Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Tue, 17 Oct 2017 17:23:08 -0400

ISIS Losing Its 'Capital' Is A Pivotal Defeat For The Terrorist Group

ISIS Losing Its 'Capital' Is A Pivotal Defeat For The Terrorist GroupThe self-described Islamic State finally lost its tenuous grip on the Syrian city of Raqqa on Tuesday as U.S.-backed forces retook the extremist group’s last major urban territory following a four-month military campaign.


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15 Most Stressful Jobs in the World

Everyone has a bad day at work now and then. But if you have one of these 15 Most Stressful Jobs in the World, even one bad day can get you or someone else killed. From EMT to Coal Miner to Ice Road Trucker, these are the jobs that will keep you up at nights!


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Herald Sun | Breaking News
last updated: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 22:01:00 GMT

Canal jumper released on bail
AN 18-year-old man who jumped into a canal at Surfers Paradise to avoid being arrested by police on Wednesday night has been granted bail.

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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Wed, 18 Oct 2017 14:29:06 -0400

ISIS Losing Its 'Capital' Is A Pivotal Defeat For The Terrorist Group

ISIS Losing Its 'Capital' Is A Pivotal Defeat For The Terrorist GroupThe self-described Islamic State finally lost its tenuous grip on the Syrian city of Raqqa on Tuesday as U.S.-backed forces retook the extremist group’s last major urban territory following a four-month military campaign.


full story

Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Wed, 18 Oct 2017 14:29:06 -0400

ISIS Losing Its 'Capital' Is A Pivotal Defeat For The Terrorist Group

ISIS Losing Its 'Capital' Is A Pivotal Defeat For The Terrorist GroupThe self-described Islamic State finally lost its tenuous grip on the Syrian city of Raqqa on Tuesday as U.S.-backed forces retook the extremist group’s last major urban territory following a four-month military campaign.


full story

Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
last updated: Tue, 17 Oct 2017 19:03:25 -0400

ISIS Losing Its 'Capital' Is A Pivotal Defeat For The Terrorist Group

ISIS Losing Its 'Capital' Is A Pivotal Defeat For The Terrorist GroupThe self-described Islamic State finally lost its tenuous grip on the Syrian city of Raqqa on Tuesday as U.S.-backed forces retook the extremist group’s last major urban territory following a four-month military campaign.


full story

Herald Sun | Top Stories
last updated: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 09:41:00 GMT

Response from Eddie, AFL not nearly enough
THERE'S so much wrong about the Eddie McGuire-James-Brayshaw-Danny Frawley pack mentality attack of Caroline Wilson. As was the AFL's insipid response on Monday.

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Secret tape not the only talking point
THE reasons behind a decision to release a secret expletive-laden recording of former Chief Justice Tim Carmody are almost as juicy as the tape is expected to be.

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Digg Top Stories
last updated: Wed, 18 Oct 2017 23:45:28 +0000

The Man Who Traveled Back In Time To Save The Internet
One legendary hoax captivated fans of the supernatural and the paranormal like few others. November 2, 2000 saw the first online post by the individual who would come to be known as "John Titor." Titor claimed to be a man from the future, sent to the past to retrieve... a portable computer.

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Exclusive: New data shows race disparities in Canada's bail system
TORONTO (Reuters) - Black people in Canada’s most populous province spent longer behind bars awaiting trial than white people charged with many of the same categories of crimes in each of the past five years, according to data obtained by Reuters.

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BuzzFeed - Latest
last updated: Tue, 17 Oct 2017 15:10:25 -0400

“A Movement For Radical Community Healing”

Meet The Black Woman Who Started The “Me Too” Campaign Against Sexual Assault


View Entire Post ›

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TIME
last updated:

‘Bigotry Seems Emboldened.’ Read George W. Bush’s Speech Attacking Nationalism in Politics
The former President said the U.S. is suffering from a "crisis of confidence"

Former President George W. Bush expressed concern Thursday over the rise of isolationist sentiment in the United States, claiming the country is suffering from a “crisis of confidence.”

“We’ve seen nationalism distorted into nativism – forgotten the dynamism that immigration has always brought to America. We see a fading confidence in the value of free markets and international trade – forgetting that conflict, instability, and poverty follow in the wake of protectionism. We have seen the return of isolationist sentiments – forgetting that American security is directly threatened by the chaos and despair of distant places, where threats such as terrorism, infectious disease, criminal gangs and drug trafficking tend to emerge,” Bush said, speaking at a national forum on liberty hosted by the George W. Bush institute in New York City. “In all these ways, we need to recall and recover our own identity. Americans have a great advantage: To renew our country, we only need to remember our values.”

The solution, Bush cautioned, was not for the U.S. to retreat internationally, but to retain the reins of leadership. “One strength of free societies is their ability to adapt to economic and social disruptions,” he said. “And that should be our goal: to prepare American workers for new opportunities, to care in practical, empowering ways for those who may feel left behind.”

Bush also implicitly referred to the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, noting that “repressive governments” attempted “a major effort to encourage division in western societies and undermine the legitimacy of elections. ”

Bush’s speech bared similarities to the one his former Republican primary opponent, Arizona Senator John McCain, delivered earlier this week after accepting the Liberty Medal at the U.S. Constitution. In that speech, McCain slammed what he called “some half-baked, spurious nationalism cooked up by people who would rather find scapegoats than solve problems.”

Neither Bush nor McCain directly mentioned President Donald Trump by name. But concern about current United States’ leadership was evident in both set of remarks.

But ultimately, Bush expressed optimism the United States would prevail in its current challenges. “The American spirit does not say we shall manage or we shall make the best of it, it says we shall overcome,” he concluded. “And that is exactly what we are going to do with God’s help.”

Read Bush’s full speech below.

Thank you all. Thank you. Ok, Padilla gracias. So, I painted Ramon. I wish you were still standing here. It’s a face only a mother could love – no, it’s a fabulous face. (Laughter.) I love you Ramon, thank you very much for being here.

And, Grace Jo thank you for your testimony. And, big Tim. I got to know Tim as a result of Presidential Leadership Scholars at the Bush Center along with the Clinton Foundation, with help from 41 and LBJ’s libraries.

I am thrilled that friends of ours from Afghanistan, China, North Korea, and Venezuela are here as well. These are people who have experienced the absence of freedom and they know what it’s like and they know there is a better alternative to tyranny.

Laura and I are thrilled that the Bush Center supporters are here. Bernie [Tom Bernstein], I want to thank you and your committee. I call him Bernie. (Laughter.)

It’s amazing to have Secretary Albright share the stage with Condi and Ambassador Haley. For those of you that kind of take things for granted, that’s a big deal. (Laughter and Applause.) Thank you.

We are gathered in the cause of liberty this is a unique moment. The great democracies face new and serious threats – yet seem to be losing confidence in their own calling and competence. Economic, political and national security challenges proliferate, and they are made worse by the tendency to turn inward. The health of the democratic spirit itself is at issue. And the renewal of that spirit is the urgent task at hand.

Since World War II, America has encouraged and benefited from the global advance of free markets, from the strength of democratic alliances, and from the advance of free societies. At one level, this has been a raw calculation of interest. The 20th century featured some of the worst horrors of history because dictators committed them. Free nations are less likely to threaten and fight each other.
And free trade helped make America into a global economic power.

For more than 70 years, the presidents of both parties believed that American security and prosperity were directly tied to the success of freedom in the world. And they knew that the success depended, in large part, on U.S. leadership. This mission came naturally, because it expressed the DNA of American idealism.

We know, deep down, that repression is not the wave of the future. We know that the desire for freedom is not confined to, or owned by, any culture; it is the inborn hope of our humanity. We know that free governments are the only way to ensure that the strong are just and the weak are valued. And we know that when we lose sight of our ideals, it is not democracy that has failed. It is the failure of those charged with preserving and protecting democracy.

This is not to underestimate the historical obstacles to the development of democratic institutions and a democratic culture. Such problems nearly destroyed our country – and that should encourage a spirit of humility and a patience with others. Freedom is not merely a political menu option, or a foreign policy fad; it should be the defining commitment of our country, and the hope of the world.

That appeal is proved not just by the content of people’s hopes, but a noteworthy hypocrisy: No democracy pretends to be a tyranny. Most tyrannies pretend they are democracies. Democracy remains the definition of political legitimacy. That has not changed, and that will not change.

Yet for years, challenges have been gathering to the principles we hold dear. And, we must take them seriously. Some of these problems are external and obvious. Here in New York City, you know the threat of terrorism all too well. It is being fought even now on distant frontiers and in the hidden world of intelligence and surveillance. There is the frightening, evolving threat of nuclear proliferation and outlaw regimes. And there is an aggressive challenge by Russia and China to the norms and rules of the global order – proposed revisions that always seem to involve less respect for the rights of free nations and less freedom for the individual.

These matters would be difficult under any circumstances. They are further complicated by a trend in western countries away from global engagement and democratic confidence. Parts of Europe have developed an identity crisis. We have seen insolvency, economic stagnation, youth unemployment, anger about immigration, resurgent ethno-nationalism, and deep questions about the meaning and durability of the European Union.

America is not immune from these trends. In recent decades, public confidence in our institutions has declined. Our governing class has often been paralyzed in the face of obvious and pressing needs. The American dream of upward mobility seems out of reach for some who feel left behind in a changing economy. Discontent deepened and sharpened partisan conflicts. Bigotry seems emboldened. Our politics seems more vulnerable to conspiracy theories and outright fabrication.

There are some signs that the intensity of support for democracy itself has waned, especially among the young, who never experienced the galvanizing moral clarity of the Cold War, or never focused on the ruin of entire nations by socialist central planning. Some have called this “democratic deconsolidation.” Really, it seems to be a combination of weariness, frayed tempers, and forgetfulness.

We have seen our discourse degraded by casual cruelty. At times, it can seem like the forces pulling us apart are stronger than the forces binding us together. Argument turns too easily into animosity. Disagreement escalates into dehumanization. Too often, we judge other groups by their worst examples while judging ourselves by our best intentions – forgetting the image of God we should see in each other.

We’ve seen nationalism distorted into nativism – forgotten the dynamism that immigration has always brought to America. We see a fading confidence in the value of free markets and international trade – forgetting that conflict, instability, and poverty follow in the wake of protectionism.

We have seen the return of isolationist sentiments – forgetting that American security is directly threatened by the chaos and despair of distant places, where threats such as terrorism, infectious disease, criminal gangs and drug trafficking tend to emerge.

In all these ways, we need to recall and recover our own identity. Americans have a great advantage: To renew our country, we only need to remember our values.

This is part of the reason we meet here today. How do we begin to encourage a new, 21st century American consensus on behalf of democratic freedom and free markets? That’s the question I posed to scholars at the Bush Institute. That is what Pete Wehner and Tom Melia, who are with us today, have answered with “The Spirit of Liberty: At Home, In The World,” a Call to Action paper.

The recommendations come in broad categories. Here they are: First, America must harden its own defenses. Our country must show resolve and resilience in the face of external attacks on our democracy. And that begins with confronting a new era of cyber threats.

America is experiencing the sustained attempt by a hostile power to feed and exploit our country’s divisions. According to our intelligence services, the Russian government has made a project of turning Americans against each other. This effort is broad, systematic and stealthy, it’s conducted across a range of social media platforms. Ultimately, this assault won’t succeed. But foreign aggressions – including cyber-attacks, disinformation and financial influence – should not be downplayed or tolerated. This is a clear case where the strength of our democracy begins at home. We must secure our electoral infrastructure and protect our electoral system from subversion.

The second category of recommendations concerns the projection of American leadership – maintaining America’s role in sustaining and defending an international order rooted in freedom and free markets.

Our security and prosperity are only found in wise, sustained, global engagement: In the cultivation of new markets for American goods. In the confrontation of security challenges before they fully materialize and arrive on our shores. In the fostering of global health and development as alternatives to suffering and resentment. In the attraction of talent, energy and enterprise from all over the world. In serving as a shining hope for refugees and a voice for dissidents, human rights defenders, and the oppressed.

We should not be blind to the economic and social dislocations caused by globalization. People are hurting. They are angry. And, they are frustrated. We must hear them and help them. But we can’t wish globalization away, any more than we could wish away the agricultural revolution or the industrial revolution. One strength of free societies is their ability to adapt to economic and social disruptions. And that should be our goal: to prepare American workers for new opportunities, to care in practical, empowering ways for those who may feel left behind. The first step should be to enact policies that encourage robust economic growth by unlocking the potential of the private sector. And for unleashing the creativity and the compassion of this country. The third focus of the document is strengthening Democratic citizenship. And here we must put particular emphasis on the values and views of the young. Being an American involves the embrace of high ideals and responsibility. we’ve become the heirs to Thomas Jefferson by accepting the ideal of dignity found in the Declaration of Independence. We’ve become the heirs of James Madison by understanding the genius and values of the U.S. Constitution. We’ve become the heirs of Martin Luther King Jr. by recognizing one another not as the colors of their skin but by the content of their character. This means that people of every race, religion, ethnicity can be fully and equally American.

It means that bigotry or white supremacy in any form is blasphemy against the American creed. And it means the very identity of our nation depends on the passing of civic ideals to the next generation. We need a renewed emphasis on civil learning in schools, and our young people need positive role models. Bullying and prejudice in our public life sets a national tone. It provides permission for cruelty and bigotry and compromises the moral education of children. The only way to pass along civic values is to first live up to them.

Finally the call to action calls to major institutions in our democracy, both public and private, to constantly and urgently attend to the problem of declining trust. For example, our democracy needs a media that is transparent, accurate and fair. Our democracy needs religious institutions that demonstrate integrity and champion civil discourse. Our democracy needs institutions of higher learning that are examples of truth and free expression. In short it is time for American institutions to step up and provide our cultural and moral leadership for this nation.

Ten years ago I attended a conference and democracy and security in Prague. The goal was to put human rights and human freedom at the center of our relationship with repressive governments. The Prague charter signed by champions of liberty Vaclav Havel, Natan Sharansky,Jose Maria Aznar called for the isolation and ostracism of regimes that suppressed peaceful opponents by threats and violence. Little did we know that a decade later a crisis of confidence would be developing within a core democracies, making the message of freedom more inhibited and wavering. Little did we know that the repressive governments would be undertaking a major effort to encourage division in western societies and undermine the legitimacy of elections. Repressive rivals along with skeptics here at home misunderstand something important: its the greatest advantage of free societies that we creatively adapt to challenges without the direction of some central authority. Self-correction is a secret strength to freedom. We are a nation with a history of resilience and a genius for renewal. Right now one of our worst national problems is a deficit of confidence but the cause of freedom justifies our faith and effort. It still inspires men and women in the darkest corners in the world. it will inspire a rising generations. The American spirit does not say we shall manage or we shall make the best of it, it says we shall overcome. And that is exactly what we are going to do with God’s help. Thank you.

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The Story of Leonardo DiCaprio’s Hocus Pocus Audition Is Everything You Want It to Be
"He’s just the most sincere and most centered and a wild child at the same time"

Hocus Pocus may be one of the most popular Halloween cult classics out there, but it apparently had the potential to be even more iconic. In a recent interview with Entertainment Weekly, director Kenny Ortega shared the story of Leonardo DiCaprio’s audition to play Max in the 1993 tale of the Sanderson Sisters.

“The [casting] ladies called me up and they said, ‘We’re sending you an actor today but he’s not available but you’re going to fall in love with him but you can’t have him.’ I’m like, ‘Why are you teasing me?’ They were like, ‘You need to see this guy because he’ll inspire you and if nothing else, he’ll help you find the right guy to play Max,'” he explained. “And they send me in a young Leonardo DiCaprio, who I completely and absolutely fall in love with.”

Ortega went on to explain how he couldn’t help but be charmed by Leo even knowing he was otherwise committed.

“He’s just the most sincere and most centered and a wild child at the same time,” he said. “He was feeling awkward. He was like, ‘I just feel really bad being here because I’m up for two other movies and I really want them both and I don’t want to lead you on.’ I was like, ‘That’s okay, I was already warned. What are the movies?’ One of them was This Boy’s Life and the other one was What’s Eating Gilbert Grape. Obviously, he left and incredible things happened for that young man and to this day, but meeting him awakened me to the kind of spirit and fun and sincerity that I was looking for in an actor.”

Read the full story at EW.

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President Trump Gave Himself a ‘10’ for His Response to Puerto Rico
"I'd say it was a 10"

President Trump gave his administration a “10” on its handling of the hurricane in Puerto Rico.

Speaking in the Oval Office with the island territory’s governor at his side, Trump said that he was satisfied with how emergency managers had handled the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, despite widespread water and power shortages.

“I’d say it was a 10,” he told reporters, repeating twice that he would grade it a “10.”

The death toll from the hurricane is now at 48, with about 117 people still unaccounted for. Roughly 3 million Puerto Ricans, or more than 80% of the island’s residents, don’t have power. Nearly half of Puerto Rico’s sewage treatment plants are out of service. Hundreds of thousands of residents are without adequate drinking water, leading some to get water from polluted Superfund sites.

“All of the armed forces, what they’ve done has been — Army, Navy, the Marines, the Air Force, all of the goods dropped in. Helicopters that weren’t even meant for this purpose, all of a sudden, they’re delivering food and services,” said Trump. “I would give a 10.”

Trump also asked Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rossello how he did.

“Governor, I just want to maybe ask you a question, because for the spirit of these people that have worked so hard, and so long, like Tom and like Brock and like so many others, did the United States, did our government — when we came in, did we do a great job? Military? First responders? FEMA?” he asked. “Did we do a great job?”

Rossello remarked that Trump “responded immediately” and has been on the phone with him almost every day since the disaster.

“Do we need to do a lot more? Of course we do,” he said. “And I think everybody over here recognizes there’s a lot of work to be done in Puerto Rico. But with your leadership, sir, and with everybody here, we’re committed to achieving that in the long run.”

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‘No Way for a Person to Live.’ Sex Trafficking Victim Speaks Out After Her Rescue
The woman, identified only as Ali, had spent five years on the streets of Philadelphia

A Philadelphia woman who was rescued from sex trafficking spoke out about her former life of drug addiction and prostitution in a new video the FBI posted Wednesday.

The woman, identified only as Ali, had spent five years on the streets, where she quickly became addicted to heroin and fully dependent on her sex traffickers for drugs and money, officials said. She escaped with the help of law enforcement, although it’s unclear when.

“They have that control over you,” Ali said of her sex traffickers, who physically abused her. “I felt obligated to do certain things with them in order for them to keep providing for me . . . I was willing to sacrifice enduring that because without that person I thought I had nothing.”

Ali, who has a master’s degree, said she left her stable home for the notoriously violent streets of Kensington after she tried heroin and became addicted. “It’s honestly like a war zone,” she said of the neighborhood. “Most of what goes on there is drugs, prostitution and violence. It’s crazy when I think about it now because it’s no way for a person to live.”

William Johnson, a deputy sheriff with the Philadelphia Sheriff’s Office, arrested Ali after her family asked authorities for help finding her. When that happened, Ali said she was scared but also relieved because she “knew that it was over.” “I knew that the way that I was living and my days on the streets and years of living that way was ending,” she said. “I don’t think I would have made it off of the streets alive had I continued to stay out there.”

Ali now works at a treatment center helping others fight their addictions, according to the FBI. It’s unclear how old she was when she was rescued.

The agency posted Ali’s story as it announced it had recently rescued 84 children, including a 3-month-old girl, and arrested 120 alleged traffickers, following a nationwide crackdown on child sex trafficking.

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The CIA Fired a Dog Because Sniffing Bombs Just Wasn’t Her True Calling
Lulu may be a good girl, but she’s not a good fit for the CIA. That’s the takeaway from the latest update from the federal agency, which shared a blog post about one of the bomb-sniffing dogs in its latest trainee class. Lulu, a one-and-a-half-year-old black lab, has been in the training program for a…

Lulu may be a good girl, but she’s not a good fit for the CIA.

That’s the takeaway from the latest update from the federal agency, which shared a blog post about one of the bomb-sniffing dogs in its latest trainee class. Lulu, a one-and-a-half-year-old black lab, has been in the training program for a few weeks. But the CIA says she just “wasn’t interested in detecting explosive odors.”

“All dogs, just like most human students, have good days and bad days when learning something new,” they explained. Yet for Lulu, those “bad days” outnumbered her good ones — and they realized her heart just wasn’t in it. Initially described as “hyper and silly” with an “easygoing sweetness,” it looks like she had other passions than bomb detection. “Lulu was no longer interested in searching for explosives. Even when they could motivate her with food and play to search, she was clearly not enjoying herself any longer,” the CIA wrote.

Luckily, Lulu’s handler is adopting her — regardless of her disinterest in a technical career with law enforcement. “She now enjoys her days playing with his kids, sniffing out rabbits and squirrels in the backyard, and eating meals and snacks out of a dog dish,” they further note. Rabbits or squirrels? Or bombs and explosives? Clearly, Lulu had a preference. “We’ll miss Lulu, but this was the right decision for her,” they conclude.

She was one of six pups in the latest training class — you can follow the rest of the canines’ progress here.

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‘We Are Not Alone’: Ellen DeGeneres Shares Inspiring ‘Me Too’ Message
"As hard as this is to talk about, at least we are talking about it"

Ellen DeGeneres is speaking out in support of the recent “Me Too” movement to raise awareness of the prevalence of sexual harassment and assault. After sharing her own #MeToo tweet on Tuesday, the talk show host spoke candidly about the meaning of the campaign during Thursday’s episode of Ellen.

“This is not a male thing or a female thing, it is not a Hollywood thing or a political thing. This is a human thing and it happens in the workplace, it happens in families, it happens all over the world and we are all the same,” she said. “We all want the same thing: we want respect and love and kindness.”

DeGeneres went on to discuss the importance of the reignited conversation surrounding the topic.

“As hard as this is to talk about, at least we are talking about it,” she said. “It’s not like this is a new thing. This has been going on forever and thanks to being connected to social media, we can see it for what it is and that we are not alone, and hopefully the conversation that we are having now will free all of us. If you are a parent, we can break the cycle and teach our little girls and our little boys that girls should be strong, boys should be kind.”

The “Me Too” movement was elevated by actor Alyssa Milano when she tweeted the message, “If you’ve been sexually harassed or assaulted write ‘me too’ as a reply to this tweet,’ in the wake of the ongoing Harvey Weinstein scandal.

Watch the full clip below.

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How to View Uranus Without a Telescope as It Nears Earth Tonight
"It's visible all night long and its blue-green color is unmistakeable."

From about 1.7 billion miles away, Sky-gazers will have a good chance of seeing the icy planet Uranus Thursday night — without the help of a telescope.

Uranus is making its closest approach to our planet, NASA says, and because it will be sandwiched between Earth and the sun, it could be visible to the naked eye. A waning moon, and the resulting darker sky, should help.

“It’s visible all night long and its blue-green color is unmistakeable. It may be bright enough to see with your naked eye — and for sure in binoculars,” according to NASA.

Uranus is 4 times wider than Earth. For perspective, NASA says, if Earth was the size of a nickel, Uranus would be about as big as a softball.

Despite its relative size to Earth, National Geographic notes, the planet would still be just barely visible without any viewing equipment even under ideal conditions. But binoculars, rather than a full telescope, should suffice, NASA says.

The best way to see Uranus, according to National Geographic, is by looking toward the southeast, where it will be close to the Pisces constellation.

“Scan the constellation carefully, and look for a tiny blue-green disk to pop out against the background of fainter stars,” the magazine advises.

Since Uranus will remain close by, those who do have a telescope will be able to see it throughout the month of October.

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The FDA Just Approved a New Way of Fighting Cancer Using Personalized Gene Therapy
The FDA approved the second CAR T cell-based treatment for cancer, which co-opts the immune system to fight the disease

Immune-based cancer treatments are surging forward as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Wednesday approved the second of a new technology called CAR T, this time to treat diffuse large b-cell lymphoma, a type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. In August, the agency approved the first CAR T cell therapy, a type of gene therapy to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children.

CAR T cell therapy, which stands for chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy, involves removing immune cells known as T cells, genetically engineering them to recognize proteins on cancer cells and target them for destruction, and infusing the modified immune cells back into the patient. The treatment works the same way that immune cells eliminate bacteria and viruses. It’s proving especially effective for blood cancers, since the immune system can ferret out an impressive number of cancer cells lurking anywhere in the blood and body.

“We think this therapy is here to stay. It’s very different from chemo,” says Dr. Frederick Locke, research director and clinical director of immune cell therapy at Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa. “This is a living, breathing therapy that we are putting back into the patient that can persist, and continue to fight against the cancer. It’s pretty amazing.”

In the trial the FDA reviewed, submitted by Kite Pharma and Gilead Sciences, 101 people with one of three types of lymphoma were enrolled to receive the treatment, called Yescarta, at 22 hospitals. All of the people in the study had tried and failed to respond to existing treatments of chemotherapy and stem cell transplants; they had no additional therapies available to them. Overall, 54% of these end-stage patients saw their cancers shrink or stop growing after six months, and 80% were still alive.

“The results are exciting, and pretty much a game changer,” says Locke, who oversaw one of the study sites. “We know these patients might have a one in four chance of having any response to chemo, and a less than one in 10 chance of a complete response.”

Yescarta could be useful for the 3,500 people in the U.S. who are currently exhausting their options for treating their lymphomas. As with the first CAR T cell treatment approved, called Kymriah by Novartis, the therapy will only be available at 10 to 15 hospitals that have experience in managing the genetically modified cells and monitoring for the treatment’s side effects, which can be severe. During the trial for Yescarta, a patient died from a brain toxicity of the therapy. Because the treatment revs up the immune system, it can cause dangerous and potentially fatal swelling and inflammation. Doctors have learned to manage the complications, but it remains a risk of the CAR T cell approach, and one of the reasons it won’t be available at every cancer center at first. Because people who have not responded to other treatments for their cancer may have compromised health overall, determining who will benefit and who might be more susceptible to the side effects will be a decision that doctors with experience in transplants and cell treatments will be in the best position to make.

MORE: New Cancer Immunotherapy Leads to Remissions

Locke says that treating the first signs of toxicity early also seems to reduce the severity of symptoms, and doctors will continue to investigate factors that can affect who might be more vulnerable to the side effects.

For now, the therapy could provide another option for patients with end-stage lymphomas. Physicians at Moffitt Cancer Center are already planning to expand the hospital’s resources in order to meet the anticipated demand.

The treatment is estimated to cost about $373,000. But experts note that if it is as powerful as the early results show, that high price tag could end up actually saving costs, compared to the multiple rounds of chemotherapy and transplants over a period of years that most people with lymphoma currently pay for.

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How Do You Exercise in Space?
Find out in TIME's latest Reddit roundup

TIME’s new weekly roundup brings you the best and most surprising things happening on Reddit:

Outer Space Fitness

Astronaut and subject of TIME’s Emmy award winning documentary A Year in Space Scott Kelly did and an AMA to field questions on everything from viewing earth from above to his hopes for the world’s space programs. But one question stood out. How do you work out in space?

“We have a resistive exercise machine that mimics weight very well. We have a treadmill and a stationary bicycle. And we exercise every day…well, I exercised six days a week,” he wrote.

Another thing you return to Earth with (aside from great space selfies): a new outlook on everyone and everything around you, which Kelly explained some people dub the “orbital perspective.” He wrote:

“You definitely have a different perspective when you’ve spent time in space, and some people refer to this as the orbital perspective: a sense of being more empathetic to the environment and the human condition.”

This Kid Aced Her Flo from Progressive Costume

When it comes to an unexpected but universally recognizable costume, this clipboard-wielding kid going as the bubbly Flo (played by Stephanie Courtney) from Progressive commercials takes the cake. According to her dad, 5-year-old Avery has cosplayed as Katy Perry and Raven in the past, but this might be her finest costume yet.

Adam Wood

Being ‘The Good House’ on Halloween Night

Some lifelong dreams never come true. This crucial one did. One redditor shared that they bought a full-size pack of Mars candy to hand out to local kids, fulfilling their childhood trick-or-treating fantasy. It’s a pricey move that’s sure to leave all those bite-size candy houses in the dust.

One commenter predicted this would set quite the precedent. “Before long, parents will be shipping their kids in from out of town to capitalize on the house that gives out full size candy bars. A secondary economy will form around the acquisition and trading of these full size treats,” redditor kayonesoft wrote.

A DIY Project From Two Cultures

To honor her heritage, Maya Caulfield hand-stitched plaid and tartan button-down shirts and boxer shorts from thrift shorts to create a kimono. The picture quickly rose to the top of the /r/pics subreddit.

The daughter of a Japanese mother and a Scottish father, the Denver Colorado DIY-er explained that the kimono was a way for her to connect to her dual ancestry.

“Growing up, I did feel dissociated from my heritage because I thought I didn’t wholly belong to either group, but now as an adult I see it as an asset to my art because it is different and the most beautiful things are just a little different,” she told TIME.

Maya Caulfield

 

Val Kilmer Wants to Know What Movie Character You’d Like to Be on Halloween

The Batman Forever actor posed a pressing Halloween question, sharing that costume tip requests from fans of his characters got him curious enough to start this discussion topic in the popular /r/movies subreddit.

What would be his answer? “I would possibly go with someone Spencer Tracy played like Sam Craig in Woman of the Year,” Kilmer shared.

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Kids Are Spending More Time On Mobile Devices Than Ever Before
And almost half have their own tablets

Almost half of young children now have their own tablet, a new report says.

According to the report, which comes from Common Sense Media, those tablets are seeing plenty of use. Kids younger than eight are reportedly spending an average of two hours and 19 minutes per day glued to screens. Roughly 30 percent of that time is spent on mobile devices such as tablets and smartphones. Forty-two percent of youngsters have a personal tablet.

While screen use has held fairly steady over time—kids in 2011 spent two hours and 16 minutes per day looking at screens, for example—the medium of choice has changed dramatically, according to the Common Sense Census. Television is still the most popular screen, but daily time spent watching the tube has dropped by 11 minutes since 2011. During the same time period, meanwhile, mobile device use has exploded from five minutes per day to its current 48 minutes.

Meanwhile, kids are still spending about a half hour per day reading or being read to—and, interestingly enough, the vast majority of that time is spent with print media, not e-readers.

Still, the uptick in mobile usage may be cause for concern. “Mobile device use is more individual, immersive and on-demand, and it influences interpersonal dynamics differently and can be harder to break yourself (or your child) away from,” writes Dr. Jenny Radesky, a pediatrician at the University of Michigan, in an opening letter for the Common Sense Media report. Studies have also linked excessive device use among youth to everything from speech delays to decreased emotional intelligence.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children between the ages of two and five spend no more than an hour per day on screens, and suggests “consistent limits” for kids older than six.

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