dead, 40 injured in ‘terrorist’ incident on Westminster BridgeFive people were killed and 40 others injured after an attacker plowed a car into a crowd of people on Westminster Bridge in London on Wednesday afternoon in what U.K. officials are investigating as an act of terrorism. British police are treating the incident as terrorism. London Mayor Sadiq Khan released a video statement condemning the attack.


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Herald Sun | Top Stories
last updated: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 09:41:00 GMT

Response from Eddie, AFL not nearly enough
THERE'S so much wrong about the Eddie McGuire-James-Brayshaw-Danny Frawley pack mentality attack of Caroline Wilson. As was the AFL's insipid response on Monday.

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Secret tape not the only talking point
THE reasons behind a decision to release a secret expletive-laden recording of former Chief Justice Tim Carmody are almost as juicy as the tape is expected to be.

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Digg Top Stories
last updated: Thu, 23 Mar 2017 15:49:02 +0000

The Wall Street Informant Who Double-Crossed The FBI
Guy Gentile flipped, and flipped again.

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U.S. House vote looms; Trump struggles to win Obamacare repeal
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump was to make a final push on Thursday to get the support needed to begin dismantling Obamacare in the House of Representatives but faced signs that enough Republicans might oppose the bill to jeopardize one of his top legislative priorities.

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BuzzFeed - Latest
last updated: Thu, 23 Mar 2017 15:55:39 -0400

On Life Support 😷 🚑

Republicans Scramble At Last-Minute To Save Health Care Bill


View Entire Post ›

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TIME
last updated:

What to Know About the Suspected London Attacker
Masood had multiple prior convictions

London’s Metropolitan Police Force formally identified the man they believe was behind the Westminster Parliament attacks as Khalid Masood.

Here’s what you need to know.

What happened?

Police say they believe Masood drove a rental car into pedestrians walking on Westminster Bridge, near the British Parliament. He then fatally stabbed a police officer outside the Parliament before being shot and killed, officials said. Including Masood, four people were killed and around 40 are thought to be injured.

Who Was The Attacker?

Masood, 52, was a British man born in Kent, a county in South East England, police said. He was known to police and had multiple previous convictions including for inflicting grievous bodily harm and for possessing offensive weapons, according to a police statement.

Masood, who also went by other aliases, was last convicted in 2003 for possessing a knife, the police statement said. He had no terrorism convictions and police said there was “no prior intelligence” about his intentions to commit an attack, the Associated Press reports.

British Prime Minister Theresa May earlier told lawmakers that Masood was “not part of the current intelligence picture.”

Did he act alone?

May told lawmakers on Wednesday that it was believed Masood “acted alone.” ISIS have claimed responsibility for the attack, according to the Associated Press. Metropolitan Police counterterrorism chief Mark Rowley had said earlier that the attack was “inspired by international terrorism.”

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American Tourist Killed in London Attack Was Celebrating His Wedding Anniversary: ‘This Pain Is So Heartwrenching’
"This pain is so heartwrenching"

A Utah man celebrating his 25th anniversary with his wife was one of the four victims killed in the London terror attack, his family said Thursday.

Kurt Cochran, 54, succumbed to injuries he sustained when a knife-wielding assailant mowed down dozens on the Westminster Bridge Wednesday with an SUV — and his wife, Melissa Payne Cochran, is still in the hospital battling multiple injuries including a broken leg and rib, according to the BBC.

“Our family is heartbroken to learn of the death of our son-in-law, Kurt W Cochran, who was a victim of Wednesday’s terrorist attack in London,” the Facebook post said, according to the Guardian. “Kurt was a good man and a loving husband to our daughter and sister, Melissa.”

The Cochran’s were visiting London to celebrate their 25th anniversary and visiting Melissa’s family, the BBC reported.

“This pain is so heartwrenching and raw it has rocked our family and all that knew him to its core. We will miss Kurt beyond words. We love you Kurt. RIP,” Cochran’s sister-in-law Shantell Payne wrote on Facebook.

President Donald Trump also paid tribute to Cochran, calling him a “great American.”

The assailant, who was fatally shot after stabbing a police officer outside Parliament, was identified Thursday by British authorities as 52-year-old Khalid Masood. At least eight other people have been arrested in connection to the rampage, which left four dead and at least 40 people injured.

[BBC]

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GOP Intelligence Chairman Apologizes for Not Talking to Democrats Before White House Trip
"Sometimes you make the right decision, sometimes you make [the] wrong decision," he said

(WASHINGTON) — The House intelligence committee chairman privately apologized to his Democratic colleagues on Thursday, yet publicly defended his decision to openly discuss and brief President Donald Trump on typically secret intercepts that he says swept up communications of the president’s transition team.

GOP Rep. Devin Nunes’ decision to disclose the information before talking to committee members outraged Democrats and raised questions about the independence of the panel’s probe of Russian interference into the 2016 election and possible contacts between Trump associates and Russia.

“It was a judgment call on my part,” Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., told reporters Thursday morning. “Sometimes you make the right decision, sometimes you make wrong decision.”

A congressional aide familiar with Nunes’ meeting said the chairman apologized to Democrats and pledged to work with them and share information related to the investigation.

“A credible investigation cannot be conducted this way,” said Rep. Adam Schiff, the top Democrat on the House panel.

The White House quickly embraced Nunes’ revelations and the president said they “somewhat” validated his wiretapping allegations.

Nunes’ critics also questioned whether the California congressman was coordinating with the White House in order to give the president cover for his explosive claims that Barack Obama wire tapped Trump’s New York skyscraper.

Nunes, who served on Trump’s transition team, ducked questions about whether he was parroting information given to him by the White House, saying only that he was “not going to ever reveal sources.” He maintained that Trump’s explosive wiretapping allegations against Obama were false.

Rep. Jackie Speier, D-Calif., said Nunes apologized to the minority members of the committee. She told reporters on Capitol Hill that she doesn’t know where the information came from, but recalled a comment Trump made in a Fox News interview earlier this month where he said the White House “will be submitting things before the committee very soon that hasn’t been submitted as of yet.”

The disclosure came two days after FBI Director James Comey publicly confirmed the bureau’s own investigation into the Trump campaign’s connections with Russia. Comey’s comments came during the intelligence committee’s first public hearing on Russia’s election interference, an investigation being overseen by Nunes.

Nunes said he received the new intelligence information after that hearing. He said it revealed that Trump’s transition associates — and perhaps Trump himself — had their communications picked up through legal surveillance.

The surveillance was conducted legally, Nunes said, and did not appear to be related to the FBI’s Russia investigation. He said his concern was that the identities of the Trump officials were improperly revealed and the contents of their communications were “widely disseminated” in intelligence reports.

Speaking to reporters outside the White House, Nunes said, “What I’ve read bothers me, and I think it should bother the president himself and his team.”

Nunes briefed reporters on the new information without consulting with Schiff or other Democrats on the committee.

Rep. Jackie Speier, D-Calif., said Nunes’ disclosure could be a “weapon of mass distraction” in light of allegations of coordination between Russians and the Trump campaign during the 2016 campaign against Democrat Hillary Clinton.

“This could be a lot of theatrics,” said Speier, also a member of the House intelligence committee.

“This is a bizarre situation,” Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., said in an interview on MSNBC. “I’m calling for a select committee because I think this back-and-forth shows that Congress no longer has the credibility to handle this alone.”

Later, in an interview with MSNBC, Schiff said evidence “that is not circumstantial and is very much worthy of an investigation” exists of Trump associates colluding with Russia as it interfered in last year’s election. He did not outline that evidence.

It’s common for Americans to get caught up in U.S. surveillance of foreigners, such as foreign diplomats in the U.S. talking to an American. Typically, the American’s name would not be revealed in a report about the intercepted communications. However, if there is a foreign intelligence value to revealing the American’s name, it is “unmasked” and shared with other intelligence analysts who are working on related foreign intelligence surveillance.

Schiff disputed Nunes’ suggestions that there was improper “unmasking.” He said that after speaking with Nunes, it appeared that the names of Americans were still guarded in the intercepts though their identities could be gleaned from the materials.

Obama administration officials disputed the suggestion that the outgoing administration was improperly monitoring its successors. Ned Price, who served as spokesman for Obama’s National Security Council, said Nunes’ assertions “were nothing more than an attempt to offer a lifeline to a White House caught in its own netting following President Trump’s baseless tweets.”

Matthew Waxman, a national security law professor at Columbia University, said Nunes’ actions “in this case are contributing to, rather than alleviating concerns, about politicization of intelligence.”

Nunes said the information on the Trump team was collected in November, December and January, the period after the election when Trump was holding calls with foreign leaders, interviewing potential Cabinet secretaries and beginning to sketch out administration policy. He said the monitored material was “widely disseminated” in intelligence reports.

Asked whether he believed the transition team had been spied on, Nunes said: “It all depends on one’s definition of spying.”

Nunes did not identify any of the Trump associates he said were “unmasked,” but they are believed to include Michael Flynn, who was fired as White House national security adviser after misleading Vice President Mike Pence and other top officials about his contacts with Russia’s ambassador to the United States.

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Only 17 Percent of Voters Like the GOP Health Care Bill: Poll
The Republican health care bill got some bad news on the day the House is scheduled to vote: Only 17 percent of American voters approve of the proposal. According to a Quinnipiac University national poll released Thursday, 56 percent of Americans disapprove of the Republican alternative to the Affordable Care Act, with 26 percent undecided.…

The Republican health care bill got some bad news on the day the House is scheduled to vote: Only 17 percent of American voters approve of the proposal.

According to a Quinnipiac University national poll released Thursday, 56 percent of Americans disapprove of the Republican alternative to the Affordable Care Act, with 26 percent undecided.

“Replacing Obamacare will come with a price for elected representatives who vote to scrap it, say many Americans, who clearly feel their health is in peril under the Republican alternative,” said Tim Malloy, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Poll.

The poll also found that 46 percent said they would be less likely to vote for their lawmakers if they back the Republican health care law, while only 19 percent said they would be more likely and 29 percent said it would not matter.

An even higher number opposed cuts to Medicaid. Voters opposed cutting federal funding to the health care program for the poor by 74 to 22 percent. One recent version of the bill would not allow any more states to expand Medicaid eligibility under the Affordable Care Act, allow states to require some enrollees work as a condition of getting coverage and begin reducing enrollment through attrition in 2020.

The survey of 1,056 voters across the country was conducted on landlines and cell phones from March 16 to 21. It has a margin of error of plus or minus three percentage points.

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‘Hopefully One Day.’ Mother of Ed Sheeran’s Toddler Lookalike Wants Them to Meet
The "Shape of You" singer's tiny doppelgänger is apparently also a fan.

The world is full of fake Ed Sheerans: Rupert Grint, this fellow aspiring musician, and even a two-year-old girl named Isla Walton, complete with distinctive red hair. Last week, photos of the British child began to circulate online, resulting in a viral frenzy as viewers noted the surprising resemblance between the famous “Shape of You” singer and the toddler—despite their age difference.

On Wednesday, Isla’s mother Zoe Walton even shared her thoughts on her daughter’s newfound fame with E! News. The takeaway: “hopefully one day” the real Ed Sheeran and his generations-younger doppelgänger will have a chance to meet. (It’s not such a wild dream, by the way beacuse he has interacted in the past with both Grint and his less-famous counterpart, 21-year-old Ty Jones.)

“I can’t believe how viral it has gone,” she added of her daughter’s images. But maybe it shouldn’t be so much of a surprise: his album Divide is topping charts worldwide at the moment.

The icing on the cake is that, according to her aunt, little Walton is even a young fan of Sheeran’s music.

See the likeness below.

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Judgment Day for Obamacare Repeal
Morning Must Reads: March 23

It’s judgement day for President Trump and Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, as their plan to repeal and replace Obamacare faces an uncertain future on the floor of the House of Representatives. Right now they don’t have the votes, with moderates and conservatives both defecting from the legislation. Republican leadership and the White House are engaged in an 11th hour scramble to rewrite the bill in a fashion that can win over the votes needed to put the bill over the finish line. But in doing so they are guilty of much of the same closed-door dealmaking that they criticized Democrats for seven years ago. The new bill, with its still undetermined changes designed to win over the conservative Freedom Caucus, will not have been scored by the Congressional Budget Office, nor will the public have much time to read the bill before legislators cast their votes later tonight.

Is truth dead? That’s the subject of TIME’s new cover story by Michael Scherer, looking at the president’s habitual lies and misstatements—and how they’ve often gone without consequence. The cover is an homage to a legendary 1966 TIME cover, “Is God Dead?” In an interview with TIME, Trump refuses to concede he misstated facts in even the most obvious cases. But the mechanics of how Trump fudges the truth are the true focus of the piece. Trump is expert at leaving himself the smallest escape hatch—minor qualifiers and vague references—designed to make it harder to prove he was lying. His shamelessness about the truth has had the the odd effect of boosting his campaign during the election, but now that he’s president, it has all manners of unintended consequences. There’s little way to know for sure whether a presidential proclamation is factually accurate—and that’s just something America will have to live with for at least the next four years.

Gorsuch’s “bigly” day on the Hill. U.S. deepens role in Syria. And the Kochs rally against the healthcare bill.

Here are your must reads:

Must Reads

Can President Trump Handle the Truth?
The truth may be real, but falsehood often works better, TIME’s Michael Scherer writes

President Trump Faces His First Big Test in Congress
11th hour dealing as Washington watches whether he can govern, or if his agenda will be in jeopardy [TIME]

Key Republican Lawmaker Says Intelligence Was Collected on Members of Trump Transition
“Incidental collection” means they weren’t targets [TIME]

As Neil Gorsuch Avoided Tough Questions, Senators Turned on Each Other
It wasn’t about him Wednesday [TIME]

Read President Trump’s Interview With TIME on Truth and Falsehoods
Trump defends his controversial and false comments [TIME]

US Combat Airlift Marks Deepening Involvement in Syria
As Trump’s strategy review is ongoing [Associated Press]

Sound Off

“Hey look, in the mean time, I guess, I can’t be doing so badly, because I’m president, and you’re not. You know.” — President Trump to TIME’s Michael Scherer Wednesday

“There is no plan B. There is Plan A and Plan A. We’re going to get this done.” — White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer on the GOP’s Obamacare replacement plans Wednesday

Bits and Bites

TIME’s Nancy Gibbs: When a President Can’t Be Taken at His Word [TIME]

Is Truth Dead? Behind the TIME Cover [TIME]

US probes banking of ex-Trump campaign chief [Associated Press]

The Supreme Court Struck Down One of Neil Gorsuch’s Decisions During His Hearing [TIME]

Neil Gorsuch Used the Word ‘Bigly’ at His Confirmation Hearing [TIME]

Koch Brothers Will Spend Millions to Support Republicans Who Vote Against Health Care Bill [Associated Press]

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90 is the New 60
These are today's best ideas

1. On living longer: Will 90 become the new 60?

By David Steinsaltz in Nautilus

2. The most frightening thing about North Korea is what happens if it rapidly collapses.

By Harry J. Kazianis in the Week

3. Can the truth survive? 2016’s fake news may be leading to 2017’s false memories.

By Brian Resnick at Vox

4. Why don’t more young people go into science? “We don’t fail well.”

By Sara Whitlock in STAT News

5. This college alternative only gets paid if grads earn a salary.

By Ainsley Harris in Fast Company

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

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Seth Meyers Dubs Neil Gorsuch’s Nomination ‘One of the Greatest Thefts in Modern Politics’
"On top of that they got a conservative nominee who's shared very little about his actual views"

In the wake of the third day of Neil Gorsuch’s confirmation hearings to become a Supreme Court justice, Republicans and Democrats have blamed each other for partisanship on the committee. But it was the Republicans who Seth Meyers slammed for their attitude toward President Donald Trump’s nominee.

Following “A Closer Look” at the ongoing investigation of the Trump team’s potential ties to Russia and the president’s false wiretapping claims, the Late Night host dissected the cheerful demeanor of several GOP senators throughout Gorsuch’s testimony.

“Republicans were probably so giddy during the hearings because they knew they were getting away with one of the greatest thefts in modern politics, the stealing of a lifetime appointment to the Supreme Court from President Obama,” Meyers said. “And on top of that they got a conservative nominee who’s shared very little about his actual views.”

Watch the full clip above.

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An Unexpected Encounter in Mosul’s Ruins
"When you walk through it [now], you think it’s a ghost town," says AP photographer Felipe Dana

Ten minutes had passed before the boy appeared out of nowhere and into the frame. Felipe Dana, an Associated Press photographer shadowing Iraqi forces in western Mosul, was naturally drawn to this surreal scene: the shell of a car somehow perched atop the shell of a house in this shell of a neighborhood. The guts of another vehicle, on ground level, were on full display. Then, the boy on the bike.

The way Dana tells the story, it sounds like he saw a ghost. Judging by the way the boy gazes toward the man behind the camera, it appears he saw one too.

It was more than a week into his second stint of the offensive to wrestle control from Islamic State fighters. His first jaunt in Iraq came late last year during the initial push into the eastern section, which Iraqi officials announced in late January had been liberated. The current fight for the western half, with its dense civilian population and narrow streets, was expected to be far more brutal. Blood has spilled with every inch gained.

At a train station about a kilometer from a nearby front line, Dana says residents who fled their homes told of bodies in the streets. More than 750 civilians have been killed in the month of fighting in the western areas, the AP reports, citing medics along the front line. That’s in addition to the 1,600 estimated killed in the 100-day offensive for the eastern half of the city.

It was on his way out of Mosul, around 2 p.m. on March 19, that he came across the car resting atop the house. His vehicle drove past the scene, then parked a block away. The street appeared to be abandoned. Dana double-checked a map to make sure it was secure to walk in the area, and then asked some officers he saw nearby, who confirmed it.

At one point, angling for a better vantage point alongside a cameraman, Dana climbed onto a house across the street. After pointing his lens back toward the scene, the boy on the bike rode by. “It was a kind of reaction and I shot a couple of frames,” Dana says. “We didn’t expect to see anyone, especially a boy, riding peacefully through this. In a normal situation, it would be full of people everywhere. When you walk through it [now], you think it’s a ghost town.”

The dangers of working amid street warfare have made it difficult for Dana to get too close to the action: “One of the biggest challenges I have is to show how dramatic, and how massive, the destruction is.” What this picture does well is illustrate the horrors from which thousands have fled—and the unfathomable idea that many, in fact, have stayed in their homes.

“This boy is clearly not fleeing,” Dana says. “He’s living in this place.”

Felipe Dana is an Associated Press photographer based in Brazil.

Follow TIME LightBox on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

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Democrats Just Moved Closer to Filibustering Neil Gorsuch
Democrats just moved a little closer to filibustering Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch. Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer announced Thursday that he will oppose President Trump’s nominee on a cloture vote, prepping the way for a potential filibuster. Speaking on the Senate floor, the New York Democrat argued that Gorsuch “almost instinctively favors the powerful…

Democrats just moved a little closer to filibustering Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch.

Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer announced Thursday that he will oppose President Trump’s nominee on a cloture vote, prepping the way for a potential filibuster.

Speaking on the Senate floor, the New York Democrat argued that Gorsuch “almost instinctively favors the powerful over the weak,” that he “was unable to sufficiently convince me that he’d be an independent check” on President Trump, and that he’s “not a neutral legal mind but someone with a deep-seated conservative ideology.”

As the leading Democrat in the Senate, Schumer’s opposition to Gorsuch isn’t surprising, but going a step further and saying that he would vote against cloture was the loudest telegraph yet of potential Democratic plans for a filibuster. “I urge my colleagues to do the same,” Schumer said.

Senate rules require 60 votes to end debate and hold an up-or-down vote on a Supreme Court nominee, then a simple majority to confirm them. There are 52 Republicans in the Senate, so they could confirm Gorsuch along party lines, but they’ll need eight Democrats to join them in voting to end debate.

Ten Democrats are up for reelection in states that Trump won, so Republican lobbying efforts have already been underway to push them not to filibuster. But in the event that Republicans couldn’t get 60 votes, they could still trigger the so-called “nuclear option” to end the filibuster entirely, which would allow them to muscle Gorsuch through with a simple majority.

Schumer warned Republicans against taking that option.

“The answer isn’t to change the rules, it’s to change the nominee,” he said.

Schumer’s announcement came during the fourth and final day of Gorsuch’s hearings before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Throughout the week Gorsuch calmly refused to answer questions about specific cases, leading the senators to bicker among themselves about partisanship on the committee.

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